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DESERT WARRIOR by Robert Taylor

With Mussolini’s army faring badly in North Africa, Hitler quickly recognised that he would have no option but to give his Italian ally substantial military assistance. It came in the form of Generalleutnant Erwin Rommel who, on 12 February 1941, landed in Tripoli ready to take command of a new German army being dispatched to Libya. Its name was soon to be famous around the world – the Afrika Korps.

Assigned to their support was I./JG27 under the command of Eduard Neumann, one of the most respected Luftwaffe fighter leaders of World War 2. The Gruppe was made up of veterans who’d taken part in the French campaign and the Battle of Britain so it didn’t take long for Neumann’s pilots to make their presence felt; on their first combat mission from Ain el-Gazala on 19 April they claimed the destruction of four RAF Hurricanes and in the process notched up the Gruppe’s 100th victory of the war so far.

With the arrival of the rest of the Gruppe from Russia at the end of 1941, JG27 would spend the next year defending Rommel’s front line in North Africa, their name indelibly linked to the Western Desert. And it was here that Neumann would mentor Hans-Joachim Marseilles who, awarded the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds, scored all but seven of his 158 victories in the Western Desert to become one of the highest-scoring Luftwaffe Aces in history.

Previously unreleased, Desert Warrior was painted in 1986, a period of his career that included some of Robert’s most famous Luftwaffe pieces such as JG-52 (1986), Ace of Aces (1988), Swansong (1988), The Abbeville Boys (1989), Stuka (1990) and Gathering Storm (1990). Robert fittingly depicts a Bf109 from I./JG27 near their base in north-east Libya, a small dusty village near the coast called Ain el-Gazala, from which they were tasked to protect the Ju87 Stukas attacking the encircled British army in Tobruk, just 40 miles away.

RETURN OF THE PATHFINDERS by Anthony Saunders

Never had there been an aircraft like the de Havilland Mosquito; constructed almost entirely of wood with two Merlin engines bolted under each wing it could outrun any other piston-engine fighter in the world. Only when the Luftwaffe’s Me262 jet came on the scene did the enemy have anything of such speed but, unlike the Me262, the Mosquito – nicknamed the ‘Wooden Wonder’ – was perhaps the most versatile aircraft of World War II.

Allied squadrons operated Mosquitos in a huge number of roles including both day and night-bombers, night-fighter, as a ship-buster with Coastal Command, bomber support, photo-reconnaissance and, thanks to its speed and manoeuvrability as one of the finest intruders of the war. Mosquitos carried out some of the most dangerous and daring low-level pinpoint precision strikes ever seen and, of course, as part of the RAF’s elite Pathfinder force.

Formed in 1942 and led by the inspirational Don Bennett, perhaps the finest navigator in aviation history who became the youngest Air Vice-Marshal in the RAF, the Pathfinders were Bomber Command’s specialist target-marking squadrons who, flying ahead of the main bomber force, located and identified their assigned targets with flares.

Anthony Saunders’ atmospheric painting Return of the Pathfinders depicts the Pathfinder Mosquitos of 139 (Jamaica) Squadron, a unit that had joined Bomber Command’s No 8 (Pathfinder) Group in July 1943. Anthony skilfully conjures up the mood as dawn breaks over a crisp, icy landscape in a burst of colour that illuminates the Mosquitos as they follow the course of the River Great Ouse on their return to RAF Upwood after a long overnight trip to Germany in early 1944. During a period that began on the night of 20 / 21st February 1944 this particular squadron undertook a series of 36 consecutive night attacks on Berlin.

JOURNEYS END by Richard Taylor

At 11.00am on Friday 11 November 1918 the guns along the Western Front fell silent.

Germany, in retreat and humiliated by the failure of its great Spring Offensive, had sued for peace and an Armistice had finally been signed. The war described as ‘the war to end all wars’ was finally over but peace came at a terrible price; nearly a million soldiers from the British Empire alone had died and many more had been injured. Around the world it has been estimated that perhaps as many as 20 million people had perished in what had become one of the deadliest conflicts known to man.

To commemorate the centenary of that November Armistice, Richard Taylor has created a moving tribute to all the Allied soldiers who took part in that epic struggle. Fittingly, as an acclaimed aviation artist, he has chosen to do this with a powerful drawing that offers us a glimpse of one of the many aviators who pioneered a new form of warfare that, in the end, helped bring about final victory.

Journey’s End portrays the pilot of a Sopwith Camel in the colourful markings of 9 Squadron RFC who, as he coaxes his smoking and battle-damaged aircraft back to base, has relied on his wingman for support. Luckily their colleagues have successfully driven off the enemy fighter patrol and, with their home airstrip now in view just beyond the poppy field, today’s flight will end in safety.

STORMBIRDS RISING by Robert Taylor

The Me262 was sleek, beautifully proportioned and deadly, and with a top speed of around 540mph was a 100mph faster than anything in the Allied arsenal. It could have changed the course of the war.

April 1945: and the end of the war was growing closer. By now the weather was improving and, as the days began to lengthen, the American Eighth Air Force was able to dispatch well over a thousand bombers, with a fighter escort to match, on some of the largest raids of the war. The Allies’ overwhelming strength meant the contest was all but one-sided; yet the expert pilots of the Luftwaffe were still a force to be reckoned with – especially when armed with their revolutionary Me262 jets.

Had Hitler recognized the jets’ full potential as a fighter, as Adolf Galland had pushed for, then the course of the war might have been very different. But he didn’t, and by the time this radical new jet was put into mass production as a fighter, it was too late to save Hitler’s Reich.

Although some 1,400 Me262s were built, rarely more than a couple of hundred were fully operational at any one time, continually hampered by shortages of fuel, spare parts and trained pilots. American factories, in contrast, could build that number of combat aircraft in a day.

Even so, Allied bombers had frequent contacts with Me262s, especially those of JG7, and had run into serious trouble from the large jet formations that the Gruppe had managed to assemble. Eight B-17s had been lost in one such encounter and the Fortress crews were more than wary of what they might expect as they battled through the skies above what remained of the Nazi heartland.

Robert Taylor, the master of aviation art, portrays the Me262s of III./JG7 in his powerful painting as a tribute to this revolutionary aircraft. He captures a scene during the final weeks of the war as Leutnant Hermann Buchner, by now one of the most famous jet Aces and recipient of the coveted Knight’s Cross, joins his fellow pilots of III./JG7 as they climb to intercept a large formation of American bombers having just left their base at Parchim. Below them the tranquillity of the meandering River Havel, flowing gracefully through the countryside west of Berlin, is in stark contrast to the deadly encounters that will soon take place overhead.

AT THE DAYS END by Robert Taylor

September 1940; and the fate of the free world hung in the balance. A year had passed since Hitler had ordered his armies to crush Poland, which they did in a matter of weeks. And, for a while, Europe had held its breath, waiting for the next move.

It came on 9 April 1940 when German forces trampled through Denmark and seized Norway. Four weeks later, they turned their attentions south. On Friday 10 May, Hitler’s panzers rolled across the Dutch border heading for France. Overwhelmed by the onslaught Luxembourg and the Netherlands surrendered, followed by Belgium whilst an out-gunned and out- manoeuvred British Expeditionary Force retreated to the beaches of Dunkirk and a humiliating evacuation. On 25 June France, too, capitulated.

Britain stood alone, ripe for invasion.

But before the Führer could sweep through Admiralty Arch on his way to Buckingham Palace, his army must cross 22 miles of water – the English Channel. It sounded little enough, men had swum it, but to cross it the Germans must take control of the sky – hardly a problem for the Luftwaffe, Goering told Hitler; after all, his air force was the most powerful on earth. Or so he thought.

For what Goering had overlooked was the tenacity of a few thousand brave young men to thwart his plans – the pilots of RAF Fighter Command. Mostly British, they also included volunteers from Canada, Australia, New Zealand and countries across the British Empire. They were joined by pilots who had escaped from the newly-occupied countries in Europe, and a handful of Americans brave enough to defy the laws of their country to fight for an ally.

The battle that followed was long and bitter, as important as any fought in a thousand years of British history, but after three months of fighting the once- mighty Luftwaffe had been held at bay and defeated - because now there could be no invasion. The Battle of Britain wasn’t ‘the end of the beginning’, as Churchill would later describe victory at El Alamein, but it did mark the beginning of hope. And with hope came resilience and a steadfast resolve that would, in the end, lead to victory.

Working with a combination of graphite and coloured paints on ‘buff’ coloured paper to create a unique sepia effect, Robert Taylor’s outstanding Masterwork brings to life a moment during September 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. With an intuition unsurpassed by his peers, the world’s foremost aviation artist depicts a group of battle-weary Spitfire pilots from 92 Squadron after a long day’s fighting. Exhausted, they wait whilst ground crews hastily re-fuel and re-arm their aircraft at Biggin Hill ready for the next combat. No one knows when the alarm will sound but, when it does, they will, as always, be ready.

ACE OF ACES GICLÉE CANVAS PROOF by Robert Taylor

On 8 May 1945, the last day of the war in Europe, Erich Hartmann took off for one final mission. Over the city of Brno in Czechoslovakia, he spotted a pair of enemy Yak-9s performing impromptu aerobatics for Soviet troops on the ground. Hartmann, however, upstaged the show and promptly shot one of them down! It was his 352nd aerial victory, a total never likely to be surpassed.

To achieve such feats his tactics were simple – ‘Get in so close and you cannot miss’. Words easily said, but doing so required extreme courage and exceptional flying skills, qualities that Hartmann possessed in abundance. During some 1400 combat missions in the hazardous skies over the Eastern Front he was never shot down through enemy action yet still survived 14 crash-landings, many were the result of damage from the flying debris of his victims.

Flying Bf109s for his entire career, almost exclusively with JG52, Erich Hartmann never lost a wingman and, awarded the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds, became one of the Luftwaffe’s most highly decorated Aces. It is said that his reputation and the sight of his all-too-familiar Messerschmitt, nose adorned with his distinctive ‘Black Tulip’ markings, was enough to make many an enemy pilot take to their heels. Most, however, never got a chance to escape.

EAGLES WINGS by Richard Taylor

Honed by the Condor Legion during the Spanish Civil War and put into practice in the conquest of Poland, the Messerschmitt Bf109 was one of the most advanced fighters of its time; well-armed with an all-metal monocoque construction, an enclosed all-weather cockpit, retractable landing gear and a liquid-cooled inverted engine, it formed the backbone of the Luftwaffe’s Fighter Arm.

Constantly upgraded, its eternal battles with the Spitfire and Mustang lasted until the last day of the war. By then it was almost obsolete, having been superseded first by the Fw190 and then the Me262 jets, however with 33,984 built, more Bf109s were produced than any other fighter aircraft in history.

WINGS OF GLORY - 2019 CALENDAR by The Military Gallery

The Military Gallery calendars have quickly become essential for all Aviation and Military enthusiasts. Each calendar features twelve outstanding paintings, specially selected from the Military Gallery’s unrivaled archives.

THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2019 CALENDAR by The Military Gallery

The Military Gallery calendars have quickly become essential for all Military enthusiasts, featuring twelve outstanding paintings, specially selected from the Military Gallery’s unrivaled archives.

TOP BOUNCE by Robert Taylor

Under clear skies, a light breeze from the south-west blew across the grass airstrip. It was Thursday 5 March 1936 and K5054 – the prototype of R. J. Mitchell’s beautiful Spitfire fighter – was about to make its maiden flight.

Vickers Chief Test Pilot 'Mutt' Summers climbed into the cockpit and fired up the new 12-cylinder, liquid-cooled Rolls-Royce Merlin engine which roared into life with an unmistakable and soon-to-be-familiar sound. It was just after 4.30pm when Summers fully opened the throttle and K5054 surged forward and took to the air, the shape of its thin aero-dynamic elliptical wings soon apparent to all on the ground below. One of the most perfect fighting machines of all time had been born, and not a moment too soon because the dark clouds of war were gathering over Europe and the Spitfire would be on the front line during the nation’s darkest hour – the Battle of Britain.

So perfect was Mitchell’s design that no fewer than 40 Spitfire variants were developed, more than any other British fighter in history and the only one to remain in production before, during and after the war. But there were obstacles along the way, none more so than in late 1941.

‘The Fw190 certainly gave the British a shock’ wrote Douglas Bader, and RAF Fighter Command was soon forced to scale back their sweeps over France whilst the engineers from Supermarine and Rolls-Royce raced to catch up. It took months, but by June 1942 the first of a new variant began arriving which, everyone hoped, was the answer to the Fw190 – the Mk.IX Spitfire.

One of the first units to re-equip was 64 Squadron, chosen by the world’s foremost aviation artist Robert Taylor for his classic masterwork, depicting the day when the Mk.IXs hit back. It was 30 July 1942 over Boulogne when 64 Squadron, acting as top cover, spotted a group of a dozen Fw190s about 2,000ft below them. Bouncing the enemy from above, Don Kingaby, one of the RAF’s most iconic fighter Aces and the only airman to be awarded three DFMs, advanced further into the record books by downing one of the Fw190s. It was the first victory for the new Mk.IX Spitfire which would also become the first Allied aircraft to shoot down an Me262 jet.


PACIFIC GLORY by Anthony Saunders

On 23 December 1942, just days after their infamous attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese captured Wake Island, a small, but strategic coral atoll in the western Pacific.

The small garrison of mainly US Marines had already repulsed one landing but, on 23 December, the Japanese succeeded. Wake fell, as had Guam before it and now, across the breadth of the south-west Pacific, islands large and small tumbled like dominos, as did Hong Kong, Malaya, Singapore, Java and Burma. By March Australia stood on the brink of invasion and the might of Imperial Japan seemingly reigned supreme.

But Pearl Harbor was a hollow victory. Although the US Navy had suffered a calamity, the Japanese had failed to destroy the American carriers; a legacy that would soon return to haunt them. After stalemate at the Battle of the Coral Sea, there was no doubt of the outcome at the Battle of Midway where the American carriers inflicted a catastrophic defeat on the Japanese, who lost four carriers, a heavy cruiser, over 300 aircraft and 5,000 officers and men.

Fought at the beginning of June 1942, Midway marked the turning of the tide; the US Navy, its aviators and the Marines were back, stronger and more determined than ever. From now on the Japanese would be on the defensive. Over the next two years, the US Navy would build the largest naval force the Pacific had ever seen and one by one, island by island, base by base, the Allies would slowly advance in some of the bloodiest and most costly campaigns of World War 2. The Japanese now faced only the spectre of humiliation and defeat.

APPROACH TO THE MÖHNE DAM by Anthony Saunders

With the threat from Hitler’s increasingly belligerent regime growing, minds within Britain’s Air Ministry had already identified potential targets should the unthinkable happen and war with Germany become a reality. The list included the great dams of western Germany, some of the largest in the world.

On 9 September 1939 Hitler’s armies invaded Poland and, as Britain once again found herself at war with Germany, plans to attack the dams became a reality. Three were chosen as primary targets; the Möhne, Eder and Sorpe dams which between them controlled the vast supplies of water to the factories and manufacturing industries of the Ruhr. If these dams could be destroyed, the beating heart of industrial Germany would be dealt a heavy blow.

But there were problems; the range and dam defences were too great for a low-level attack by existing aircraft and commando raids were thought suicidal, with little chance of success. Barnes Wallis, however, had an idea – a cylindrical ‘bouncing bomb’ codenamed Upkeep – a mine designed to skip across the surface of the water clearing the torpedo nets, and explode against a dam wall at a depth that would cause maximum destruction.

To deliver his weapon, however, would require men of extraordinary flying skills, and an aircraft big enough for the job. By March 1943 all the criteria had been met; Upkeep was ready and tested, a new special squadron numbered 617 had been formed under Wing Commander Guy Gibson, and Avro’s mighty Lancaster bomber was up to the task. On the evening of 16 May 1943, after weeks of intensive training, Gibson led the first wave of bombers away from RAF Scampton and set course for the Moehne dam. The Dambuster raid had begun.

Anthony Saunders’ painting, Approach to the Möhne Dam, already hailed as a masterpiece of aviation art and one of the most authentic interpretations of events yet created, captures the moment when the fate of the Mohne dam was sealed.

DAMBUSTERS – THE IMPOSSIBLE MISSION GICLÉE CANVAS PROOF by Robert Taylor

All was quiet in the Ruhr valley on the night of 16/17 May 1943. Bright moonlight illuminated the night sky and the normally dark waters of the huge lakes, held back by the mighty dams, glinted brightly. The scene was somewhat different at RAF Scampton as nineteen Lancasters and 133 men from the recently formed 617 Squadron prepared to carry out a series of precision raids deep behind enemy lines. This highly secret mission went under the code name Operation Chastise, but the world would come to know it as the Dambusters Raid!

The peace at the Möhne Dam was shattered soon after midnight when Guy Gibson in Lancaster AJ-G made the first attack. The flak gunners, relaxing in their turrets, had no idea what was to come. One-by-one, following Gibson’s lead, the modified Lancasters flew into a curtain of deadly gunfire and somehow maintained a precise height of 60ft and speed of 230mph – calibrated perfectly to allow their Barnes Wallis designed bouncing bomb to strike the dam wall, sink and explode.

Robert Taylor’s aviation masterpiece depicts the moment that “Dingy” Young in Lancaster AJ-A releases his cylindrical, hydrostatically-triggered mine – clearly visible against the huge splash as it hits the water. The mighty Möhne Dam has but moments to live.

THE DAMBUSTERS – THREE GOOD BOUNCES GICLÉE CANVAS PROOF by Robert Taylor

Within seconds of successfully releasing their Upkeep bouncing bomb, “Dinghy” Young and the crew of AJ-A ‘Apple’ are hurtling over the damaged fortress-like wall of the Möhne, the largest dam in Europe controlling a vital source of water to the industries of the Ruhr valley.

As AJ-A clears the dam, Commanding Officer Guy Gibson flying alongside noted that Young’s bomb made ‘three good bounces’ before striking the dam wall in exactly the right position. It will quickly sink alongside the granite blocks before the hydro-static fuse detonates the mighty weapon. In the foreground, with lights on, Gibson helps draw some of the remaining enemy fire as he continues to sow doubt into the already confused German garrison. Below them all the Möhne’s power station burns, a result of John Hopgood’s attack in Lancaster AJ-M whose bomb bounced over the dam wall hitting the hydro-electric station.

BOMBING UP TOMMY by Richard Taylor

Operation Chastise - the famous attacks on the great dams of the Ruhr valley by the Lancasters of 617 Sqn are known as perhaps the most daring precision air raid in history. As a fitting tribute, Richard Taylor's outstanding painting depicts the scene just a few hours before departure, on the afternoon of 16 May 1943 at RAF Scampton as the hardworking ground crews of 617 Squadron ready their Lancasters in preparation for the night’s raid.

In the foreground Lancaster AJ-T ‘Tommy’ is loaded with Barnes Wallis’ ingenious ‘Upkeep’ bouncing bomb which will later be called into use by Pilot Joe McCarthy. After their original aircraft AJ-Q ‘Queenie’ developed a last minute coolant leak McCarthy and his crew switched to Lancaster AJ-T which as a reserve aircraft was not fitted with the twin Aldis lamps needed to calculate the correct height; Bomb Aimer George ‘Johnny’ Johnson and the crew knew that once they reached the target the odds would be stacked against them. Nevertheless with dogged determination they finally got airborne at 22.01 hrs and headed for their target – the Sorpe Dam.

‘Concentration was key and everyone was playing his part. Joe never took us above about 100 feet or below 200mph, with Bill (Radcliffe, the Flight Engineer) coaxing every last morsel of performance out of the Merlins to try to make up time.’
George ‘Johnny’ Johnson MBE DFM


After nine aborted attempts, ‘Johnny’ was satisfied enough to release their bomb and at 00.46 hrs on the morning of 17 May, they scored a direct hit!

DAMBUSTERS – ‘GONER 58A’ by Robert Taylor

The aim was to destroy the great dams of western Germany. Many thought it mission impossible, but they underestimated the men of the newly-formed 617 Squadron – The Dambusters.

The story of RAF Bomber Command’s audacious attack on the great dams of western Germany continues to inspire long after the events that took place on the night of 16 / 17 May 1943 – and with good reason. Few wartime missions have replicated the skill, courage and bravery demonstrated that night and the Dambusters have rightly gained legendary status.

Codenamed Operation Chastise, the mission was to be carried out by 617 Squadron, a newly-formed unit established for the sole purpose of destroying primarily the Möhne, Eder, and Sorpe dams in the Ruhr valley. The resulting flooding to the factories, roads, railways and canals of the Ruhr, and subsequent disruption of hydro-electric power, would be immense.

Commanded by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, the unit’s task was unenviable, requiring supreme skills and undertaking enormous risks: they were to fly Lancasters, the largest bomber in the RAF’s arsenal, at night, at tree-top height across heavily- defended enemy territory to deliver a revolutionary new weapon – a ‘bouncing’ bomb, codename Upkeep. Designed by the aeronautical genius Barnes Wallis, the bomb would skip across the water before detonating against the dam wall. To launch that weapon the pilot must hold his aircraft precisely 60ft above the water whilst maintaining a constant, fixed airspeed of 210 mph, and the targets would be defended by flak or almost impossible terrain.

Robert Taylor’s dramatic work in graphite and paint – originally created as the working drawing for his acclaimed painting Three Good Bounces – depicts a moment during Flight Lieutenant Mick Martin’s attack on the Möhne Dam. With two attacks already made Martin, flying AJ-P, releases his Upkeep while Gibson in Lancaster AJ-G flies off his starboard beam in an attempt to draw some of the enemy flak. It was unsuccessful; his radio operator tapping out ‘Goner-5-8-A’ (the code for - ‘Special weapon released’) ‘exploded 50 yards from target’ – ‘no apparent breach’ – ‘target A’.

It would require two more attacks, from ‘Dinghy’ Young in AJ-A and David Maltby in AJ-J, before the weakened dam was finally breached, sending a tidal wave of water into the valley below. For Gibson it wasn’t over; he will lead the remaining crews to successfully breach the next target, the Eder dam.

Robert Taylor’s skill and artistry reflects his intimate and authentic knowledge of the events that took place on that epic, moonlit night in May 1943. Over the past four decades he has enjoyed the company of almost every man to survive Operation Chastise, has listened to their stories first-hand, and counted many of them as friends. The knowledge acquired, and the friendships gained have, without doubt, given Robert an unparalleled insight into the legendary Dambusters.

NO MANS LAND - A BOOK & PRINT PORTFOLIO by Richard Taylor

On Friday 15 September 1916, during the Battle of the Somme, a new, unnerving sound was heard on the Western Front; a deep mechanical rumble accompanied by the ominous clanking of metal. Approaching their trench positions on the front line between the villages of Flers and Courcelette, German soldiers could see strange heavily-armoured vehicles lumbering slowly towards them.

Traversing the scarred and pitted landscape of No Man’s Land with ungainly ease, the mammoth 28-ton beasts crushed the barbed wire defences that had, until now, stopped the British infantry in its tracks; targets to be mown down with impunity. Now, however, all the German rifle and machine gun fire could do was ricochet ineffectually of thick metal plates.

Then these lumbering machines opened fire, spewing death and destruction from two six-pounders and four machine guns. For the first time in the history of warfare an enemy was witnessing an attack by a ‘tank’; and the Germans fled.

Designed by the British as the ultimate weapon with which to break the bloody stalemate along much of the Western Front, these new armoured machines had been constructed in great secrecy under the guise of motorised water tanks; and the name ‘tank’ was adopted. Initially they were slow, unreliable and diffi cult to operate but as the war progressed tanks became faster and more dependable. It wasn’t long before they came to prominence.

In November 1917 the British launched a blistering offensive during the Battle of Cambrai, combining their infantry, artillery, tanks and aircraft in what is probably the first-ever display of wholly ‘integrated’ warfare. Germany responded slowly and the first ever tank-vs-tank battle took place on 24 April 1918 between German A7Vs and British Mk.IVs at Villers- Bretonneux. But by the time the Allies carried out their fi nal offensive through the summer of 1918, they deployed hundreds of tanks which were instrumental in sending the German army reeling, and finally sue for peace.

Following the highly successful release The Front, acclaimed artist Richard Taylor has created another powerful pencil drawing in memory of the Allied soldiers and Tank crews who fought in the muddy morass of the Western Front. With an unsurpassed eye for detail he portrays a scene following the German Spring Offensive of 1918 where, in a landscape left broken and scarred by recent heavy fighting, troops attempt to recover an 18-pounder Gun. Helped by the presence of tanks, the British army has advanced into what was previously No Man’s Land, whilst overhead Sopwith Camels patrol the newly-won territory.

REACH FOR THE SKIES by Robert Taylor

In 1931 Douglas Bader, then a brilliant 21 year old RAF pilot, crashed in a Bristol Bulldog fighter in a flying accident and lost both legs. At the outbreak of war his relentless persistence saw him re-join the RAF and by 1940 he was leading the famous 242 Sqn in the Battle of Britain. He then went on to cmmand the famous Tangmere Wing and at the time he was shot down and taken POW in August 1941, he was a leading Ace with 24 victories and one of the most famous RAF Fighter pilots. After being interned in a number of prison camps (including Stallag Luft III) his persistent escape attempts saw him finish the war in Colditz. After the war he became a household name and his Foundation gave a huge amount of support and encouragement to other limbless people.

Robert Taylor’s famous painting depicts legendary Ace, Douglas Bader flying his Mk.Va Spitfire high above the coast of Northern France in 1941.


ALMOST HOME by Robert Taylor

"…night after night, month after month, our bomber squadrons travel far into Germany, find their targets, often under the heaviest fire, often with serious loss, with deliberate, careful discrimination, and inflict shattering blows upon the whole of the technical and war-making structure of the Nazi power. On no part of the Royal Air Force does the weight of the war fall more heavily than on the daylight bombers…"
Winston Churchill

With these words the British Prime Minister reminded the House of Commons of the heroic role undertaken by the young men of RAF Bomber Command during World War II as they set out across the North Sea to wreak havoc upon the enemy. And the cost they bore – for the odds of a safe return were, at best, marginal.

One aircraft above all came to symbolise the valiant deeds that these young men undertook – the mighty Avro Lancaster. Introduced in early 1942, it quickly became the backbone of Bomber Command and it wasn’t long before a score of airfields across the east of England reverberated to the sound of its four mighty Merlin engines.

Almost Home recreates a scene that was familiar to anyone in Bomber Command. A lone 9 Squadron Lancaster, separated from the main force during a punishing mission to Germany in late 1944, returns to safety. The weary crew are no doubt relieved to see familiar fields beneath them as they approach their base at RAF Bardney. 9 Squadron had received their Lancasters in September 1942 and became a leading unit within Bomber Command. Working on operations alongside 617 Squadron, they specialised in dropping Barnes Wallis’s famous 12,000lb ‘Tallboy’ bombs, including the successful mission to sink the German battleship Tirpitz.

This previously unreleased work was commissioned by a crew member of the featured Lancaster in 1984, the decade that saw artist Robert Taylor shoot to international renown as the world’s most widely collected aviation artist. A timeless and poignant classic, Almost Home has been selected from the Military Gallery Archives to commemorate the Centenary of the Royal Air Force. The world’s oldest independent air force, the RAF was formed towards the end of WWI on 1 April 1918, when the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Naval Air Service merged to create what was then the largest air force in the world. Since then the RAF has played a significant role in British military history.


CRACK ACE by Robert Taylor

Ace: a fighter pilot who has shot down five or more enemy aircraft in combat.

The Luftwaffe had so many Aces that the number runs into the thousands. The list includes many whose impressive tallies will never be surpassed, names that are recorded for posterity: men such as top- scorer Erich Hartmann with 352 victories, Gerhard Barkhorn who also surpassed the 300 victory mark and Günther Rall, who surely would have done so but for injury. Along with others such as Erich Rudorffer who flew over 1,000 combat missions and was shot down sixteen times whilst achieving his tally of 222 victories; he somehow managed to survive but many didn’t.

Unlike their RAF and US counterparts, the highly-skilled and battle-honed Luftwaffe ‘experten’ were not rested from combat to recuperate and hand their knowledge on to a new generation, before returning to the fray. They fought until the end; there was no respite unless you were wounded, shot down and taken prisoner – or killed in action; which many were.

Men such as Major Helmut Wick who, had he lived, might have surpassed them all.

A successful veteran of the Battle of France, he fought with distinction in the Battle of Britain and was only the fourth recipient of the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves. He was the youngest Major in the Luftwaffe when he was appointed Geschwaderkommodore of JG2 ‘Richthofen’, again the youngest ever to hold this position. But, like so many others, his exceptional career and meteoric rise would come to an end. On 28 November 1940 his luck ran out when, with a staggering 56 air combat victories to his credit - at the time, the top-scoring Luftwaffe pilot ever - he was shot down and killed by the RAF Ace John Dundas, during an engagement over the English Channel. Dundas was himself immediately shot down and killed.

Helmut Wick is the subject of Robert Taylor’s brilliantly composed Crack Ace, the latest release in his increasingly collectible series of Masterwork drawings. With his unrivalled skill using his striking graphite and paint combination, Robert portrays the top Ace shortly after his appointment as Geschwaderkommodore of JG2 ‘Richthofen’, describing the outcome of a recent duel with a Spitfire to his fellow officers.


CRACK ACE - THE MATTED COLLECTOR'S EDITION by Robert Taylor

Crack Ace is the latest book and print portfolio in Robert Taylor's increasingly collectible series of Masterwork drawings, created with unrivalled skill using his striking graphite and paint combination.

Each print is signed by a prominent Luftwaffe Fighter Pilot and issued with a matching-numbered copy of the book ARRIVAL OF EAGLES.

The prints in the COLLECTOR'S EDITION AND ARTIST PROOFS are conservation matted to include the original signatures of four famous Luftwaffe Aces who flew Bf109s during WWII and the matching-numbered book contains a special collector's bookplate autographed by another legendary Luftwaffe Ace.

STRUGGLE FOR SUPREMACY – GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Despite their failed attempt to seize the initiative during the Battle of the Bulge, by January 1945 it was obvious to all but the diehard Nazis that Germany would lose the war, and day after day, night after night, the Allied air forces had pounded the enemy war machine. It was a relentless assault yet, undeterred by the lack of fuel, supplies and experienced pilots, the Luftwaffe doggedly fought on. If the Allies had air superiority, nobody had told the determined pilots of the Luftwaffe, because in January 1945 the skies over Germany were both dangerous and deadly.

Robert Taylor’s iconic image Struggle for Supremacy takes us back to one of the intense air battles of that time. Set against a majestic Robert Taylor skyscape, P-51 Mustangs from the 357th Fighter Group had been escorting heavy bombers when they spotted a large formation of enemy Bf109s. The painting depicts Captain Robert Foy of the 363rd Fighter Squadron as he takes on one of the enemy fighters in a daring head-on pass; below, P-47s of the 56th Fighter Group climb to join the fray and give much-needed support.

COMBAT OVER THE REICH – GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Had the Me262 been developed solely as an interceptor it would have blunted the ever increasing, deep-penetration American daylight bomber raids into Germany. It might even have slowed the advance long enough to alter the course of the war. But Hitler under Goring’s advice, refused to bend in his belief that the new wonder jet should be used as a bomber. By the time he relented in November 1944, it was too late.

Using the remarkable skills that have made him the most collected aviation artist in history, Robert Taylor graphically brings to life the potency of the Luftwaffe’s radical new jet in his famous painting, Combat Over The Reich.

Set against a breathtakingly beautiful aerial panorama, he vividly depicts a heart-stopping drama that took place on 19 March 1945. It was the day when a force of 28 Me262 jet fighters from JG7 intercepted a formation of B-17s of the 452nd Bomb Group en route to bomb the oil refinery at Zwickau, 60 miles south of Dresden. Closing at a speed almost three times as fast as their targets, each jet pilot has but a fraction of a second to find his mark and the B-17 gunners have milliseconds to respond. Within the blink of an eye the interception is over. The main B-17 has lost part of its tailplane but with luck and a skilful pilot, the battered bomber will make it home. The encounter occurred during a five-day period when the small band of Me262 fighter pilots were credited with over 50 Allied aircraft destroyed. But the damage inflicted by the Me262s was too late – within weeks Germany had surrendered.

HEADLONG INTO THE CLASH by Robert Taylor

14 January 1945; and the war was not going well for Germany. The noose was tightening as American, British and Canadian armies, having broken out from their Normandy landings seven months earlier, stood on the banks of the Rhine. In the east vast numbers of Russians were driving relentlessly towards Berlin. On their bomb-cratered airfields the Luftwaffe prepared for the final onslaught during the Defense of the Reich.

Despite the shock of Operation Bodenplatte on New Year’s Eve – the Luftwaffe’s unexpected yet unsuccessful attempt to wipe out the Allied air forces on their advanced airfields in the Low Countries – Germany had all but surrendered air superiority to the Allies. Today, therefore, was yet another gamble as they assembled some 200 fighters to counter nearly 900 Eighth Air Force bombers, and almost as many fighter escorts, tasked with destroying oil refineries, storage depots and other strategic targets in central Germany. For the Luftwaffe the day was to end in retreat and disaster; they lost 161 fighters, the highest number ever recorded. Never again would the once mighty Jagdverbänd rise in strength to challenge the Mighty Eighth.

Few artists can capture the ferocity of an aerial battle with the skill and ability of Robert Taylor, and this breath-taking painting will undoubtedly rank as one of the pinnacles in his long and distinguished career. He captures a moment during that massive aerial battle in January 1945 near Ludwigslust in northern Germany, as enemy fighters from JG300 and JG301 make a head-on attack through a close formation of B-17s from the 390th Bomb Group who are heading to bomb Magdeburg. But their ever-vigilant P-51 escorts are aware of the threat and quickly engage the enemy with devastating results.

In the centre of the action Flt Lt Joe Peterburs of the 20th Fighter Group screams past the Bf109G of Lt Bruno Klostermann from II./JG300 who is attempting to penetrate the bomber formation. Peterburs claimed an Fw190 during the battle, Klostermann, however, will not survive the day.

DEVOTION TO DUTY by Richard Taylor

A Lancaster from 61 Squadron, heavily damaged by German night-fighter attacks, heads to Dusseldorf during a bombing mission on the night of 3 November 1943. Although badly wounded, pilot Bill Reid and his crew pressed on to bomb their target before returning home. For his courage and devotion to duty Reid was awarded the Victoria Cross.

FOR FREEDOM by Richard Taylor

The men who served so bravely in Bomber Command came not only from Britain but from all over the free world. Their unswerving courage, devotion to duty and the extraordinary contribution they made between 1939 and 1945 was beyond measure. In fact, without RAF Bomber Command there would have been no final victory in Europe.

It was a heroic yet often deadly role – of the 125,000 men who served in Bomber Command, 55,573 made the ultimate sacrifice – a casualty figure only surpassed by those who served in the Kriegsmarine’s U-boats.

And the aircraft that many of these airmen flew from 1942 onwards was the legendary Avro Lancaster, known as the backbone of Bomber Command. It was probably the greatest heavy bomber of World War II and Sir Arthur Harris, Commander in Chief of RAF Bomber Command, believed that the Lancaster, powered by its four mighty Merlin engines, was ‘the greatest single factor in winning the war’. “Without your genius and efforts” he wrote of the Lancaster crews, “we could not have prevailed”.

It is therefore fitting that Richard Taylor has chosen the Lancaster in his moving limited edition, to represent all those who served with Bomber Command during World War II. Depicted are the aircraft of 106 Squadron whose motto Pro Libertate – ‘For Freedom’ – not only gives title to the painting, but perhaps symbolises the driving force behind so many of these brave young men who faced such daunting odds.

LONG HAUL TO BERLIN by Anthony Saunders

The Americans gave us the best they had, and they gave us everything we needed as and when the need arose… they were the bravest of the brave, and I know that I am speaking for my own bomber crews when I pay this tribute.

MRAF Sir Arthur Harris

Through bitter experience and heavy losses, RAF Bomber Command had all but forsaken daylight bombing in favor of night operations, but their American allies thought otherwise. Ever since the USAAF had arrived in England it had continued to hone its skill of bombing by day. Churchill, however, remained skeptical.

Until, that is, January 1943 when at the Casablanca conference, US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill decided to pursue a united bomber offensive directed against Germany itself. Brigadier Ira C. Eaker proposed that “if the RAF continues night bombing, and we bomb by day, we shall bomb them around the clock and the devil shall get no rest.”

The heroics of the American bomber crews were already legend but now, flying much of the trip over Germany without escort, the cost was heavy. As soon as their P-47 and P-38 escorts turned for home low on fuel, the Luftwaffe pounced. The American airmen were forced to endure a savage onslaught not only from enemy fighters, but some of the heaviest flak imaginable. Missions such as Schweinfurt, Regensburg and Ploesti have gone down in history as testament to their bravery.

Then, in early 1944 a new fighter emerged – the long-range P-51 Mustang – one of the finest piston-engine fighters ever made. The massed formations of Fortresses and Liberators now had protection anywhere over Germany, and especially the capital of the Reich – Berlin. And one of the foremost close escort units of the war was the 332nd Fighter Group – the famed Tuskegee Airmen. Made up of African American pilots, this renowned unit earned a formidable reputation for protecting their bombers and became one of the most highly respected fighter groups of WWII.

THE FRONT - A BOOK & PRINT PORTFOLIO by Richard Taylor

In the early hours of Thursday 21 March 1918 a thunderous barrage shook the Western Front. In the space of just five hours a million artillery shells – over 3000 every minute – detonated amidst the lines held by an exhausted and overstretched British Fifth Army which, by the Spring of 1918, had found itself in a gruesome stalemate with its enemy. Although well used to the horrors and degradation of battle, those in the trenches were stunned by the savagery of the German attack as chlorine and mustard gas blew through the British ranks.

With the war against Russia over, more than half a million German troops had been released and General Erich Ludendorff, the German commander, intended to use them to maximum effect on Western Front. He had planned a swift and colossal offensive to crush the Allies once and for all.

The British lines initially broke under the weight of the attack but, after weeks of intense fighting the German push was halted. Facing increasingly stiff resistance, German casualties mounted as the British dug in and fought back - heroically. During the Spring Offensive no less than fifty-seven Allied soldiers were awarded the Victoria Cross.

It was now the Germans who suffered and between March and July 1918 they lost more than a million men. With fresh American divisions now pouring into France Ludendorff’s great gamble had failed and the German army was finally defeated. By the autumn, with its army in full retreat, Germany sued for peace. An armistice was signed and, at 11.00am on Friday 11 November 1918, the guns on the Western Front finally fell silent.

Internationally acclaimed for his astonishing pencil work, Richard Taylor has created a tribute to the millions who fought during World War I. This moving portrayal of a shattered infantry taking advantage of a brief lull during the heavy fighting is exceptional in its attention to detail, contrasting the drab, beleaguered position with the colourful markings on a pair of Sopwith Camels from 9 Sqn RFC scouting overhead.

THE FINAL SHOW by Robert Taylor

In May 1944 Wing Commander Roland ‘Bee’ Beamont led three squadrons of Hawker Tempests into operations for the first time. Flying from RAF Newchurch in Kent, one of the advanced landing grounds constructed in preparation for the invasion of France, they formed 150 Wing RAF.

The far-sighted Beamont had almost single- handedly overseen the transformation of the Hawker Typhoon into the most potent ground attack aircraft of its day before turning his attention to its successor – the Tempest. With thinner wings, greater range, improved ailerons, a redesigned windscreen and all-round ‘rear vision’ canopy it was a significant improvement on the Typhoon.

Through the last year of the war the unwavering pilots who flew these two mighty aircraft became the scourge of the German Army, blasting their way through armoured formations, destroying airfields, shipping, barges, bridges, trains, marshalling yards, rail hubs, anything to support the advancing British and Canadian armies as they battled their way through Belgium and the Netherlands towards the Rhine. And, as an increasingly desperate enemy fought back with V-1 ‘Doodlebug’ flying bombs, the Typhoon and Tempest pilots destroyed those too – 150 Wing alone accounting for 638 V-1s destroyed.

As the remnants of Hitler’s once-fabled army collapsed under the onslaught, many high-ranking Nazis were faced with a choice – go down fighting or cut and run. Many chose to run, heading north to the Baltic coast with one aim in mind – a last-chance passage to neutral Sweden. The Tempest pilots of 150 Wing, graphically portrayed in Robert Taylor’s painting, were amongst those tasked with stopping their escape.

Once again the world’s most collected aviation artist has produced an astounding work that is set to become the defining image of the Hawker Tempest. Some of the greatest pilots of the RAF flew this iconic aircraft and Robert has depicted the final combat of the war for one such pilot – the legendary fighter Ace Pierre Clostermann.

A Flight Commander with 3 Squadron, Clostermann is at the controls of his distinctive Tempest ‘Le Grand Charles’ during a strafing raid against the heavily-defended seaplane base at Grossenbrode, on the coast to the north of Lübeck. Having just destroyed two Dornier Do18 flying boats on the water, he now helps finish off a Bf109 and a Fw190 that have tried to pounce from above.

MOSQUITOS AT DUSK by Gerald Coulson

To celebrate more than forty years as the world's foremost aviation and military art publisher, we are delighted to present an outstanding Masterwork by Gerald Coulson, specially released from the archives of the Military Gallery.

It was probably the most versatile aircraft of World War Two and the missions undertaken by the Mosquito and her crews have rarely been equalled for their daring or precision. Powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, the Mosquito was not only fast and agile – for most of the war it could out-perform anything in the sky – but deadly: possessing the ability to carry almost every weapon in the RAF’s arsenal. These qualities enabled Mosquito squadrons to perform every conceivable role from fighter-bomber to photo- reconnaissance, intruder, pathfinder, night-fighter, V-1 hunter, anti-shipping attacks and, thanks to its agility and speed, low-level precision strikes.

What made the Mosquito unique however is that it was built mainly of wood and, at a time when metal was in extremely short supply, was a triumph of construction. Using plywood and balsa de Havilland created a masterpiece, something that drove Reichsmarshal Herman Goering ‘green and yellow with envy’. ‘The British’ he fumed, ‘….who can afford aluminium better than we can, knock together a beautiful wooden aircraft that every piano factory over there is building, and they give it a speed which they have now increased yet again. What do you make of that? There is nothing the British do not have. They have the geniuses and we have the nincompoops’.

In tribute to this magnificent aircraft Gerald Coulson, one of the world’s most widely collected aviation artists for over 50 years, portrays a scene that was played out at airfields all over wartime Britain after the Mosquito entered widespread service in 1942. Coulson is as famous for his landscapes as his aviation works and this stunning painting captures the mood perfectly as the dimming light of dusk reflects off the dispersal area, and Mosquito crews make their final preparations for the night’s operations.

THE DAMBUSTERS - AND THE EPIC WARTIME RAIDS OF 617 SQUADRON by The Military Gallery

In the early hours of Monday 17 May 1943 one of the most daring low-level night time raids in the history of air warfare took place, when nineteen Lancaster crews from the newly formed 617 Squadron successfully attacked the great dams of Germany. Their audacious mission – codenamed Operation Chastise – gained them immediate fame and legendary status.

After the Dambusters Raid the squadron remained operational, becoming known as precision-bombing specialists, undertaking some of the most famous missions of WWII; the Dortmund-Ems Canal, Kembs Barrage and sinking of the mighty German Battleship Tirpitz are just a few of the countless operations carried out by the unit.

COUP DE GRACE
The book & print portfolio
by Anthony Saunders

The fifth aircraft to attack the Möhne dam on the night of 16 / 17 May 1943, Flt.Lt. David Maltby powers Lancaster AJ-J away from the target as his Upkeep mine successfully detonates against the already damaged dam wall. Within seconds the dam will rupture releasing a terrifying wall of water flooding into the valley below.

This prestigious limited edition portfolio, issued as a lasting tribute to the Dambusters and the men of 617 Squadron, includes an individually numbered copy of the book THE DAMBUSTERS.

Presented in its own luxury embossed slipcase, each book is accompanied by a matching-numbered copy of Anthony Saunders’ dramatic limited edition print COUP DE GRÂCE – THE MÖHNE DAM.

DESTINATION TOKYO by Anthony Saunders

The daylight raid on Tokyo, led by Lt Col James H. Doolittle on Sunday 18 April 1942, has rightfully entered the history books as one of the most daring and courageous operations of the Second World War. On that day, in mid ocean, Doolittle had launched his B-25 Mitchell bomber from the heaving, spray-soaked flight deck of an aircraft carrier, a deck too short to land on, and flown on to bomb Tokyo. He knew there would be no return to the USS Hornet, either for him or the 15 heavily- laden B-25s behind him, for this was a feat never before attempted, and for every crew member the mission was a one-way ticket. Yet, under the leadership of Jimmy Doolittle, they all dared to survive.

The mission for the 16 bombers was to bomb industrial targets in Tokyo and surrounding areas, to slow production of strategic war material, then fly on to land in the part of south-west China that was still in the hands of friendly Nationalist forces. All being well, the mission would be so unexpected it would plant the first seeds of doubt into enemy minds. It worked – the Japanese were forced to quickly divert hundreds of aircraft, men and equipment away from offensive operations to the defence of their homeland.

There was, however, another reason behind the Doolittle’s raid – to lift the morale of an American public devastated by the attack on Pearl Harbor four months earlier. And the success of the mission provided the boost that was needed. If any had doubted America’s resolve in the face of uncertainty, the courage, determination and heroism displayed by Lt Col Doolittle and his band of aviators restored their determination. Although it might take years, and the price would be high, America and her allies understood that the fight could, and would, be won.

Specially commissioned to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Doolittle Tokyo Raid in support of the James H. Doolittle Education Fund, Anthony’s inspirational painting portrays the dramatic moment that Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle lifts his B-25 off the pitching deck of the USS Hornet. Having timed his launch to perfection he climbs steeply away, ready to adjust his compass bearing for a direct line to Tokyo. On the sodden deck behind him the crews of the remaining 15 aircraft, whose engines are warmed, ready and turning, will quickly follow their commanding officer into the murky sky.

THE DOOLITTLE RAIDERS - GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

At 8.20am on April 18, 1942, just four months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, a small force of B-25 Mitchell bombers under the command of Col Jimmy Doolittle, undertook one of the most remarkable air raids of World War II. The Raiders’ orders were anything but simple: fly low level some 800 miles over water into Japanese territory without escort, attack targets in Tokyo and nearby, then, with insufficient fuel to return, fly towards China until they ran out of fuel, bail out and, finally, try to evade capture.

Every man knew the danger and Robert Taylor’s celebrated painting sets the scene as the Raiders leave the target area. The pilot drops lower to hug the landscape and opens the throttles as they head west. With luck the next stop is China!

Of the sixteen crews who took part in the Tokyo raid, eleven would bail out, three ditched off shore and two crash-landed. Most of the men would eventually return to freedom, but not all. Of the seven who never returned, three were killed in action, three were executed and one died in captivity having been taken Prisoners of War by the Japanese.

THIS SCEPTRED ISLE by Robert Taylor

For nearly a thousand years the white cliffs of southern England had taunted many a foreign army. These fortress walls of chalk, however, were defended by the moat-like waters of the Channel and together they had shielded the British from her enemies. Alongside Drake they had defied the armies of Spain and her great Armada and, in 1805, had halted the march of Napoleon’s Grande Armée. No enemy force since that of William the Conqueror in 1066 had successfully managed to cross the Channel in anger but, in May 1940, one of the most powerful armies the world had ever seen arrived at Calais. An invasion by Hitler’s all-conquering Wehrmacht was imminent – or so it seemed.

To cross the Channel and breach the English defences, the Luftwaffe simply had to gain control of the skies, and with massively superior numbers the outcome seemed inevitable. The fate of Britain lay in the hands of less than 3,000 young airmen from Fighter Command – Churchill’s ‘Few’.

By July the most famous air battle in history was underway and, over the next three months, under tranquil summer skies, the ‘Few’ battled to defend their Sceptred Isle. Impossibly outnumbered and flying daily to the point of exhaustion, by October these courageous young men had snatched victory and from the jaws of defeat, emerging defiantly victorious. The threat of invasion might be over but a terrible price had been paid – during that long battle for the survival of Britain 544 had been killed and 422 wounded; and of those who survived a further 814 would be killed before the end of the war.

It is to the valiant ‘Few’ that Robert Taylor once again pays tribute in this masterful painting portraying a fleeting moment of calm for the pilots of 74 (Tiger) Squadron during the height of the Battle of Britain. With his commanding officer Sailor Malan (ZP-A) to his right, Acting Flight Lieutenant John Freeborn (ZP-C) takes time to reflect on another day of intense combat while passing over the white cliffs and the familiar lighthouse at Beachy Head, as the squadron cross the English coast to head for home.

DAME VERA LYNN by

During the darkest days of WWII, as Hitler’s war machine attempted to pound Great Britain into submission, Vera Lynn became synonymous with the indomitable spirit of the British people. One of the most celebrated performers of the 1940s, her hugely popular radio shows, recordings and films endeared her to the public, helping to reinforce Prime Minister Winston Churchill’s ‘never give up’ spirit.

Performing such classic songs as ‘We’ll meet again’ and ‘The White Cliffs of Dover’ the ‘Forces Sweetheart’ made a significant contribution to the moral of British and Allied soldiers during WWII. Her unwavering support for the troops saw her performing tirelessly, travelling to Burma, Egypt and India, often in hostile conditions. In fact such was Vera Lynn’s universal appeal that many a Luftwaffe pilot risked disciplinary action to tune in to the BBC just to hear her voice.

LOOKING FOR TROUBLE by Robert Taylor

The Mustang was a triumph, testament to its designer Edgar Schmued. It was fast, manoeuvrable, hard-hitting and, by the time it was combined with Rolls-Royces’ legendary Merlin engine, was capable of outperforming anything the enemy could throw at it. When P-51s first appeared in the skies over Berlin, Hermann Goering was reported to have announced that he knew then the war was lost.

A special new breed of men flew the Mustang as the Allies pushed for victory in Europe. Tough, supremely confident, determined, and gloriously brave; it was an era that belonged to them and the P-51 helped produce some of the greatest Aces of WWII. Such iconic pilots as George Preddy, John Meyer, Don Blakeslee, Kit Carson and Bud Anderson scored all or most of their victories in this thoroughbred fighter.

To honor the heroic pilots who flew and fought in this iconic machine, Robert Taylor has chosen this classic portrait, completed with all of his usual mastery of his craft, in tribute to all USAAF units that flew the Mustang.

Set against a dramatic bank of clouds, Looking for Trouble bears all the hallmarks of a timeless Taylor masterpiece. P-51Ds of the 352nd Fighter Group with full long-range tanks slung under their wings, head out from their forward base in Belgium on an extended sweep east of the Rhine crossing on the lookout for enemy aircraft, in the spring of 1945.

HOME AT DUSK - GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

It is winter 1944 and the snow has brought a special quiet to the English countryside in the late evening twilight. The war seems a world away until the tranquility is shattered by the unmistakable roar of Merlin engines, bringing about a harsh reminder of the realities of war-torn Europe. As dusk gathers and just feet above the gently waving reeds of the East Anglian fens, P-51 Mustangs sprint for home bearing the scars of the day’s battle; soon the tensions of aerial combat will be forgotten for a few hours, melting into an evening of camaraderie. Tomorrow will be a new day.

Robert Taylor’s classic Masterwork depicts this life of extremes lived to the full by a special breed of men who flew this iconic fighter as the Allies pushed for victory in Europe during the final stages of WWII. Tough, supremely confident, determined, and gloriously brave; it was an era that belonged to them and an era that is immortalized by the spell-binding artistry of the world’s leading military and aviation artist.

BROKEN SILENCE - GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

As dusk brought the end to the day’s action for some, it was just the beginning of things to come for many others. RAF raids continued throughout the night as the heavy bombers headed for targets across occupied Europe supported by one of the most versatile aircraft of them all; the DeHavilland Mosquito. Its speed was enviable and it soon became the finest multi-role combat aircraft of WWII.

Internationally hailed as one of Robert Taylor’s most iconic paintings, Broken Silence depicts a scene typical in Norfolk, England during the summer and autumn of 1943 as two pairs of Mosquito B.IVs, each powered by two phenomenal Rolls-Royce Merlin Engines, head out over the East Anglian fens on a low-level precision strike against enemy targets in Holland.


ATTACKING THE SORPE DAM by Richard Taylor

Richard’s stunning pencil drawing, completed on buff paper with colour highlights, depicts Lancaster AJ-F, piloted by Canadian Ken Brown, powering away from the Sorpe Dam as a huge plume of water erupts behind it. This was the second and final attack on the impenetrable dam which just a few hours earlier was attacked by ‘Johnny’ Johnson’s Lancaster AJ-T. Both aircraft scored direct hits.

THE BLOND KNIGHT by Robert Taylor

During an astonishing three year period on the Eastern Front Erich Hartmann downed 352 enemy aircraft to become the highest- scoring Ace in history. It is a record likely to stand for all time.

Posted to JG52 over Russia in August 1942 his new Kommodore, Dieter Hrabak, placed the novice pilot under the guidance of ‘Paule’ Rossman, one of the unit’s most experienced and respected Aces. However during his very first combat Hartmann became so disorientated that he got lost in cloud and ran out of fuel. His undoubted skill as a pilot enabled him to survive the inevitable crash-landing, but a few days later and just minutes after scoring his first-ever victory, he was shot down – again crash-landing. This time he only just escaped from his burning aircraft before it exploded.

Any other new pilot might have succumbed but Hartmann was made of sterner stuff and, with Rossman’s help and guidance, it wasn’t long before everyone in JG52 realised that he possessed exceptional skill.

By the summer of 1943 ‘the Blond Knight’ and his colleagues were flying up to six missions a day and having now perfected his technique, it was unusual for him to finish a day without a victory. Never claiming to be an expert marksman, his approach, which took nerves of steel and great flying skills, was to get as close to his enemy as possible before opening fire at the last minute. Often flying ‘head on’, the risks of collision and damage were great – of the sixteen times Hartmann was brought down, eight were as a result of flying into the debris of his victim!

Hartmann’s 352 victories were achieved with JG52 – all except one. It happened during a brief two week spell at the beginning of February 1945 when the top Ace was placed in temporary command of I./JG53. His new unit were based in Hungary where German Army Group South was in bitter retreat and the fighting was as tough and relentless as ever.

Following up on HUNTERS AT DAWN this is the second release in the pair of limited editions and Robert Taylor’s atmospheric painting portrays Erich Hartmann climbing out of his Bf109 G-6 at Weszperem’s snow-covered airfield after returning from another arduous mission leading Stab I./JG53 with whom, on 4 February he downed a Yak-9. It was his 337th victory.

HUNTERS AT DAWN by Robert Taylor

It became known as the most exclusive club in the history of air combat – the Three Hundred Club!

Those Aces with over 100 victories were exceptional; to reach 200 victories was a spectacular achievement. Yet two men went even further shooting down more than 300 enemy aircraft which placed them in a league of their own. They were the elite of the elite, and their names are legendary – Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn.

It is no surprise that these iconic Aces scored their victories whilst flying with the legendary fighter wing JG52 and the Geschwader boasted some of greatest Luftwaffe pilots of WWII among its ranks – including the top three Aces of all time. Such renowned pilots as Gunther Rall (275 victories), Wilhelm Batz (237 victories), Hermann Graf (212 victories) and Helmut Lipfert (203 victories) helped this formidable unit notch up more than 10,000 victories making it the most successful fighter wing in history.

Robert Taylor, the world’s premier aviation artist, has created a stunning portfolio dedicated to the two highest scoring fighter pilots of all time. Hunters at Dawn is the first release in this pair and features Hptm. Gerhard Barkhorn, Gruppenkommandeur of II./JG52. The great Ace, flying his Bf109 G- 6, leads the Stab as they climb out from their base near the Black Sea, early November 1943. The crisp air of day break is temporarily punctuated by the roar of Daimler-Benz engines as the deadly Messerschmitt fighters set off on their daily hunt for Soviet aircraft over the front line.

The legendary Gruppenkommandeur was by now close to his 200th victory, a feat he achieved on 30 November 1943. Even then little did he or his comrades know that this was only a temporary milestone in his exceptional combat career – although the enemy might have feared it.

FORTRESS AT REST by Richard Taylor

The bomber crews of the US Eighth Air Force rightfully earned their place in aviation history through heroism and devotion to duty, becoming one of the most highly decorated organisations of WWII with 17 Medal of Honor recipients and 66 Distinguished Unit Citation awards. But, with almost 6,000 heavy bombers lost, the cost of victory had come at an enormous price – only one in three airmen had survived the air battle over Europe.

In this evocative piece, Richard Taylor recreates a brief moment of reprieve as deep overnight snow temporarily grounds the Mighty Eighth during the bitter winter of 1944. With the morning sunlight glinting across the snow-covered landscape, a B-17G Flying Fortress of the 398th Bomb Group stands quietly near the perimeter of RAF Nuthampstead, awaiting the thaw that will allow the flying to begin again.

OKINAWA by Robert Taylor

Flying from USS Bunker Hill, F4U Corsairs from VMF-221 assault Japanese positions defending the island of Okinawa, April 1945. Leading the charge, USMC Pilot Lt Dean Caswell climbs away from the target after delivering a blistering rocket attack on a coastal installation.

Following their victory at Midway, American forces had fought a long and bitter campaign to retake the Japanese held islands in the Pacific. By the end of March 1945, however, they had finally captured Iwo Jima and looked towards Okinawa, a province of Japan itself. Less than 400 miles south of its mainland, it was the place from which the Allied invasion of Japan must be launched. Supported by a huge Naval presence, including one of the largest British fleets ever assembled, the assault began on 1 April 1945 with the largest amphibious landing of the Pacific war.

The Japanese response was ferocious seeing the peak of the kamikaze scourge and while the British ships with their steel decks fared much better, the relentless attacks took their toll on the US Fleet, highlighting a conflict worse than anything seen before. The 82 day battle was one of the most severe and bloody campaigns of WWII, accounting for over 14000 Allied deaths and five times that number of Japanese soldiers.

THE SPOILS OF WAR by Simon Smith

By the time they were called upon to jump into Holland during Operation Market Garden, the men of the US 101st Airborne Division had become one of the toughest and most formidable units of the entire US Army.

In Simon's commanding piece the men of Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR take a brief moment to reflect on their recent action during which they overpowered two entire companies of battle-hardened German Waffen-SS troops entrenched, with artillery support, along a Dutch dike, 5th October 1944.

GRAND SLAM by Richard Taylor

Richard’s spectacular drawing, completed on buff paper with subtle colour highlights, depicts Ken Trent and his crew as they gather in readiness for 617 Squadron’s raid on the Valentin U-boat construction facility at Farge, north of Bremen, 27 March 1945. Their modified Lancaster carries a massive ‘Grand Slam’ bomb as the final preparations are made the aircraft.

DEVASTATING STRIKE by Robert Taylor

It was less glamorous than the Spitfires and Hurricanes of the Battle of Britain and wasn’t seen as the backbone of Bomber Command yet the de Havilland Mosquito can arguably claim to be the RAFs ‘greatest’ aircraft of WWII.

It was one the fastest operational aircraft in the world, one of the most envied – and one of the most feared. Built almost entirely of wood, the beautifully streamlined ‘Wooden Wonder’ was a triumph of ingenuity at a time when resources of light alloys were in short supply.

OUT FROM KIRKBY by Richard Taylor

A strong force of Lancasters from 630 and 57 Squadrons, based at RAF East Kirkby, head out to attack industrial targets in the Ruhr, Autumn 1944.

Few aviation artists come close to Richard’s extraordinary skill with pencil and paint which is why his drawings are so highly prized. This outstanding piece is completed in his trademark technique combining graphite with colour highlights on buff paper.

VICTORY FLYOVER – GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

On Sunday 2 September 1945 the formal surrender document to conclude WWII was signed aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. At 09.25 hrs with General Douglas MacArthur, Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz and Admirals Halsey and Sherman presiding, the Instrument of Surrender was completed.

Robert Taylor’s classic painting Victory Flyover brings that historic moment to life again. Scarcely had the ink on the surrender document dried when, right on cue, and as if staged by Hollywood, shafts of brilliant sunlight broke through the morning mist to floodlight the scene. Above the Allied fleet a deep and growing rumble filled the air and a second armada appeared: hundreds of American Corsairs, Hellcats, Avengers, Helldivers, Mustangs, Thunderbolts and Superfortresses swept across the waters of Tokyo Bay to herald in the peace. The Second World War was finally over.

LANCASTER UNDER ATTACK – GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

December 1944 and the Reich is steadily crumbling. In the skies over Germany the raids by Allied heavy bombers continue unabated; the Americans by day, the RAF by night. But even as the Germans retreat, the intensity of the fight never diminishes.

Lancaster Under Attack - one of Robert Taylor’s most famous and collectible paintings - depicts a scene typical of the perils endured by the bomber crews. An RAF Lancaster of 626 Squadron takes evasive action as a Messerschmitt Bf110 G-4 night-fighter makes a potentially deadly pass beneath the bomber, during a raid over Osterfeld in the heart of Germany.

In this powerful and classic image both crews are locked in a desperate close- quarter battle as they bid to outmanoeuvre each other. The Lancaster, hampered by damage to its port wing and aileron, dodges its way through the darkness, taking care not to collide with other bombers, while the Bf110 pilot dives away to avoid the stream of tracer from the Lancaster’s front turret. The contest could go either way.

DECISIVE BLOW by Anthony Saunders

For weeks since the early days of September, London had been the main target for the Luftwaffe and during that time Luftwaffe High Command had grown increasingly despondent as their losses steadily mounted. Far from being on the brink of collapse RAF Fighter Command, though vastly outnumbered, had shown an incredible resilience.The fighting had reached a dramatic climax on Sunday 15 September when, bloodied and bruised, the Luftwaffe had lost the upper hand on a day of intense combat that had culminated with a humiliating retreat. Almost every day that had passed since then had seen the Luftwaffe do everything in its power to pummel London and regain the initiative, but the daylight raids were becoming increasingly costly. On Friday 27 September, 80 days after the Battle of Britain had officially begun, the Luftwaffe came once more, this time concentrating on the fastest bombers they had – Ju88s and Bf110s. And they came in force, principally targeting London and Bristol.

Anthony Saunders’ superb painting depicts one of these raids, this time by bombers from KG77 as they head over the Medway Estuary, east of the City of London, in an attempt to attack the capital’s warehouses and docks. Among the many units defending the capital that day was 92 Squadron from Biggin Hill and Anthony portrays the Spitfire of Pilot Officer Geoffrey Wellum in his dramatic piece. With a deft flick of the rudder Wellum banks his fighter away to port seconds after sharing in the destruction of a Ju88. It was just one of more than 50 German aircraft destroyed by the RAF during the day.

VITAL ASSAULT by Simon Smith

Sited on a high rocky headland jutting out into the sea four miles to the west of Omaha beach, Pointe du Hoc would be a tough nut to crack. Despite intensive Allied bombing in the months leading up to D-Day the concrete casements remained stubbornly unscathed and, although reports from the French Resistance suggested the guns might have been moved, nobody knew for sure. It was equally possible the guns were in place and that was a risk that couldn’t be taken if the amphibious assault of Omaha beach was to stand any chance of success.

The Pointe du Hoc battery was protected to seaward by near-vertical cliffs and, on the land side, by a web of intricate defences. To take it would need a crack unit and the task was given to three companies of the US 2nd Ranger Battalion and on the morning of 6 June 1944 the Rangers would need to call on all of their elite training.

As they made their approach three of their landing craft and an amphibious DUKW had been incapacitated by the rough seas and the delay caused by battling the strong currents had lost them the element of surprise, giving the Germans plenty of time to prepare a hostile reception when the Rangers finally hit the pocket-sized beach. Taking casualties immediately on landing, they had little time to ascend the cliff.

Scaling the 90-foot cliffs under relentless enemy fire, the first Rangers hit the top intent on destroying the guns – guns that had remained ominously silent. The French Resistance had been right; the guns had been moved. The Americans quickly sent out patrols in search of their quarry and soon found the guns, hidden in an orchard and trained directly on Utah beach, ready to fire. They were swiftly destroyed with grenades but the men now had to hold their ground enduring ferocious fighting for almost two days before reinforcements could get through.

SAINTE MERE EGLISE by Simon Smith

The small town of Sainte-Mère-Église, at the foot of the Cotentin peninsula, is just five miles inland from Utah Beach, the most westerly of the five assault beaches for D-Day and critical to the Allies’ right flank. The town lay beside the main highway from Paris that ran north from Carentan to the port of Cherbourg, and which provided a vital link to any German forces engaged in the defence of the area. Vital to ensuring a successful landing on Utah, the task of securing the town and road together with the nearby railway line and bridges over the River Merderet, was given to one of the best units in the US Army – the battle-hardened paratroopers of the 82nd Airborne Division.

In the early hours of 6 June 1944, after a widely scattered drop, some in the Division’s 505th PIR found themselves landing right in the heart of the town, caught in the glowing light cast by a burning building. With the white silk of their parachutes clearly visible, many of the men hanging defencelessly beneath them were easy targets. The casualty rate was high but, after regrouping with other units, the men of the 82nd attacked in a ferocious assault and a fierce firefight with the German defenders soon erupted. By dawn it was over and with the capture of the town the Stars and Stripes now flew over Sainte-Mère-Église.

The scene is superbly illustrated in Simon Smith’s dramatic piece, Sainte-Mère-Église, and the prints in this moving limited edition have been individually signed by two 82nd Airborne veterans who took part in the capture of the town, guaranteeing a lasting link to this famous episode in history.

WINGS OF WAR by Anthony Saunders

Anthony Saunders has gained a reputation as one of today’s most gifted aviation and military artists. Original in concept and outstanding in the use of oil on canvas, his accomplishments not only portray a wonderful grasp of the speed and power required when depicting scenes of aerial combat but also the ability to create breathtaking sky and landscapes at the same time.

Each painting featured in this beautifully illustrated new book is the result of hours of meticulous research by the artist to ensure that it is historically as well as technically correct.

With the foreword written by the iconic veteran of the Dambusters Raid, George ‘Johnny’ Johnson (who has also signed the limited edition book and print portfolio), the artist describes each painting in fascinating detail and the result of his many talents are obvious for all to see.

ALSO AVAILABLE AS A LIMITED EDITION BOOK AND PRINT PORTFOLIO – CLICK HERE FOR MORE DETAILS

KING OF THE AIR by Anthony Saunders

The Avro Lancaster was undoubtedly the RAF’s greatest heavy bomber of World War II and, as the war progressed, formed the backbone of Bomber Command’s night offensive deep into the heart of the Hitler’s Reich. From its first operational sortie in early 1942 until the last of the 7,377 aircraft built was delivered in February 1946, the Lancaster’s outward appearance remained much the same – testament to its design, and to four brilliant Merlin engines.

Many of the most spectacular raids of the war, such as the breaching of the Möhne and Eder dams in May 1943, and the sinking of the German battleship Tirpitz in November 1944, were carried out by Lancasters. Ten Victoria Crosses were awarded to Lancaster crew and, by the end of the war in Europe, these mighty bombers had flown over 156,000 missions and dropped more than 608,000 tons of bombs, but at a huge cost: Aircrews faced some of the worst casualty rates of WWII and some 3,500 aircraft were lost on operations. Only a handful of Lancasters survived to complete more than 100 operations.

Lancaster JB663 King of the Air was one of those, symbolically chosen by Anthony Saunders as the subject for his stunning piece to accompany his new book. This resilient aircraft survived the war having flown 111 operations, and is seen here on the morning of 29 July 1944 as Flight Sergeant S H Jones of 106 Squadron brings her safely home to RAF Metheringham after a night-time mission to Stuttgart. With prints signed by two of the most highly-distinguished veterans ever to have served in Lancasters, including 'Johnny Johnson' who also wrote the foreword, this new release rightly earns its place amongst the memorable editions published by the Military Gallery.

Regular unsigned books are also available – PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR DETAILS

COAST IN SIGHT by Robert Taylor

To celebrate forty years as the world's foremost aviation and military art publisher, we are delighted to present the first in a series of Robert Taylor Masterworks specially released from the archives of the Military Gallery.

On 25 April, 1945, RAF Bomber Command despatched a force of over 300 Lancasters to attack The Eagle’s Nest, Hitler’s personal retreat high in the Bavarian Alps. It was a symbolic operation because the war was all but over, nevertheless it was highly appropriate that after six years of savage aerial combat it was the Lancaster bombers and aircrew of Bomber Command that were chosen for the task.

The first operational Lancasters arrived with 44 Squadron at Waddington on Christmas Eve 1941 and it was quick to establish itself as the backbone of Bomber Command. By the summer of 1944 this legendary bomber, powered by four mighty Merlin engines, equipped over 40 squadrons and was as tough as the crews that flew it – men from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, as well as other Commonwealth countries along with many nations under the threat of Nazi rule. Despite facing appalling conditions and some of the worst casualty rates of WWII, every man was a volunteer, each part of a special breed of heroic young men whose dogged resilience in the face of danger is expertly captured by Robert Taylor in his previously unseen painting, Coast in Sight.

With one engine out and serious damage to the starboard wing, a Mk.III Lancaster struggles to maintain height as the crew coax their battered aircraft slowly home after a gruelling night bombing mission to Germany in the autumn of 1944. With the English coast now in sight, safety is within their grasp and the crew’s perilous journey will soon be over. Completed in 1986 this moving piece joins the library of other major editions undertaken during this period, classic works such as Bombers Moon, JG-52 and Last Flight Home.

DEADLY PASS by Anthony Saunders

Whilst the Allies pushed ever closer towards Berlin, in the south, amidst the snow-capped mountains of the Italian Alps, an equally bitter and increasingly brutal battle was raging as the Axis forces struggled to keep open their last major supply route – the Brenner Pass.

On the ground hundreds of heavy flak batteries now formed a formidable opposition to the American bombers targeting the transport links along the pass. In the air, however, the Luftwaffe had retreated. Fighter operations now rested with the remnants of the ANR, or Aeronáutica Nationale Republicana, that part of the Italian air force that had remained loyal to Mussolini and the Germans.

Although supplied with the latest Bf109s from their German partners, this ramshackle group of Italian pilots were in short supply of everything – except courage. Even as the last months of the war drew near they battled on, heavily outnumbered but an ever-present threat to the men of the US 12th Air Force.

Anthony Saunders’ dramatic painting captures one encounter that occurred on 14 March 1945 when B-25 Mitchells from the 321st Bomb Group ran into a group of ANR Bf109s from 1 Gruppo Caccia whose top Ace, Major Adriano Visconti, led the charge. His attack, however, was short-lived as he took hits from the P-47D of 2nd Lt Charles Eddy flying escort with the 350th Fighter Group. Visconti was forced to bale out over the snow-clad mountains below.

TOWARDS THE HOME FIRES by Robert Taylor

As the New Year of 1945 dawned, the snow had already spread to blanket the southern half of England. The festivities of Christmas had passed and the relentless pounding of German cities and industrial targets continued unabated. On every front Hitler’s once-fabled armies were in full retreat. The endgame was now in play.

Recalling that final harsh winter of the war Robert has painted one of the finest scenes of his illustrious career in a stunning tribute to Robin Olds, one of the legendary Aces who took part in the great aerial assault launched on Germany by the US Eighth Air Force.

With dusk approaching, Robin Olds, flying his P-51K Scat VI, leads a flight of Mustangs of the 434th Fighter Squadron, 479th Fighter Group low over the historic estuary town of Maldon in Essex as they head home to their base at Wattisham, 14 February 1945. The mission saw Olds add three more German fighters to his tally south of Berlin, making him one of the foremost Aces of the unit.

EAGLES OF THE NORTH by Richard Taylor

Following the invasion of Norway, Bf109s of 4./JG77 receive routine engine maintenance at a forward airfield during the summer of 1940. Overhead a flight returns from a fighter patrol over the recently occupied territory.

DAMBUSTERS – LEADING THE WAY by Robert Taylor

On the night of 16 / 17 May 1943, nineteen specially modified Lancasters of 617 Sqn left RAF Scampton to attack the mighty dams of the Ruhr valley using an ingenious 'bouncing bomb'. What followed would become legendary as one of the most audacious bombing raids ever attempted, and within hours the destruction of the Möhne and Eder dams would wreak havoc with the German war machine.

This cameo drawing from Robert’s Graphite Collection portrays the Lancaster of Wing Commander Guy Gibson leading the first wave with precision low flying over Holland en-route to the Möhne dam.

Each print is accompanied by a matching numbered copy of the fascinating book, We Will Remember Them, written with Guy Gibson's widow, Eve Gibson, and the portfolio includes the original signatures of Dambuster veterans.

KNIGHTS OF THE EASTERN FRONT – THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

In 1992 the Military Gallery published what was to become one of Robert Taylor’s most iconic paintings - Knights of the Eastern Front. It was a landmark in his distinguished career and became a benchmark for the aviation art industry. The painting, with its trademark ‘Taylor skyscape’, featured the Bf109s from JG-52 – the most successful fighter wing of the Luftwaffe during World War II – in combat with Russian Yak9s.

After fighting in the Battle of Britain, Romania and Crete, JG-52 transferred to the infamous southern sector of the Eastern Front. Though conditions were often appalling, its pilots notched up an incredible 10,000 victories with sixty- seven of them awarded the Knight’s Cross or higher decorations. JG-52’s top ten fighter pilots achieved an astonishing 2286 aerial victories between them and boasted the three highest-scoring Aces in history of which two, Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn, were the only Pilots ever to down more than 300 enemy aircraft.

PHANTOM SHOWTIME – THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

On 19 January 1972 Lt. Randy Cunningham and his Radar Intercept Officer, Lt. Willie ‘Irish’ Driscoll flying a Phantom F-4J from VF-96 off the carrier USS Constellation destroyed a MiG-21 over North Vietnam. It was the first of five air victories that paved the way for them to become the US Navy’s only Aces of the Vietnam War.

The action happened as Cunningham led a three-ship section tasked to escort a reconnaissance mission undertaken by an RA-5C Vigilante over an enemy airfield. As the Vigilante came under heavy fire, Cunningham and Driscoll spotted two MiG- 21s below them, just above the jungle tops. As the first MiG broke hard to avoid Cunningham’s heat-seeking Sidewinder, the Navy pilot then turned his full attention on the second MiG and fired again. This time it was a direct hit.

Robert Taylor’s incredibly powerful painting depicts Cunningham’s returning F-4 Phantom – call sign ‘Showtime 112’ – screaming past the carrier at 500 knots just feet above the murky waters of the Gulf of Tonkin and has become one of the most popular portraits of the Phantom in Taylor's extensive portfolio.

OPS ON HOLD by Richard Taylor

March 1944 and heavy snow has settled firmly over the frozen Lincolnshire countryside around RAF Fiskerton. For once the Lancasters of 49 Squadron stand quietly idle at their dispersal points around the airfield’s perimeter. It’s a scene recreated at many other heavy bomber airfields across the east of England and the young airmen who crew these mighty machines now wait patiently for the inevitable thaw that will soon see them in combat again.

For some, however, the future is uncertain. Just a few weeks later, on 30 March 1944, during a raid on Nuremberg, more than 100 bombers would be shot down. In the space of a single night Bomber Command would suffer more men lost than had Fighter Command during the entire Battle of Britain.

Bomber Command flew more than 389,000 sorties from 101 operational bases across the east of England during WWII and the aircrew that undertook these missions came from Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Rhodesia and many countries under Nazi occupation. Every airman was a volunteer and with an average age of just 22 they were forced to grow up quickly, enduring frightening odds and suffering terrible losses - only the Nazi U-Boat force experienced a higher casualty rate.

Of the 125,000 men who served, 55,573 were killed. For every 100 airmen who joined Bomber Command, 45 would lose their lives, 6 would be seriously wounded and 8 made prisoners of war. Yet they resolutely overcame the overwhelming forces stacked against them, including some of the worst flying conditions imaginable and, never flinching from their task, flew until victory was finally achieved.

QUIET REFLECTION by Richard Taylor

June 1940: and the freedom of Britain lay in the hands of a small band of young RAF fighter pilots. Facing them across the Channel, the all-conquering Luftwaffe stood in eager anticipation of an easy victory, one that would allow were Hitler’s mighty armies to invade. So heavily were the odds stacked against the RAF, few gave Fighter Command a chance. The American ambassador to Britain reported that ‘democracy is finished in England’. He was wrong.

Although outnumbered more than five to one at the outset, as the savage aerial battles raged continuously over southern England, the courage and dedication of Fighter Command’s young airmen gradually turned the tide. By the end of September the battle was won and, for the first time, the Luftwaffe had tasted defeat.

Richard Taylor’s outstanding composition portrays a more reflective image of those heroic RAF fighter pilots in contrast perhaps to the deadly trials they faced on a daily basis. Just occasionally during that long hot summer of 1940 were rare moments of peaceful respite. Every minute off-duty was time to be savoured, especially for this particular young fighter pilot and his girl as they briefly pause along a quiet country lane to watch the Spitfires from 92 Squadron pass low overhead. For a few moments the distinctive roar of Merlin engines shatters the peace and they both know that this time tomorrow it will be him who will be flying into combat.

WOLFPACK by Richard Taylor

P-47 Thunderbolts of the 56th Fighter Group – The Wolfpack – release their drop tanks as they prepare to engage enemy fighters low over the Rhine, November 1944. The Wolfpack had more Aces and destroyed more enemy aircraft in air combat than any other fighter group in the Eighth Air Force.

Commanded by the legendary Hubert ‘Hub’ Zemke, the 56th Fighter Group became the first fighter group to fly the P-47 Thunderbolt in combat. The unit roared over Western Europe before and during D-Day and the subsequent Allied advance. It soon became known as ‘Zemke’s Wolfpack’ as their formidable reputation grew. And with good reason, the 56th finished the war with more air-to-air victories than any other fighter group in the Eighth Air Force, was the top scoring P-47 group of the war, and recorded the second-highest number of air-to-air victories of any fighter group in the entire USAAF.

DOUBLE STRIKE by Robert Taylor

RECOUNTING AN ACTION DURING THE LARGEST JET-TO-JET BATTLE IN HISTORY - THE YOM KIPPUR WAR

Yom Kippur – the Day of Atonement – is the holiest day in the Hebrew calendar and in Israel is marked by a national holiday but on that day in 1973 the unexpected happened. At 14.00 hours on 6 October the coalition of Arab states led by Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israeli positions. Thousands of Egyptian troops swarmed across the Suez Canal into Israeli- held Sinai whilst in the north nearly 1,500 Syrian tanks backed by artillery thrust west towards Israel. Facing this sudden surprise attack on the Golan Heights were less than 200 Israeli tanks. In the air, too, Egyptian and Syrian air forces struck in a single, co-ordinated assault hitting the Israeli’s anti-aircraft defences and hoping to deliver a fatal blow.

Largely unprepared, Israel reeled however within hours it mobilised its fighting reserves and began a ferocious battle to stem the enemies advance. As Israeli tanks and infantry rushed to hold the front line and, in the north, push the enemy back, Israeli Air Force jets overhead fought a heroic battle to regain the initiative and control of the skies. It was grim work. Both Egyptian and Syrian forces were equipped with hundreds of Soviet-supplied SAM missiles but the tide of war was turning and a battered Israeli Air Force now went on the counter-offensive. And amongst their main targets were the heavily-defended Egyptian air bases that lay deep in the Nile delta.

Robert Taylor’s powerful and dramatic painting depicts one such strike that took place on 14 October 1973, half way through the war, when Israeli F-4 Phantom fighter-bombers made simultaneous strikes against the Egyptian air bases at Mansoura and Tanta north of Cairo.

After the first wave struck the elite Egyptian MiG-21 units at El Mansoura, the other Phantom squadrons attacked Tanta in waves, turning to dog-fighting immediately after dropping their ordnance. Tanta was also home to two squadrons of Libyan Mirage 5s and the furious air battle that ensued involved countless fighter aircraft. Despite bitter opposition, the successful IAF missions eliminated much of the effectiveness of the Egyptian Air Force and its Libyan allies.

DESERT VICTORY - A MASTERWORK DRAWING by Robert Taylor

IAF Squadron Commander Avaham Lanir, flying an Israeli Air Force Mirage III high over the Syrian desert, scores a victory over a Syrian MiG-21 on 9 November 1972. Later, during the Yom Kippur War, his Mirage was hit by a Syrian missile ambush, forcing him to eject over enemy territory. Despite valiant efforts to rescue him, he was captured by the Syrians and died under interrogation.

FIELDS OF GLORY by Richard Taylor

With the Battle of Britain reaching its climax, Mk.Ia Spitfires from 92 Squadron return to their new base at Biggin Hill in early September 1940. As if in tribute to fallen comrades, a bright swathe of second- flowering corn poppies greet their thunderous arrival.

THE GREATEST DAY
THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN, 15 SEPTEMBER 1940
by Robert Taylor

THE GREATEST DAY FOR THE RAF – HALF RAIDERS BROUGHT DOWN: 375 CAME, ONLY 175 RETURNED
Hitler's air force returned to mass daylight raids yesterday and the RAF gave them the most shattering defeat they have ever known.
The Daily Mail 16 Sept 1940

Sunday 15 September 1940 and Luftwaffe supremo Hermann Goering believed victory over the RAF was at hand. Today, he decreed, would be the day that his 'glorious' Luftwaffe would finally break the back of Fighter Command's stubborn resistance. Or so he believed.

In response to a massed formation of enemy aircraft detected heading for London, Air Vice Marshal Keith Park commanding 11 Group scrambled his squadrons. He also requested that 12 Group bring Douglas Bader's 'Big Wing' down from Duxford. Every available pilot and machine was committed. Prime Minister Winston Churchill turned to Park and asked "What other reserves have we" "There are none", Park replied.

Bader now had five squadrons racing south, meeting what remained of the enemy on the outskirts of London.

With a successful morning behind them the RAF fighters raced back to re-fuel and re-arm. Just after 14.00 hrs another enemy battle group was observed and this time the formations were even larger. Bader's Wing was scrambled once more.

RETURN FROM THE FRAY by Richard Taylor

They came from every corner of Britain. And mostly they were young. These fresh faced fighter pilots, joined by an ever-growing band of volunteer airmen from the British Commonwealth and those who had managed to escape from the occupied countries of Europe would, over the summer of 1940, not only hold the world’s most powerful air force at bay, they would defeat it.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Hugh Dowding, head of Fighter Command, called them his ‘fighter boys’ but it was Prime Minister Winston Churchill who gave them the name that’s forever etched into the history books – 'the Few'.
In a rousing speech before a packed House of Commons on 20 August 1940 he expressed the world’s gratitude to these brave, heroic airmen who ‘undaunted by odds....are turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and by their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few’.

Richard Taylor’s stunning piece graphically conveys the conflicting realities of those deadly aerial encounters over southern England during 1940. As the sound of Merlin engines briefly interrupts the tranquillity of a sleepy English village, its residents are determined to carry on with everyday life. In the skies overhead the bitter battle will shortly be reaching its crescendo but, for today at least, the fighting is over as Flight Sergeant George ‘Grumpy’ Unwin, one of the Battle of Britain’s top Aces, and the Spitfire pilots of 19 Squadron return from yet another encounter with Goering’s much-vaunted Luftwaffe.

RETURN TO EAST KIRKBY by Richard Taylor

The air resonates to the unmistakable sound of Merlin engines as Lancasters from 630 and 57 Squadrons skim low over the Lincolnshire countryside whilst returning to their base at East Kirkby, in the summer of 1944.

RAF East Kirkby was home to Lancasters of 630 and 57 Squadrons who often flew together on long-range bombing raids including attacks against Berlin and Hitler’s alpine home at Berchtesgaden. It is of great historical importance that every print has been personally signed by one of the last surviving veterans based at RAF East Kirkby during WWII.

EYE OF THE SUN by Robert Taylor

You can feel the tension in this evocative painting as Messerschmitt Bf109s from 7./JG2 Richthofen head out on a long-range fighter patrol in September 1940. With the sun behind them they hope to launch a surprise attack on unsuspecting RAF aircraft, however these enemy raiders will soon be intercepted by some of Fighter Command’s most determined ‘defenders of the realm’.

RESPONSE TO CALL by Robert Taylor

You can almost hear the roar of their mighty Merlin engines and feel the prop-wash in Robert Taylor’s commemorative new salute to the Hawker Hurricane. His classic portrayal of this much-loved fighter depicts a pair of Mk.I Hurricanes from 32 Squadron leading the scramble away from their forward airfield. Often making three, four or five such scrambles a day at the height of the battle, this time they are racing to intercept Luftwaffe intruders who have been spotted crossing the Kent coast.

THUNDER IN THE ARDENNES by Anthony Saunders

In the early hours of 16 December 1944, out of nowhere, hundreds of panzers and thousands of troops poured forward as Hitler launched the last great German offensive of the war and, for once, the Allies had been wrong-footed. The thinly-held Ardennes was the last place they’d been expecting a counter-attack, but now three German armies were heading west across an 80-mile front.

Caught off guard the Americans rushed in reinforcements, including the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions encamped near Reims, over a hundred miles away. Exhausted by the fighting in Holland during Operation Market Garden, they had been sent to Reims to recuperate. They never got the chance. Thrown into the thick of the action the 82nd helped to blunt the Germans’ advance to the north, whilst at Bastogne, a pivotal town further south, the 101st, surrounded, out-numbered and besieged, refused to surrender. The line held and three days before Christmas the panzers ground to a halt, stalled by lack of fuel.

As the weather improved the Allies could now bring their airpower into play. Hitler’s last gamble had failed.

LONGEST SUMMER
The book and print portfolio
by Anthony Saunders

Harvesting is briefly interrupted as Mk.I Spitfires of 609 Squadron pass low overhead. The young pilots return to 10 Group Sector Station at Middle Wallop after successfully engaging Luftwaffe raiders attacking naval facilities on the south coast, August 1940.

This prestigious limited edition portfolio, specially issued to commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain, includes an individually numbered limited first edition copy of the book THEIR FINEST HOUR.

Presented in its own luxury embossed slipcase, each book is accompanied by a matching-numbered copy of the limited edition print Longest Summer.

THEIR FINEST HOUR - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 1940 by The Military Gallery

The story of the Battle of Britain is brought to life through the paintings and drawings of some of the world’s foremost aviation and military artists. Published to commemorate the 75th Anniversary, this beautifully illustrated 128 page full-colour book, portrays these historic events with a visual clarity rarely seen before.

Taking place from July to October 1940 the Battle of Britain, a battle of such crucial historic importance that it ranks alongside Agincourt, Waterloo and victory over the Spanish Armada, has inspired many books containing the results of much painstaking research.

Yet, there are few visual records of the dramatic encounters that took place during the summer of 1940 as Nazi Germany prepared to invade Britain. Their Finest Hour relives those historic events through the eyes of some of the world’s leading aviation and military artists as the young men of the RAF, though impossibly outnumbered, repelled the might of Hitler’s war machine.

HURRICANE ATTACK - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Few flew the Hurricane better in combat than Squadron Leader John Grandy, Commanding Officer of 249 Squadron. Robert’s iconic painting Hurricane Attack portrays him about to pounce on a Bf110 over the Isle of Wight in August 1940.

Originally published as a companion with Height of the Battle RAF limited edition print, this superb piece is now released as an individual Giclée Studio Proof.

MAPLE LEAF SCRAMBLE - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

The latest Giclée technology has once again brought Robert Taylor’s sophisticated artistry to life to faithfully replicate his classic painting of the Hurricanes of 1 Squadron (RCAF). Becoming operational at Northolt in August 1940 they served with great distinction throughout the Battle of Britain.

Originally published as a companion with Height of the Battle RCAF limited edition print, this superb piece is now released as an individual Giclée Studio Proof.

HEIGHT OF THE BATTLE - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Continuing his popular series of Giclée Studio Proofs on canvas, Robert Taylor portrays Squadron Leader ‘Sailor’ Malan DFC, Commanding Officer of 74 Squadron and one of the great Battle of Britain Aces, in his famous painting Height of the Battle. Having already made one diving attack into the force of Luftwaffe He111 bombers approaching London with their fighter escort, ‘Sailor’ peels his Spitfire over for a second attack. Another top Ace, Pilot Officer Harbourne Stephen DFC, is hard on his heels. Below them, typifying the scene as it was on the afternoon of Wednesday 11 September 1940, Mk.I Hurricanes from 17 and 56 Squadrons have already joined the fray.

This superb piece was originally released as a veteran signed limited edition print some years ago and is long sold out, so the Military Gallery is delighted that this wonderful Masterwork painting is now faithfully replicated on canvas using the latest high-definition Giclée technology.

THE DAMBUSTERS - THREE GOOD BOUNCES by Robert Taylor

In the history of air warfare few missions come close in terms of courage and the highest skills of precision flying to the one carried out by 617 Squadron on the night of 16/17 May 1943. Codenamed Operation Chastise, their mission was to destroy the great dams that were vital to the industries of the Ruhr and, to do so, they would use a radical new weapon designed by Barnes Wallis – a ‘bouncing bomb’ that would ‘skip’ across the water before detonating against the dam wall.

On the night of 16 May, after seven weeks of intensive low level training, nineteen crews flew their Lancaster Bombers from RAF Scampton to carry out what became one of the most legendary missions of all time. The result was the destruction of the Möhne and Eder dams.

Robert Taylor’s outstanding painting depicts a moment at the height of the successful attack on the Möhne Dam, the first of three primary targets that night, as ‘Dinghy’ Young powers Lancaster AJ-A over the wall of the dam just after releasing his bouncing bomb.

Commanding Officer Guy Gibson, flying high with lights on to draw enemy flak, noted that Young’s bomb made “three good bounces” before successfully detonating against the dam wall to trigger its collapse. David Maltby in AJ-J will shortly deliver the final, decisive blow.

FINAL ROSTER by Anthony Saunders

On the evening of 5 June 1944, at a dozen airfields across southern England, more than 13,000 American paratroopers prepared themselves for a mission that would change the course of history.

The next morning these brave young men found themselves at the forefront of the bitter fighting to secure the right flank of the Normandy beach-head. The odds against them were huge and, if they failed, the American amphibious landings on Utah and Omaha beaches would face disaster – the destiny of the US First Army rested squarely on the shoulders of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions.

WE ALL STAND TOGETHER THE MATTED TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history. Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny. Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price. But they won.

As part of the Military Gallery’s commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain, Robert Taylor has created a stunning new drawing. Brimming with realism, the world’s premier aviation artist captures the very essence of an airfield during the height of the battle.


WE ALL STAND TOGETHER THE MATTED REMARQUE EDITION by Robert Taylor

All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history. Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny. Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price. But they won.

As part of the Military Gallery’s commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain, Robert Taylor has created a stunning new drawing. Brimming with realism, the world’s premier aviation artist captures the very essence of an airfield during the height of the battle.


WE ALL STAND TOGETHER by Robert Taylor

Spitfires of 616 Squadron scramble from RAF Kenley during the heavy fighting of the Battle of Britain, late August 1940. Below them a Hurricane of 253 Squadron, sharing the same base, is being prepared for its next vital mission at a distant dispersal.

All through the long summer of 1940, as Britain stood alone, a small band of fighter pilots took part in the greatest aerial battle in history. Day after day the men of Fighter Command valiantly took to the air to defend their country from the Luftwaffe and the threat of German invasion and Nazi tyranny. Outnumbered, but never out-fought, they fought to the point of exhaustion and, in doing so, paid a heavy price. But they won.

As part of the Military Gallery’s commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain, this unprecedented edition is issued as a lasting tribute to the heroic young men of RAF Fighter Command who fought during the summer of 1940.

EVE OF DESTINY - THE MASTERWORK DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Paratroopers of the US 101st Airborne Division prepare to board Douglas C-47s at Upottery Airfield on the eve of D-Day. Shortly after 22.00hrs they will set course for Normandy and, after crossing the French coast under heavy AA fire, drop behind Utah Beach to seize key objectives just hours before the largest seaborne invasion in history.

EVE OF DESTINY by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s stunning painting, Eve of Destiny, has been specially commissioned to honor the veterans who fought with one of the most famous Airborne Divisions in history – the US 101st. Movingly, it depicts the fighting men of one their most illustrious units - Easy Company from the 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment - the famous Band of Brothers, as they take inventory of their equipment during the early evening of 5 June 1944. Alongside them on the hard-standing of Upottery Airfield in Devon the C-47s of the 438th Troop Carrier Group with their hastily-applied invasion stripes, stand primed, ready to carry the elite unit to Normandy in the early hours of D-Day.

WINTER COMBAT by Richard Taylor

Designed by Sydney Camm in the early 1930s, the Hurricane was the RAF’s first fighter capable of flying at over 300mph. Compared to Mitchell’s radical new Spitfire the Hurricane was built using the traditional methods that underpinned the high regard pilots had for Hawker aircraft. It would soon prove to be one of the most rugged fighters in the history of combat aviation.

Following the outbreak of war Hurricanes fought with distinction in the Battle of France. During the Battle of Britain it was responsible for shooting down more enemy aircraft than its famous counterpart, the Spitfire and from the beginning of July until the end of October 1940, four-fifths of all enemy aircraft destroyed fell victim to the guns of a Hurricane. This hugely versatile aircraft fought throughout the whole of WWII including northern Europe and the Mediterranean to North Africa and the Far East.


WINTER COMBAT - THE MASTERWORK DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Designed by Sydney Camm in the early 1930s, the Hurricane was the RAF’s first fighter capable of flying at over 300mph. Compared to Mitchell’s radical new Spitfire the Hurricane was built using the traditional methods that underpinned the high regard pilots had for Hawker aircraft. It would soon prove to be one of the most rugged fighters in the history of combat aviation.

Following the outbreak of war Hurricanes fought with distinction in the Battle of France. During the Battle of Britain it was responsible for shooting down more enemy aircraft than its famous counterpart, the Spitfire and from the beginning of July until the end of October 1940, four-fifths of all enemy aircraft destroyed fell victim to the guns of a Hurricane. This hugely versatile aircraft fought throughout the whole of WWII including northern Europe and the Mediterranean to North Africa and the Far East.


THE BIG PUSH by Anthony Saunders

On 28 July 1914 the unthinkable happened and Europe found itself heading towards the most brutal war it had known. By the time it ended, four years later, an estimated 10 million had been killed with twice that number wounded and Four Empires – the German, Russian, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman – had ceased to exist. Europe would never be the same again.

To commemorate one of the most historic anniversaries in history, Anthony Saunders has created a powerful new painting portraying the bleak sacrifice made by so many heroic young men. The names of the bitter battles they endured, however, still live on a hundred years later – Ypres, the Somme, Vimy Ridge, Arras, Loos – and one of the most savage – Passchendaele.

KNIGHT OF THE REICH by Robert Taylor

On the morning of 15 October 1943, as Bf109G's from III./JG52 dive into attack a group of Russian fighters high over Zaporozhye in south-east Ukraine, their Kommandeur Hauptmann Günther Rall pounces on a Soviet La-5 to claim his 222nd victory.

During this astonishing one month period he shot down 40 aircraft and at the end of November 1943 acheived 250 victories - at the time only the second Ace to do so after Walter Nowotny. By the time he was posted back to the West, Rall was well on the way to his final score of 275 victories, making him the third highest- scoring Ace in history. Had he not been wounded in action numerous times and forced to spend months in hospital, he might well have been the highest-scoring Ace of them all.

FINE TUNING by Richard Taylor

Messerschmitt Bf 109’s of II./JG53 undergo routine maintenance at Charleville-Mézières, Northern France, during the summer of 1940. With the Battle of Britain at its height the German fighters will soon be back in action over the Channel and southern England.

This outstanding limited edition portfolio includes an individually numbered and signed copy of the book THE ART OF COMBAT and issued in a luxurious embossed slipcase. Each book is accompanied by a matching numbered copy of the superb print FINE TUNING, specially created by Richard for this occasion:

THE ART OF COMBAT by Richard Taylor

It’s hardly surprising that Richard Taylor became a professional artist. His father is Robert Taylor, regarded as the finest aviation and maritime painter of his generation. For the past few years, however, Richard has been quietly carving out his own niche in the world of aviation and military art and is seen as one of the industry’s most exciting artists.

This beautifully illustrated book contains more than 30 of Richard’s air combat and military paintings, which have been successfully published as limited edition prints by the Military Gallery, together with a veritable feast of new drawings, many of which are seen here for the first time. Most of the paintings have a dedicated chapter to themselves in which the artist describes the history behind the images, and how each painting came into existence. .

The impressive array of work contained within these pages will delight the thousands of collectors around the world who share a passion for classic warbirds of former times, and a love of fine aviation and military art as exemplified by the talent of Richard Taylor.

THE ART OF COMBAT by Richard Taylor

It’s hardly surprising that Richard Taylor became a professional artist. His father is Robert Taylor, regarded as the finest aviation and maritime painter of his generation. For the past few years, however, Richard has been quietly carving out his own niche in the world of aviation and military art and is seen as one of the industry’s most exciting artists.

This beautifully illustrated book contains more than 30 of Richard’s air combat and military paintings, which have been successfully published as limited edition prints by the Military Gallery, together with a veritable feast of new drawings, many of which are seen here for the first time. Most of the paintings have a dedicated chapter to themselves in which the artist describes the history behind the images, and how each painting came into existence.

The impressive array of work contained within these pages will delight the thousands of collectors around the world who share a passion for classic warbirds of former times, and a love of fine aviation and military art as exemplified by the talent of Richard Taylor.


THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 2015 CALENDAR by The Military Gallery

A COLLECTION OF ICONIC PAINTINGS BY SOME OF THE WORLDS FOREMOST AVIATION ARTISTS TO COMMEMORATE THE 75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN.

FEATURING WORK BY ROBERT TAYLOR, GERALD COULSON, RICHARD TAYLOR & ANTHONY SAUNDERS.

ACT OF VALOR by Simon Smith

Snow was falling and it was bitterly cold as First Lieutenant James ‘Maggie’ Megellas brought his weary platoon to an abrupt halt. Quietly he ordered his men down – something was wrong.

It was Sunday 28th January 1945 and, in the aftermath of the Battle of the Bulge, he and his small unit had been advancing all day along heavily wooded, snow-clad tracks towards their objective - the small town of Herresbach. Almost immediately he spotted movement. Advancing out of the town through the tree line ahead, and oblivious to the American’s presence, was a large force of German infantry.

Megellas realized they were heavily out- numbered and that surprise was their best weapon. Seizing the moment, the American paratroopers charged the unsuspecting enemy, firing from the hip. Caught off- guard the dazed Germans were routed and within minutes over a hundred enemy lay dead, the survivors threw down their weapons and surrendered. Incredibly not a single American had been killed or injured.

But the day’s action wasn’t over: the unmistakable sound of heavy armor now carried across the snow-covered battleground as a German MkV Panther tank lumbered ominously towards them. With total disregard for his own safety, Megellas single-handedly charged the steel monster, placing a grenade into one of its tracks he disabled the tank, before throwing another grenade inside, eliminating the crew.

For this selfless and heroic act Megellas was immediately nominated for the Medal of Honor. The regimental account of his action, however, was somehow omitted from the official battle report and instead he was awarded the Silver Star.

Simon Smith’s dramatic new image Act of Valor, picks up the story as, with the Panther rendered harmless, Megellas readies his men for their final advance into Herresbach.

COMING HOME TO KIRKBY by Richard Taylor

The Avro Lancaster formed the backbone of RAF Bomber Command and was considered by many as the best bomber aircraft of WWII. 630 Squadron formed at East Kirkby in November 1943 as part of Bomber Command’s strategic bombing campaign. Equipped with Lancasters, they often flew together with 57 Squadron from their shared Lincolnshire base to take part in many major bombing raids including those on Berlin and Hitler’s alpine home at Berchtesgaden.

WE TREATED THEM ALL THE SAME by Simon Smith

In the early hours of 6 June 1944 two medics from the 101st Airborne – Kenneth Moore and Robert Wright – arrived to find themselves in the middle of a confused and savage firefight. Undeterred by the fighting around them the two men immediately set up a field dressing-station in the little village church to treat the growing numbers of wounded.

In an act of true humanity within the brutality of war, the two medics insisted on treating every wounded soldier brought here equally, regardless of the uniform they wore.

There was, however, one simple rule. No guns were to be brought inside the church. When two German paratroopers burst through the doors, machine-guns raised, the medics simply stared them straight in the eye and nodded down to the young German soldier they were treating. The two enemy paratroopers immediately understood. Both saluted and withdrew.

By the time the fighting was over, all but three of the 80 wounded had survived.

UNSCHEDULED ARRIVAL by Richard Taylor

September 1940, and Mk1 Spitfires from 19 Sqn have been ordered south to engage heavily escorted Luftwaffe bomber formations heading for the Thames Estuary and London. Following intense fighting the Spitfires’ ammunition is expended, and low on fuel the squadron makes a hurried landing at a forward airfield to replenish empty tanks and re-arm. Within minutes they will be airborne again.

Together with the uninviting waters of the Channel, the RAF were the only thing stopping an invasion by Hitler’s all-conquering Panzers. Completely outnumbered Fighter Command had been forced to go head to head with the most powerful air force in the world and, by the end of October, through raw courage and determination were victorious.

HELL HAWKS OVER UTAH by Robert Taylor

As elements of the US VII Corps storm ashore on Utah beach below, P-47D Thunderbolts from the 365th Fighter Group, US Ninth Air Force - The Hell Hawks - overfly the Normandy bridgehead on the morning of D-Day, 6 June 1944. Flying from their base in southern England, the mighty Hell Hawks head inland to attack and successfully suppress German positions in support of the American advance.

Robert Taylor’s outstanding Masterwork, specially commissioned to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of D-Day and the battle for Normandy, pays tribute to the roughnecks of the 365th Fighter Group as they cross Utah Beach on the morning of 6 June 1944. They will shortly be in action taking out German armored units resisting the advance of the US First Army from the invasion beaches.

DOOLITTLE'S D-DAY - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

“Robert Taylor, the world’s premier aviation artist recounts a remarkable true event over the D-Day beaches ”
By any military standards, it was difficult to imagine the Supreme Commander of the largest air force of the time, piloting himself over the battlefront during the opening hours of one of history’s greatest military operations. But Jimmy Doolittle was no ordinary commander.

Hero of the famous 1942 raid on Tokyo, Jimmy Doolittle always led from the front. By 6 June 1944 he was in command of the US 8th Air Force and wanted to see for himself how the battle was going. And that’s exactly what he did. Piloting a P-38 across the beaches for two hours he returned to base, racing over to General Eisenhower’s headquarters to provide the first report the Supreme Allied Commander received, beating his own intelligence channels by several hours.

D-DAY THE AIRBORNE ASSAULT - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

“With his unrivalled flair and talent Robert Taylor's superb image is one of the most iconic portrayals of the D-Day airborne assault of all time….”

It began shortly after midnight on 6 June 1944 when two American and one British Airborne Division started to drop en-masse into Normandy. Their mission: to secure the flanks for the mighty amphibious armada heading towards the invasion beaches. As dawn broke to reveal the bullet-swept beaches below, overhead the skies were still filled with troop-carrying aircraft towing gliders heading for the drop zones.

Robert Taylor’s iconic masterpiece D-Day - The Airborne Assault has been hailed by many leading veterans as the most realistic portrayal of D-Day air events rendered by any artist. Seen crossing a section of the invasion beaches, and closely escorted by P- 51Bs of the 354th Fighter Group, C-47s of the 438th TCG tow CG-4 Waco gliders bringing in yet more reinforcements for the 82nd Airborne Division.

OVERLORD - D-DAY AND THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY by

HISTORIC COMMEMORATIVE BOOK

6 June 1944: the date that marked the beginning of the end of the war in north-west Europe, and the day on which the liberation of France began.

Re-live the story of D-Day with this 128 page book lavishly illustrated with paintings and drawings assembled from the archives of the Military Gallery. We travel through the pre-invasion preparation, the landings themselves, and subsequent battle for control of Normandy as seen through the eyes of the world's leading military and aviation artists, creating a visual masterpiece to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of D-Day.

ASSAULT ON OMAHA BEACH - the book and print portfolio by Simon Smith

Charging into a blizzard of unyielding machine-gun and mortar fire, elements of the 29th Infantry Division lead the assault on Omaha Beach, 6 June 1944. The scene at the water’s edge is one of chaos and bloody carnage as the heavily laden troops begin the 200 yard rush across the bullet-swept sands of what would later be known as ‘Bloody’ Omaha.

The 29th Infantry Division suffered massive casualties during their assault on Omaha Beach, so to release an edition that is personally signed by two veterans that fought in the first wave, is simply remarkable and we feel privileged to offer this historic piece to collectors.

PREPARING T-TOMMY AND THE LAST BRITISH DAMBUSTER - THE PRINT AND BOOK PORTFOLIO by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s stunning pencil drawing, completed on antique buff paper with colour highlights, depicts 617 ground crew as they prepare Lancaster AJ-T for Operation Chastise on the afternoon of Sunday 16 May 1943. Originally the reserve aircraft, AJ-T was flown to the Sorpe Dam by Flight Lieutenant Joe McCarthy and his crew after their aircraft AJ-Q developed a coolant leak moments before take-off. Bomb Aimer George ‘Johnny’ Johnson successfully released their bomb, spot on target, at 00.46 hrs in the morning, 17 May 1943.

THE LAST BRITISH DAMBUSTER By George ‘Johnny’Johnson

For the first time, ‘Johnny’ Johnson – Britain’s last surviving Dambuster and one of the very few men who can recall first-hand the most daring and ingenious air raid of all time – relives the fateful night of 16 / 17 May 1943. He recalls with unique wit and insight the difficult training conducted in secrecy, the race against time to release the bombs, and the sheer strength and bravery shown by a small unit faced with great adversity and uncertainity. Embodying a whole squadron, and leaving a lasting legacy for generations to come, 'Johnny’s' story is like no other.

MIDWINTER DAWN by Robert Taylor

A TRIBUTE TO J.E. ‘JOHNNIE’ JOHNSON, THE HIGHEST SCORING RAF ACE OF WORLD WAR II

The engineers at Rolls-Royce had worked their magic. They had somehow managed to squeeze every available ounce of power out of the current Merlin engine and by D-Day on 6 June 1944 the sleek Mk.IX Spitfires of Fighter Command reigned supreme in the skies over Normandy.

The magnificent Mk.IXs were, by far, the most numerous variant of Spitfires that fought from D-Day to the threshold of the Reich. In the great drive from Normandy across northern France, Belgium and into Holland the Spitfire pilots of Fighter Command threw down the gauntlet to any Luftwaffe pilots brave enough, or foolhardy enough, to tangle with them.

Perhaps the greatest pilot to ever fly the Spitfire was the RAF’s top fighter Ace ‘Johnnie’ Johnson. His resolute determination and steadfast leadership came into its own during D-Day and the subsequent advance through Normandy, and he would finish the war as the highest scoring Allied Ace in Europe.

The scene captures the moment when, as Wing Leader of 127 Canadian Wing, Johnnie is seen leading Mk.IX Spitfires from 421 ‘Red Indian’ Squadron RCAF out on patrol from their airfield at Evère near Brussels on a cold December morning in 1944. It is close to the fighting and the German front line so, as the Canadians climb steadily out over the snow clad landscape in the golden light of dawn, they are already alert and on the lookout for the first signs of trouble.

STRIKE ON BERLIN by Anthony Saunders

The swaggering figure of the Reichsmarschall swept imperiously into the Air Ministry on Berlin’s Wilhemstrasse, his jewel-encrusted baton and extravagant uniform as flamboyant as ever. This was Saturday, 30 January 1943, the tenth Anniversary of the Nazi Party coming to power, and Goering was about to deliver the main speech in tribute to the Party and its leader, the Fuhrer - Adolf Hitler.

The Royal Air Force had other plans for the anniversary. In stark defiance of the imagined air security safeguarding Berlin, brave pilots of 105 and 139 Sqn's took to the air in de Havilland Mosquito's, on course for Germany. Their mission: RAF Bomber Command’s first daylight raid on Berlin!

SAGAN - THE GREAT ESCAPE PRINT AND BOOK PORTFOLIO by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor's superb drawing, completed in his trademark graphite and paint combination, recreates the scene as escaped POW's, dressed in plain clothes, mix with local civilians in an attempt to catch the early morning train and make their bid for freedom.

CAUGHT ON THE SURFACE - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

The Battle of the Atlantic was fought by the Royal Navy and RAF Coastal Command against the U-boats. It was a long, deadly struggle in which Hitler’s prized U-boat fleet attempted to starve Britain of food, fuel and the materials of war by destroying the convoys that kept it supplied. The effective use of depth charges by Allied aircraft demanded an attack from extremely low level, but as each submarine was armed with 10 cannons, the dangers to the aircrews was immense.

TROPICAL DUTIES - A SALUTE TO THE SHORT SUNDERLAND by Richard Taylor

It was tough, reliable and could turn its hand to almost any maritime task

On Wednesday 22 June 1938 a new sound was heard over the humid streets of Singapore as four Bristol Pegasus radial engines heralded the arrival of the RAF’s newest flying-boat- the Short Sunderland. For the men of 230 Squadron gathering on the slipway at Seletar, the approaching aircraft looked formidable and even from a distance, they could spot the powerful array of .303 machine guns it possessed.

As the big aircraft landed and taxied in, it towered over the obsolete bi-planes moored alongside. The squadron had been flying Short Singapore’s ever since they arrived here two years earlier but now, with war looming and recognising the strategic importance of Singapore, the Squadron had been chosen as one of the first units to be re-equipped with the world’s most advanced flying boat - the Sunderland.

Tough and reliable, the Sunderland would prove that it could turn its hand to almost any role that was asked of it. With a range approaching 3,000 miles it was ideal for the long-range maritime reconnaissance patrols it would need to cover the vast expanse of the Indian Ocean, especially following Japan’s callous entry into the war and the fall of Singapore. Sunderlands would play a vital role in protecting the convoys to India and supplying isolated bases across the Indian Ocean.

As the war progressed, Sunderland flying-boats were increasingly used to attack enemy shipping between Burma and Malaya in the Bay of Bengal and over a 32 day period in the summer of 1944 two Sunderlands from 230 Squadron evacuated 537 critically wounded soldiers from the Chindit special forces by landing on a lake deep behind enemy lines in Burma. Following the Japanese surrender 230 Squadron found themselves once more in Singapore, this time to repatriate Allied POWs liberated from Japanese camps.


MIDWAY - THE ATTACK ON THE SORYU by Anthony Saunders

Brimming with overconfidence, few on board the Japanese carrier Soryu noticed the SBD Dauntless bombers gathering overhead. Within a matter of minutes a few courageous US Navy pilots would change the course of history.

Thursday 4 June 1942, and Admiral Yamamoto’s plan to draw what remained of the US Pacific fleet into battle was going well. That morning, before dawn, he had launched over a hundred aircraft to pound Midway’s power plants and oil installations, and the attack had been successful. Now, with his aircraft returned, re- fuelled and re-armed he prepared to launch a second strike to deliver the coup de grace.

By 10.20 the noise on the carrier’s packed flight decks reached a crescendo as the pilots ran up their engines whilst the Sôryû turned slowly into the wind ready to launch. Few were watching the sky above. They failed to spot the SBD Dauntless dive-bombers from the USS Yorktown gathering high overhead. No one noticed as the battle-hardened pilots of VB-3 banked their SBDs and, swooping like hawks on their prey, dived on the carrier below.


WINGS OF GLORY 2014 CALENDAR by The Military Gallery

The Military Gallery introduces the exciting Wings of Glory calendar for 2014. With each month displaying one of twelve stunning images, carefully selected from our unparalleled archive of air combat paintings, our new calendar uniquely includes an account of many significant dates of WWII, making these invaluable to the Aviation and Military devotee.

PATHWAY TO THE RUHR by Anthony Saunders

With silver moonlight glinting on the wave tops below, Guy Gibson leads the first wave of Lancaster’s low across the North Sea to avoid enemy detection, on the night of 16/17 May 1943. In formation with ‘Mick’ Martin on his port side and ‘Hoppy’ Hopgood to starboard, Gibson heads towards the Dutch Coast and the Ruhr valley beyond - their mission, the destruction of the Mőhne and Eder Dams.

BADERS BUS COMPANY - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

On Saturday, 9 August 1941 the unthinkable happened: the legendary Fighter leader Douglas Bader failed to return from a mission over northern France. Immediately, without thought for their own safety, the fiercely loyal pilots of his Tangmere Wing set out on a sweep to search for him, hoping that he may have successfully baled out into the Channel. By nightfall, however, there was no sign of him and everyone feared that their famous Wing Leader might have been lost. A few days later, however, the good news filtered into Tangmere; Bader, renowned as the Fighter Ace with artificial legs, had survived, albeit as a prisoner of war.

JG-52 - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

A Schwarm of Bf109s from JG-52 are about to peel away and, with the battle-cry ‘Horrido!’ ringing in their ears, dive to attack the flight of enemy aircraft spotted below. JG-52: the name alone brought terror into the hearts of the Red Air Force pilots. By the end of the war the Luftwaffe’s most successful Geschwader had claimed over 10,000 victories, and from within its ranks emerged the top three scoring Aces in the history of air combat; Gerhard Barkhorn, Gunther Rall and, of course, the highest scorer of them all – Erich Hartmann.

FLYING TIGERS - THE STUFF OF LEGEND by Robert Taylor

P-40's of the AVG Flying Tigers 3rd Pursuit Squadron - Hell’s Angels - deliver a deadly strafing attack on a Japanese forward air-base in China, summer 1942. With their Allison engines screaming at full throttle, AVG Aces Tommy Haywood and Robert Smith, lead the charge as the Hell’s Angels leave a trail of havoc and destruction behind them.

TO HELL AND BACK - Operation Tidal Wave by Anthony Saunders

Flying at low-level over the Astra Romana oil refinery,Lt James Merrick of the 98th Bomb Group powers his B-24 ‘Lil De-icer’ through the pall of burning debris as time-delayed bombs, dropped in error by a previous Group, explode beneath them. With any hope of surprise now lost, and taking heavy losses in the process, the crews of the 98th bravely hold their bombers on course.

ON COURSE FOR THE MÖHNE DAM by Richard Taylor

Guy Gibson leads the first wave of 617 Squadron’s Lancaster bombers towards the German border and on to the Mőhne dam. After crossing the coast a fraction off course, Gibson adjusts his compass heading slightly and, as the unmistakable thunder of 12 cylinder Merlin engines at full throttle shatters the night, follows the course of a large canal where the owner of an ancient windmill, hearing the noise, hurries outside to witness the event.

HORNBLOWER AND THE INDEFATIGABLE - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s glorious Maritime Masterwork depicting the exploits of eighteenth century naval hero Horatio Hornblower. In this triumphant visual recreation, the Royal Navy frigate Indefatigable, under the command of Captain Pellew and with the young Midshipman Hornblower aboard, engages and captures a French frigate.

AMERICAN CLIPPER FLYING CLOUD - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

For two glorious decades in the mid- nineteenth century, the world’s great sea trading routes were dominated by the magnificent ‘Yankee Clippers’. And none were finer or more famous than the American clipper Flying Cloud, legendary for her world beating speed records, some of which stood for 100 years, and for having a female Navigator - unheard of in 1854!

THE DAMBUSTERS - LAST MOMENTS OF THE MÖHNE DAM by Robert Taylor

The largest dam in Europe, the fortress-like walls of Möhne held back nearly 140 million cubic metres of water essential to the industry and factories of the Ruhr. The Air Ministry had long ago decided that if the Möhne dam, and the two other major Ruhr dams – the Eder and Sorpe – were destroyed, it could deliver a massive blow to the Nazi war machine. But cracking open the mighty dams would require exceptional flying skills; and so, on 21 March 1943, a new squadron was formed specifically for the task, the only time this ever happened in Bomber Command. Known as 617 Squadron and led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, it was not only the squadron that was unique, so was the weapon they would be using – Upkeep – a cylindrical, hydrostatic ‘bouncing’ bomb. The brainchild of Barnes Wallis, Upkeep was designed to skip across the surface of the water, sink against the dam’s massive wall, and explode with enormous force at a precise depth.

THE BREACH - THE DAMBUSTERS 70th ANNIVERSARY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

The Möhne Dam: 17 May 1943, 00.49 hrs - Guy Gibson engages enemy flak positions whilst Lancaster AJ-J, with pilot David Maltby at the controls, banks steeply away after delivering the coup-de-grace. A huge explosion and towering pillar of water marks the breach where a vast torrent begins to flood the valley below.

FINAL BRIEFING - THE DAMBUSTERS 70th ANNIVERSARY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

RAF Scampton: 16 May 1943 20.55 hrs - Guy Gibson readies his crew to climb inside their waiting Lancaster – AJ-G ‘George’. A red flare will soon curl skywards, burning brightly against the sun’s fast-fading rays; it is the signal to start engines and at 21.39 G-George will get airborne, leading the first wave of three aircraft. For the crews of 617 Squadron the weeks of intensive training were now over – Operation Chastise was underway.

Dambusters Lancaster Remarque by Anthony Saunders


THE LONG SHORT DAYS by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s stunning painting, beautifully captures a group of Bf109Gs from III./JG26, as they return to their forward base after a long fighter sweep along the Channel coast in early 1944. In his unmistakable style, and with inordinate skill, Robert deftly evokes a moment of rare tranquillity amidst the carnage of war as the lengthening sun glints across the frozen landscape during the short days of winter.

ARCTIC HURRICANES by Richard Taylor

From a remote and windswept airfield 15 miles north-west of Murmansk in the freezing Arctic wastelands, a small group of RAF Hurricane pilots held the Luftwaffe at bay. Richard Taylor’s evocative scene remembers the ‘forgotten’ heroes of Force Benedict as Hurricane IIbs from 81 Squadron tangle with Luftwaffe Bf109s over snow-clad forests as they escort Russian bombers in October 1941.

CHANNEL SWEEP by Richard Taylor

On 14 June 1940, the first German jackboots were heard on the streets of Paris. Within days France signed an armistice and Hitler could now turn his avaricious eyes north and across the grey waters of the Channel. The island of Britain stood alone and, faced with the threat of imminent invasion, few gave her much chance of survival. Before the all-conquering Panzers could invade, Germany needed to gain air superiority and Goering boasted that his Luftwaffe ‘would quickly sweep the RAF from the skies’ – how wrong he would be. The Battle of Britain began on 10 July 1940 and for the next eight weeks most front-line squadrons were often flying four missions a day. Against overwhelming and seemingly impossible odds, the RAF repelled the Luftwaffe and by the end of October it was over.

CHANNEL SWEEP - PUBLISHERS PROOF by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s stunning new painting depicts Mk1 Spitfires from 92 Squadron undertaking a defensive sweep along the Kent coastline against a dramatic backdrop of the white cliffs of Dover, at the height of the battle in September 1940. The limited edition prints in this fabulous edition have been personally autographed by members of “The Few.”

MUSTANGS ON THE PROWL - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

With the end of the war in sight P-51 Mustangs of the 55th Fighter Group sweep unopposed through the beautiful Rhine valley: One of Robert Taylor’s most iconic images Mustangs on the Prowl depicts the master Ace of the ground attack, Colonel Elwyn Righetti of the 55th Fighter Group. Flying his P-51D Mustang, the CO of 338 Squadron and ‘King of Strafers’, already with over 20 victories to his credit, leads his pilots through the Rhine Gorge, skimming the ancient Castle of Stableck, as they seek out enemy targets on their way back to England.

DANGEROUS COAST - The Banff Strike Wing by Robert Taylor

A large force of Mosquitos from RAF Coastal Command’s Banff Strike Wing exit a deep-sided fjord along Norway’s rugged, heavily defended mountainous coast. In the distance, smoke and explosions reverberate from their successful rocket strike against enemy coastal shipping, destroying yet another cargo of iron ore destined for the furnaces of Germany’s industrial war machine. Above them P-51 Mustangs provide top cover support should any patrolling enemy fighters decide to make an appearance.

EAGLES ON THE RAMPAGE by Robert Taylor

Dominating the skies over Germany, P-51s of the 4th Fighter Group – The Eagles - sweep across the cloud tops, their pilots scanning the distant horizon for any signs of the Luftwaffe. They are ready for trouble should the enemy decide to chance their luck. . . . . .Formed in September 1942 from the RAF Eagle Squadrons, the Fourth Fighter Group was the oldest fighter unit in the Eighth Air Force; Under the command of Don Blakeslee, described as ‘probably the best fighter leader of the war’, the combined air and ground victories notched up by ‘The Eagles’ during World War II surpassed any other fighter group. They were the first to penetrate German air space, and the first to engage the Luftwaffe over Berlin. Hermann Goering later remarked ‘When I saw those Mustangs over Berlin, I knew that the war was lost’.

PHANTOM STRIKE - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

The steel mill at Thai Nguyen was vital to North Vietnam and in 1967 its destruction was a top priority for the USAF. There was a problem however; it was one of the most heavily and well defended installations in the country. On 30 March 1967, the mission to attack the Thai Nguyen steel plant fell to the legendary fighter leader and WWII Ace Robin Olds but it turned out to be one of the most hazardous raids of the Vietnam War.

ACES ON THE WESTERN FRONT - THE GICLEE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

The ancient Norman monastery on Mont St. Michel provides the majestic backdrop as a group of Me109s race across the coast returning to their forward base in northern France after a fighter sweep across the English Channel in early 1941.

OUT OF THE DRAGONS DEN by Richard Taylor

It was the morning of Monday, 18 April 1942 and, taking a final look at the carrier rapidly disappearing into the distance, the B-25s headed west on what each of the five man crews knew was a one-way ride. With luck they might make it to Nationalist China but first they had an important mission to complete - destination Tokyo! Richard Taylor’s powerful painting depicts the scene immediately after the Raiders had carried out their mission. One of the last B- 25 Mitchell's, having successfully bombed its target, makes its escape towards mainland China. As the navigator sets the new course, their path takes them close to targets hit by other Raiders, dark columns of smoke rising rapidly from the burning oil and carnage below.

ADVANCE FROM UTAH by Simon Smith

It had been a rough ride for the men of 101st Airborne’s Easy Company. With heavy flak tearing into the C-47s carrying the paratroopers inland, the original drop plans had gone horribly awry and the men found themselves scattered, many lost without weapons or supplies. They knew that the largest amphibious force in history would be landing on Utah Beach in only a few hours, and was counting on them to secure the area behind the beach. As the Allied landing approached, First Lieutenant Dick Winters and the small force of the dozen men he’d managed to gather were ordered to take a battery of four German 105mm Howitzers at Brécourt Manor, which were zeroed in on Utah Beach. In a remarkable feat of tactics that would be studied and emulated for decades to come, Dick Winters and his tiny force destroyed not only the battery, but also the deadly machine-gun positions nearby.

NIGHT HUNTERS - THE NIGHT SKIES OVER THE REICH PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Leutnant Jorg Cypionka of 10./NJG11 engages a powerful incoming force of fast, high-flying RAF Mosquitos from 139 (Jamaica) Squadron (PFF) in one of his unit’s few remaining ME262A jets. The Mosquito crews, however, know the dangers of these hotly contested skies over Berlin only too well.

BERLIN BOAR FIGHT - THE NIGHT SKIES OVER THE REICH PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

On the night of 23/24 August 1943, a lone Fw190 of the Luftwaffe’s crack unit JG300 Wilde Sau, defiantly engages a force of RAF Lancasters in the heavily defended, flak-torn skies over Berlin. With the heavy bombers illuminated by bursting flak and the fires of the burning city below, the Luftwaffe pilot engages his target, just one of over 700 RAF long-range bombers thrown into the assault that night.

WELCOME SIGHT by Richard Taylor

A peaceful corner of eastern England is temporarily awakened from its summer slumbers by the thunder of Merlin engines, the familiar roar announcing the safe return of a squadron of Lancasters from their latest operation. With wheels already down, the pilots throttle back the huge engines as the heavies make their final approach to the airfield nearby. Below them, quiet will soon return to the countryside and on base, after debrief, the weary bomber crews will take a well-earned rest. They don’t expect it to last long; they could be flying again tonight.

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TOWARDS NIGHT'S DARKNESS by Robert Taylor

As the setting sun casts a golden glow, a group of Lancasters from 576 Squadron form up after departing from their Lincolnshire base at the start of a raid into Germany in late 1944. The lead aircraft UL-I (LM227) was one of only a handful of Lancasters to complete 100 operational sorties.

THE EAGLES DIVIDE by Robert Taylor

It had begun; the end game was inexorably in play. The final defeat of Germany and the end of Nazi tyranny was almost within sight but in the skies over Germany the defiant remnants of the Luftwaffe fought on with savage determination. Ever since the long-range American P-51 escort fighters had first appeared, the skies over the Reich had witnessed grim encounters with the Mustangs taking on the Luftwaffe as they tried to stop the heavy bombers of the USAAF reaching their targets. By early 1945 it was a losing battle, but still the Luftwaffe fought on and, in the resulting maelstrom of combat, the Mustang pilots still had their work cut out against these battle hardened, expert pilots

WOUNDED WARRIOR by Richard Taylor

Like many other missions they had undertaken in the summer of 1944, this one had been particularly cold, tough and dangerous for pilot Harry Seip and the crew of B17G Silver Meteor. The First Lieutenant and his men had set out on that morning, 11 July 1944, from a peaceful Framlingham, on another arduous mission to Munich. With their bomb load dropped the crew headed for home, but the battle-scarred Fortress had been hit more than once, leaving the inner port engine shot out and Silver Meteor had steadily dropped behind the fast-disappearing bomber stream. Things were not looking good for Harry and his crew as the Luftwaffe fighters circled like sharks, closing in for an easy kill. Luckily the enemy pilots were not the only ones that had spotted the ailing Fortress. The P-51s of two of the best Aces in the Eighth Air Force - 'Bud' Anderson and 'Kit' Carson - had also seen the danger and came tearing out of the blue sky into the action. Within minutes the German pilots had fled and the crew of Silver Meteor could breathe a sigh of relief. With these two legendary Aces guiding them home, Harry and his men would survive to fight another day.

OPERATION CHASTISE THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

In one of the boldest precision raids of World War II, the valiant men of 617 Squadron breached the mighty dams of Germany. They were the Dambusters. On the night of 16/17 May 1943, nineteen Lancasters and 133 men from the recently formed 617 Squadron carried out one of the most spectacular precision raids in the history of air warfare. This highly secret undertaking went under the code name of Operation Chastise, but the world would come to know it simply as the Dambuster Raid.

THE DOOLITTLE TOKYO RAIDERS - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

On the morning of April 18th, 1942, just four months following the devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, sixteen Army Air Force B-25 bombers under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle engaged in a daring aerial raid to strike back at the enemy’s capital of Tokyo. For his role, Doolittle was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

TITANIC - LAST FAREWELL by Robert Taylor

Escorted by a bustling flotilla of pleasure craft, the RMS Titanic - the world’s newest and largest liner - creates a majestic sight as she departs Southampton Water at the start of her fateful maiden voyage to New York, 10 April 1912.

BREAKING COVER by Robert Taylor

Concealed in the woods of northern France, Fw190 pilots break cover ready for a quick take-off to intercept Allied bombers in the summer of 1944.

ONE MiG DOWN by Robert Taylor

A formation of Mirages led by LtCol Avi Lanir, commander of 101 Squadron Israeli Air Force, intercepts MiG21's over the Syrian Desert on 9 November 1972. In the ensuing dogfight two of the Syrian MiG's are shot down, one of them from a direct hit by Lanir to score his second MiG victory.

DAWN BREAKERS - A D-DAY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

As the first rays of dawn broke over Gold Beach on the morning of 6 June 1944, twenty- three Halifax bombers from 76 Squadron headed inland over the breaking surf below. Their task: to annihilate the large German coastal gun battery of Mont Fleury that overlooked the beach where elements of the British 50th Division would shortly be landing. Anthony Saunders’ superb painting catches the moment as the Halifaxes, now escorted by American P-51s of the 359th Fighter Group, survey the extraordinary sight unfolding below them. Carried by a vast flotilla of landing craft, the first assault brigades of the 50th Division steam towards the Normandy shore where, despite heavy initial opposition, the British forces soon broke through. By midnight the 50th Division had landed over 25,000 men, and linking up with the Canadians on Juno Beach, had secured a deep bridgehead along a six mile front. The Battle for Caen and their long, slow march to Berlin had begun.

RETURN OF THE HUNTERS - A D-DAY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Throughout the early morning of 6 June 1944, men of the US 29th Infantry Division had fought their way yard by yard across the bloody shingle of Omaha Beach, but the strong German opposition was unexpected. It was the same on most sectors of ‘bloody Omaha’ beach that morning. Showing unparalleled levels of bravery and determination, the US infantrymen finally prevailed and within days the scene on the beach was a hive of activity as ‘Mulberry A’ - one of two giant artificial harbours that had been towed across the Channel – was erected off this once-deadly beach. Anthony Saunders’ intensely graphic new painting depicts a pair of RAF Typhoons from 245 Sqn over the American Mulberry. They race back to their base in Hampshire to re-fuel and re-arm after delivering a blistering rocket attack on German positions behind the everwidening Normandy beachhead.

THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN by Richard Taylor

P-51’s of the famed Tuskegee Fighting Red Tails wind down at their airbase in Italy after a gruelling long range Bomber escort mission over occupied territory.

RED TAIL PATROL by Richard Taylor

Red tailed P-51 Mustangs of the 332nd Fighter Group – the Tuskegee Airmen – patrol high over enemy territory after yet another successful bomber escort mission.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

THUNDER IN THE EAST by Richard Taylor

On 20 October 1944 a composite air force, made up of P-47 Thunderbolts from 261 and 146 Squadrons, carried out a low level attack on the vital Japanese stronghold at Mingaladon Aerodrome near Rangoon. After completing his bombing attack Warrant Officer Thomas ‘Lucky’ Carter flying his distinctive P-47 'Pistol Packin’ Mamma', engages Nakajima Ki-43 Oscars and Ki-44 Tojo's along with other Thunderbolts of the unit.

THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM by Robert Taylor

Dawn had broken to reveal another glorious day in paradise, and on board the USS Arizona and the repair ship USS Vestal alongside, the crew were taking it easy. All next week they would be hard at work preparing for sea, but today was Sunday, and that meant light duties. But within the hour out of nowhere, Japanese carrier-based aircraft would descend upon the unsuspecting Naval base. As the crews register bright red circles on their wings, the blood froze in their veins. They realized that hell had come to Pearl Harbor!

THE WAY WE WERE Pearl Harbor, Sunday 7th December 1941 by Robert Taylor

Reproduced directly from Roberts working drawing, this outstanding companion print is issued with every edition of THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM, creating a fitting commemorative collectors edition for the 70th Anniversary of this historic event.

WINTER'S WELCOME THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s magical English winter landscape welcomes another American Fortress crew home to safety. For those on the ground there were few sights more stirring than a B-17 Fortress on its final approach from a combat mission, and Robert Taylor’s outstanding painting Winter’s Welcome is no exception. This now legendary image conjures up those exhilarating final moments as an exhausted pilot and his crew bring their mighty warbird safely home to the welcoming winter countryside of East Anglia.

WINTER HOMECOMING THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

A new dawn reveals the straggler’s long awaited return as the damaged Lancaster struggles to keep airborne on the final leg of its long journey home. For over five years the young men of RAF Bomber Command fought a long, unceasing and always bitter struggle against the mighty war machine of Nazi Germany. Magnificently brave, they endured fearful odds frightening losses and some of the most terrifying flying conditions imaginable, yet they persevered unflinchingly. The extraordinary heroism of those men is reflected by the twenty-three Victoria Crosses awarded during that time. One aircraft above all others came to symbolize that gallantry: The Lancaster.

THE SLEEPING GIANT AWAKES by Richard Taylor

On Sunday December 7, 1941 the free world had been stunned into disbelief by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The devastating assault on the headquarters of the US Pacific Fleet had left over two thousand American servicemen dead, most of her battleships destroyed or damaged, and the remains of nearly 200 American aircraft lay in tatters. America reeled from the shock and sheer incredulity. By 4.10pm the following day America was formally at war, and five thousand miles away the first of the carriers, the USS Enterprise, was returning to Pearl Harbor.

DAY OF INFAMY by Anthony Saunders

On the morning of Sunday 7 December 1941 the Japanese launched their infamous attack on Pearl Harbor. Surprise was complete; within a few terrifying minutes, bombs and torpedoes had damaged or destroyed much of the US Pacific Fleet peacefully at anchor, and almost all of the fighters on the ground. But as an Aichi D-3A bomber targets the battleship California, a lone P-40 has managed to get airborne in the chaos to engage the enemy.

D-DAY DROP 'STICK 21' by Robert Taylor

At 23.45 on the night of 5 June 1944, the 101st Airborne’s most legendary unit of combat paratroopers – the notorious ‘Filthy Thirteen’ – jumped into France near the village of Sainte Mère Église, in the final hours before the D-Day landings.

JET HUNTERS by Robert Taylor

On 10 April 1945 thirteen hundred bombers of the Mighty Eighth set out to destroy the last of the Luftwaffe’s jet force. But, unknown to the bomber crews and their fighter escort, the enemy jets were already airborne and waiting to spring their deadly trap. As the war in mainland Europe entered its final, bloody phase, the German Armies defending Berlin fought on with a savage determination, slowly disintegrating before the mighty weapon of war unleashed against them. What remained of the Luftwaffe was mercilessly pounded from the air, their airfields hammered relentlessly. Aircraft, fuel, spare parts, ammunition and pilots all in short supply but still they fought on, with deadly effect. At the forefront of the German offensive and pivotal during the defence of the Reich, were the highly advanced jet fighters of the Luftwaffe, and in particular the legendary Me262.

DAY DUTIES FOR THE NIGHT WORKERS by Robert Taylor

As the massive Lancaster looms majestically over them, the ever vigilant ground crew begin the task of preparing ‘their’ aircraft for the coming night’s operation. Checking, repairing and double-checking again, making sure that nothing goes wrong on the next trip, nothing that could endanger the lives of the crew who depend on them. It will be a race against time.

DAY DUTIES FOR THE NIGHT WORKERS - VC EDITION by Robert Taylor

The matted print that makes up the VICTORIA CROSS EDITION of Day Duties for the Night Workers - se emain edition for more information

BITTER ENGAGEMENT by Robert Taylor

Just after midday on 27 September 1940 one of the bitterest engagements of the Battle of Britain took place in the skies over Kent when the Spitfires of 19 Squadron took on the Bf109s of JG54. In the huge dogfight that ensued, 19 Squadron claimed 8 enemy aircraft destroyed.

UNDAUNTED BY ODDS by Robert Taylor

Hurricane Mk1s of 303 "Koœciuszko" Polish Squadron RAF climb steadily out from Northolt to intercept yet another incoming Luftwaffe bomber formation heading for London in September 1940. Ably led by Canadian Flight Commander, Flt Lt Johnny Kent, the battle-hardened Polish pilots will soon be engaging the enemy over Southern England, their Hurricanes once again in the thick of the action.

DEADLY ENCOUNTER by Robert Taylor

During the early stages of the Battle of Britain as the Luftwaffe made further incursions into mainland Britain and with the RAF hard pressed to hold the line, a Hurricane of 32 Sqn begins his roll away from a successful attack on a D017 over Kent.

BOMB AWAY! by Robert Taylor

Holding his Lancaster AJ-P steady at 60ft above the waters of the Möhne Dam, 'Mick' Martin releases the cylindrical, bouncing bomb to send it spinning towards the dam wall. In a few moments a huge explosion will erupt up in to the night sky as the hydrostatic bomb detonates against the mighty granite walls. On the night of 16/17 May 1943 nineteen specially modified Lancasters of 617 Squadron departed from RAF Scampton on one of the most secret and daring bombing operations undertaken during World War II to destroy the huge hydro-electric dams in the Ruhr valley. Codenamed Operation Chastise, it was to become one of the most dangerous precision bombing raids ever undertaken,

The Battle of Britain: Portraits of the Few by

The Battle of Britain: Portraits of the Few is an exceptional tribute to the small group of legendary pilots that served with the Royal Air Force through one of the most critical periods of the Second World War.

EASY COMPANY - MOVING ON by Chris Collingwood

Major Dick Winters and the men of Easy Company, 101st Airborne Division, take up a holding position in the Normandy town of Carentan on 14 June 1944, eight days after their dramatic parachute drop into Normandy on D-Day. Specially commissioned by the Military Gallery this outstanding image brings these heroic warriors to life with stunning realism

HORNCHURCH SCRAMBLE - matted tribute drawing by Richard Taylor

This drawing accompanies the Tribute Edition of Hornchurch Scramble. Not available individually

THE CHANNEL DASH - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Undetected, the battlecruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, together with the cruiser Prinz Eugen and supporting vessels, had escaped from the French port of Brest, and were making an audacious dash - in broad daylight and under the noses of the enemy - to the safety of the Elbe Estuary. But first they must sail through the Straits of Dover, one of the narrowest and most heavily defended straits in the world. Everything depended on surprise - and air cover. Given the job of providing that air cover was one of Hitler’s youngest Generals, Adolf Galland, who through diligent planning and daring tactics ensured the operation was a complete success. Galland later described the mission as one of the most important and successful of his career.

STING OF THE BLACK TULIP - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

The Sting of the Black Tulip was the first in Robert Taylor’s immortal ‘Hartmann Trilogy’, and portrayed events on 7 August 1943 when Erich Hartmann, the world’s highest scoring Ace, claimed seven victories in a day.

JG-52 THE GRAPHITE EDITION by Robert Taylor

It was the foundation upon which the Luftwaffe was built and flew throughout WWII. It was flown by some of the greatest fighter Aces of all time, and credited with more air victories than any other fighter in history. It was the Messerschmitt Bf109. One of the finest fighter aircraft ever to take to the skies, the Bf109 was flown by the Luftwaffe’s greatest Aces - men like Hartmann, Galland, Rall, Reinert and Krupinski

LIBERATION - SAINTE MÈRE ÉGLISE, JUNE 1944 by Richard Taylor

For nearly four years, the swastika had flown belligerently over the small town of Sainte Mere Eglise in Normandy. Suddenly, shortly after midnight on the night of 5/6th June 1944, parachutists from the 82nd Airborne Division began landing in and around the town. By 04.30, after a tough fire fight, troopers from the 505th PIR had raised another flag over the town – the Stars and Stripes – and Sainte Mere Eglise had become the first town in Normandy to be liberated by the Allies on D-Day. Sherman tanks landing on nearby Utah Beach with the US VII Corps were soon passing through the newly liberated town on the way to the front.

ATLANTIC CONVOY by Gerald Coulson

It was tough, dependable and, for a German U-boat, deadly. But for the crews who manned the ships of the North Atlantic convoys the Sunderland flying boat was to become a legend; for them it was the sentinel of the seas. Winston Churchill wrote that the only thing that really worried him during the war was the submarine menace, he knew that if the vital North Atlantic lifeline was severed, there could be no ultimate victory. The task facing the Allies was immense, and the Battle of the Atlantic raged for nearly three years before, in May 1943, heavy losses forced Admiral Doenitz to pull his U-boats out of the North Atlantic. That same month five submarines were sunk by Sunderlands. It was the turning point of the Battle of the Atlantic, and for the the next year the Allies were able to build up supplies and troops for the D-Day invasion.

EVENING PATROL by Gerald Coulson

As the sun sets over the Humber Estuary, pilots of 610 Squadron return their MkII Spitfires to Leconfield after a convoy patrol in 1940. During the early part of World War II the coastline of Britain was constantly under threat, particularly the busy shipping lanes of the North Sea as the Luftwaffe battled to disrupt supplies. To protect them, however, were the young pilots of RAF Fighter Command, who were to play a vital role protecting the convoys and fishing fleets, together with offensive long-range patrols to seek out and destroy any enemy aircraft. Fighter squadrons being ‘rested’ during the Battle of Britain, would often be moved to northern locations to carry out these operations before returning to the more intense fighting in the south. But these patrols were no easy rest; they were usually long, always arduous and more often than not highly dangerous.

LOW PASS OVER THE MÖHNE DAM by Anthony Saunders

Operation Chastise, the plan to destroy the mighty Ruhr dams, was bold, audacious and dangerous. It was also set to become one of the most legendary combat missions ever undertaken in the history of aviation warfare. In late February 1943 a unique decision was taken by the RAF to form the now legendary 617 Squadron, a highly specialised unit within Bomber Command. Its task was to be the destruction of the huge Möhne, Sorpe and Eder dams, which provided vital services to German industry. Tasked with providing the crews for this new squadron was the young, outstanding, bomber and night-fighter pilot Wing Commander Guy Gibson, already a veteran of 174 bomber operations. On 21 March 1943 the unit was formed at RAF Scampton under his command, and the chosen men had just eight weeks to prepare for the task in hand.

STAND EASY by Simon Smith

During a short respite from the heavy fighting on D-Day, paratroopers from the 101st Airborne stand easy outside a recently liberated café as they await orders for their next objective.

PEGASUS BRIDGE - AIRBORNE STORM by Simon Smith

Let by Major John Howard, men of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry storm their way across Pegasus Bridge, just after midnight on the morning of 6 June 1944.

DEAD MAN'S CORNER by Simon Smith

Men of the 101st Airborne launch a lighting patrol across the bitterly contested road junction just outside the village of St Come-du-Mont on 8 June 1944.

THE ROAD FROM UTAH by Simon Smith

Paratroopers of the 101st Airborne lead American armored units through the recently liberated village of Saint Marie Du Mont during the advance from Utah Beach, shortly after D-Day.

THE LIBERATION OF BAYEUX by Simon Smith

On the morning of 7 June 1944 British armoured units enter the centre of Bayeux, the first city in France to be liberated by the Allies following the D-Day Landings.

MASTERS OF THE SKY by Richard Taylor

Led by their Commanding Officer Major George Preddy, the P-51 Mustang pilots of the 328th Fighter Squadron engage in a bitter struggle with Luftwaffe fighters in the cold winter air high over eastern Germany. They have been escorting B-17 Fortresses attacking the heavily defended synthetic oil plant at Merseberg, November 1944. As the B-17s turn safely towards home above them, Preddy skilfully manages to down one of the attacking Fw190s in the ensuing melee.

PREPARING FOR ACTION by Richard Taylor

Vital to any unit were the hardworking ground crews whose job it was to keep the mighty warbirds of the Eighth flying. Richard Taylor’s wonderfully emotive drawing Preparing for Action features Major George Preddy’s crew chief Art Snyder together with his crew as they work frantically to ready the P-51Ds of the 352nd in readiness for yet another sortie.

THE HARD WAY HOME by Robert Taylor

The Battle of Britain had been won by the young fighter pilots of Fighter Command, but now it fell to another band of young men to wage total warfare against the Nazi war machine – the aircrew of RAF Bomber Command. A lone Halifax of 405 Sqn RCAF struggles home the hard way – damaged and alone. One of the aircraft’s engines is already out and another is smoking badly as the exhausted pilot and his crew fight to keep their unwieldy bomber airborne. Any marauding Luftwaffe fighters would have found them easy prey, but fortunately they have been spotted by a formation of Hurricanes from 253 Sqn on a routine patrol. For that final leg of their long journey this crew will at last have protection to see them safely back to base.

BLUE NOSE! by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful painting Blue Nose! portrays the P-51s of the 328th Fighter Squadron high above towering cumulus clouds over East Anglia in November 1944. Led by Major George Preddy, the P-51 pilots prepare to escort a large formation of B-17s on yet another arduous long range mission to Germany.

FIRST STRIKE by Richard Taylor

Led by Wing Commander J.B. Nicolson VC, CO of 27 Squadron (the Flying Elephants) based in north-east India, a pair of Mosquito FBVIs power their way home across jungle-covered hills of northern Burma. They have just completed the squadron’s first combat operation, a successful strike against Japanese ground targets along the vital railway link near Mandalay, Christmas Day 1943.

BOLD, RECKLESS AND SUPREME by Robert Taylor

Canadian Flight Lieutenant Johnny Kent leads the Hurricanes flown by the Polish pilots of No.303 Squadron during September 1940 – at the height of the Battle of Britain.

VALIANT RESPONSE - THE HARDEST DAYS PART III by Robert Taylor

The Spitfires of 54 Squadron, quickly scrambled from nearby Hornchurch, clash with the Me109s from 1./JG51 over Kent. Below, Me110s from KPRG210 are about to receive unwelcome attention as the rest of the Spitfires hurtle down upon them and in the distance, a group of Hurricanes rip through a dense formation of Do17s from KG76 as they struggle back to France. What clouds there are will be unlikely to give much sanctuary and, for the onlookers on the ground far below, the skies will soon be filled with weaving trails of smoke and debris. For nearly a week the Luftwaffe had thrown everything they had into the attack on southern England in order to annihilate RAF Fighter Command, in preparation for Operation Sealion, the invasion of Britain. And, heavily outnumbered, the young RAF Spitfire and Hurricane pilots of Fighter Command had so far repelled them, at a cost. But on Sunday 18 August 1940, the Germans launched the heaviest formations of aircraft seen in the battle so far. This was to be a grinding day of relentless assaults on the airfields of southern England, the ‘hardest day’ of the Battle of Britain.

VALIANT RESPONSE - matted Tribute drawing by Robert Taylor

This drawing accompanies the Tribute Edition of VALIANT RESPONSE. Not available individually

ROAM AT WILL - THE BATTLE FOR ITALY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Returning to base after an arduous escort mission, Captain Art Fiedler leads a flight of P51 Mustangs from the 325th Fighter Group - the Checkertail Clan - through the Po Valley in northern Italy seeking out targets of opportunity amongst the retreating Axis forces, July 1944. When in December 1943 the 325th Fighter Group, the Checkertail Clan, had moved into south-eastern Italy they were soon escorting American bombers on long range missions deep into occupied Europe. In two years of air combat the Checkertails soon became one of the crack units in the Fifteenth Air Force, destroying a staggering 537 enemy aircraft in the air, and accounting for many more on the ground.

BATTLE OF THE BRENNER - THE BATTLE FOR ITALY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

The last remaining units of the fascist Italian Air Force attempt to engage B25s from the 340th Bomb Group who have successfully destroyed a vital enemy rail bridge in the strategic Brenner Pass, northern Italy, 10 April 1945. The enemy Me109s are completely routed by escorting P51 Mustangs of the 325th Fighter Group who are quickly on the scene.There was only one way the Germans were going to re-supply their beleaguered army in Italy against the relentless assault of the Allies pushing northwards – and that was through the Brenner Pass in the Alps. The Allies knew that if they could destroy this strategic labyrinth of heavily defended road and rail bridges, the enemy would either be forced to surrender, or perish. And the task of destroying these bridges fell to men of the US Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Forces who must fly their heavily-laden bombers dangerously close to the rugged Alpine peaks, and endure a pounding from the anti-aircraft guns lining the narrow pass below. Not to mention any roving enemy fighters, or the turbulent weather over the mountains.

LAST FLIGHT HOME - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

Last Flight Home must be one of the most acclaimed and well-remembered of all Robert Taylor’s great MasterWork paintings. Painted in warm glowing colours and set within the glorious confines of the beautiful English countryside, this is one of the most memorable studies of the mighty Avro Lancaster bomber ever created. The peace and tranquillity of haymaking is momentarily disturbed by the thunderous return of a squadron of Lancasters. All eyes on the ground turn skywards as the great four-engined aircraft of the last flight home make their final approach to the neighbouring airfield after a raid over enemy territory. The men of Bomber Command have come home. It was these brave men to whom Winston Churchill turned when he saw no other route to victory except the destruction of industrial Germany.

RETURN OF THE BELLE - THE GICLÉE STUDIO PROOF by Robert Taylor

There can be few more stirring sights than a B-17 Flying Fortress coming home after a long and arduous daylight mission over occupied Europe, and Robert Taylor’s inspired painting Return of the Belle has come to symbolise the huge role played by the bombers of the U.S. Eighth Air Force in Europe during World War II. The famous Memphis Belle, skippered by Captain Bob Morgan, became the first B-17 in the 91st Bomb Group to complete 25 missions, and returned home to the US with a crew that had been decorated more than 50 times. Set in gentle Cambridgeshire countryside, Robert Taylor gives us an engaging view of the Memphis Belle as she returns from one of her early missions on a late autumn day in 1942. It was a typical scene that would be re-enacted across countless airfields in England as the heroic airmen of the Mighty Eighth Air Force fought with unstinting sacrifice for the liberation of Europe and the free world.

Robert signing Return of the Belle giclee by


HORNCHURCH SCRAMBLE - THE HARDEST DAYS PART II by Robert Taylor

On August 12th, 1940 the Luftwaffe turned their full attention to the RAF's forward fighter bases and radar stations with the intent to obliterate them once and for all. The outcome of the Battle of Britain hung in the balance. It was late in the afternoon of Sunday, 18 August 1940. The previous week had seen the hardest days of fighting in the Battle of Britain as the young pilots of the RAF Fighter Command had engaged in deadly duels with the Luftwaffe. Bystanders gazed cautiously upwards at the weaving contrails in the clear blue skies over southern England as they anxiously awaited the outcome. For just a moment, all was at peace: A gentle breeze floated across the airfield at RAF Hornchurch as the exhausted young pilots of 54 Squadron could rest for a few brief minutes and reflect on their own previous two encounters with the enemy that day. The Luftwaffe had thrown everything at them in the past few days, but today had been the toughest of them all. And then the calm was shattered by the shrill tones of the alarm, the Luftwaffe had launched another huge raid of over 300 aircraft across the Channel, and it looked like Hornchurch was the target.

INTO THE FRAY by Richard Taylor

Squadron Leader Douglas Bader leads the Hurricanes of 242 Squadron in an aggressive diving attack upon a large force of Heinkel 111s approaching the Kent coast, whilst Spitfires from 66 Squadron tangle with the escorting Bf109s of JG52. It is September 1940, and the climax of the Battle of Britain.

AIR ARMADA - THE HARDEST DAYS PART I by Robert Taylor

In just six weeks Hitler’s forces had overrun Western Europe as once-proud armies swiftly fell before the might of the German ‘Blitzkrieg’. It was a devastating defeat, and now only Britain stood alone. Few thought she could survive. As Churchill pledged that Britain would never surrender, a German invasion seemed inevitable. But before any invasion could take place the Luftwaffe must neutralise the RAF and win control of the skies over southern England. Awaiting them was a small, but resilient band of young men, the pilots of RAF Fighter Command. On 12 August, the Germans turned their full attention to the forward fighter bases and radar stations, hoping to obliterate them once and for all. From Norway in the north, through the Low Countries and northern France to Brittany in the west, the Luftwaffe threw every available aircraft into the attack. For the young men of Fighter Command the next seven days of fighting would leave them exhausted and all but spent: They were to be the hardest days of the Battle of Britain, culminating on Sunday 18 August

EVENING REFLECTION by Richard Taylor

With soft evening sunlight radiant behind them, Hauptmann Wolfgang Ewald, Gruppenkommandeur of 1./JG52, leads a schwarm of Bf109s back to their base near Calais after another hectic encounter with pilots of RAF Fighter Command during the Battle of Britain, September 1940.

WELCOMING RESPITE by Robert Taylor

It has been another hard day of ferocious air combat over southern England, but at long last the young pilots of 603 Squadron can take a short, yet welcome respite from the heavy fighting. Soon however, the roar of Merlin engines will fill the air again as another deadly Luftwaffe raid threatens.

INTO THE FRAY - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Richard's pencil work is nothing short of superb and widely regarded as amongst the best in the industry.

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN COMMEMORATIVE BOOK AND PRINT SET by Robert Taylor

This outstanding new 128-page case-bound book is printed on heavy weight art paper and contains over 150 images, including Roberts most famous Battle of Britain paintings, reproduced in full colour – perfectly illustrating the events of this crucial period of Military History. The magnificent limited edition book is accompanied by a superb luxury embossed slipcase. Each book is personally signed by Robert, individually numbered and issued with a matching numbered copy of his outstanding new print:

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN COMMEMORATIVE BOOK by Robert Taylor

This outstanding new 128-page case-bound book is printed on heavy weight art paper and contains over 150 images, including Roberts most famous Battle of Britain paintings, reproduced in full colour – perfectly illustrating the events of this crucial period of Military History.

MORAL SUPPORT - A BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s stirring painting was inspired by the late Group Captain Peter Townsend’s vivid description of an event that happened to him whilst in command of 85 Squadron during the Battle of Britain. Flying Officer Jim Marshall, was struggling to keep his Hurricane in the air after a collision during an engagement - it was barely flying. Townsend stood guard over the crippled aircraft, and using hand-signals guided the young pilot safely back to their base at Debden. It was a typical act of unselfish leadership from one of the RAF’s most highly regarded fighter leaders.

RETURN OF THE FEW - BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Robert Taylor

One of Robert Taylor’s most iconic and best-loved images of the Battle of Britain, RETURN OF THE FEW portrays a loose formation of Spitfires from 92 Squadron heading back to their base after a successful sortie over northern France. As the fighters approach the indomitable white cliffs near Dover, the pilots have decided to make a protective low-pass over a group of Royal Navy armed steam trawlers buffeting up the Channel, operating in their new-found role of inshore coastal patrol. The trawlermen acknowledge their RAF comrades with a friendly wave

FEAR NOTHING - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

The Battle of Britain is at its height but the threat of invasion is still a deadly reality. As the country waited, grim and expectant, for Hiltler’s Operation Sealion to be put into action, Blenheims from 105 Squadron make another strike against German troop barges assembling in the northern French port of Boulogne. Overhead, escorting Hurricanes of 501 Squadron engage in a savage tussle with Me109s of JG3. An outstanding piece released to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain

MERLIN CHORUS - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Fresh from a successful action over marauding Me110s and Me109s attempting a raid on Portland during the Battle of Britain, Spitfires of 152 Squadron, with the distinctive sound of their Merlin engines echoing around Lulworth Cove, return to their base at Warmwell to re-fuel and re-arm. Thankfully all will land safely, ready to continue the bitter struggle while Goering’s Luftwaffe intensify their attacks as they try to gain air superiority during one of the most decisive battles ever fought. An outstanding piece released to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain

THE GREAT ESCAPE by Richard Taylor

“Everyone in this room is living on borrowed time. BY rights we should all be dead! The only reason that God allowed us this extra ration of life is so we can make life hell for the Hun… three bloody deep, bloody long tunnels will be dug – Tom, Dick, and Harry. One will succeed!” With those words the chief escape officer in Stalag Luft III, Squadron Leader Roger Bushell RAF, announced his plan for perhaps the most daring escape attempt of the war – the mass breakout of 200 men through the digging of three long tunnels (nicknamed Tom, Dick, and Harry), an audacious feat of tunnelling that would be long and dangerous. Just after 22.00hrs on the night of 24/25 March 1944, the first escapee broke through to the surface – only to find it well short of the surrounding trees. The escapees would have to crawl to the cover of the trees under the noses of the patrolling sentries. Richard Taylor’s masterful new piece captures the scene as POWs escape into the cool night air and realize, to their dawning horror, that their planned exit has fallen short of the woods.

THE RAILWAY & COMING UP SHORT by Richard Taylor

Exclusively limited to 76 pairs in memory of the 76 men who managed to escape the camp during THE GREAT ESCAPE!

THE RAILWAY
A tiny wooden railway, operated with rope-pulled trolleys, was constructed along the entire length of the tunnel Harry to carry men and equipment, and remove earth. On the night of 24/25 March 1944 it ferried the escaping POWs rapidly through the tunnel to the exit shaft.

COMING UP SHORT
As the first POWs break through to the surface from the tunnel Harry on the night of 24/25 March 1944, the dreadful realisation is made that the exit has come up 10 feet short of the woods surrounding Stalag Luft III.

ACTION THIS DAY by Richard Taylor

Flown by many crews, Halifax LV907 ‘Friday 13th’ was typical of the four-engined heavy bombers that formed the backbone of RAF Bomber Command, and served as a symbol to the enduring bravery of the men who flew the ‘heavies’ in action. As dawn breaks over RAF Lissett it reveals that last night’s biting wind has once again brought a covering of snow to the airfield. But, with conditions forecast to improve, tonight’s operation to bomb industrial targets in Germany is set to proceed, and ground crew start to prepare Halifax Mk3 LV907 ‘F-Freddy’, simply known as ‘Friday 13th’, for action.

EISMEER PATROL - THE KRIEGSMARINE PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

On the morning of March 11th 1943, Fw190s from IV./JG5 fly escort to the mighty battleship Tirpitz and a screening fleet of destroyers and torpedo boats as they begin a voyage north to Bogen Bay during Operation Rostock. Designed to evade the increasingly frequent British bombing raids, the Tirpitz joined an impressive German naval battle fleet gathering near Narvik. In this fleet, it posed a grave threat to Arctic convoys before its destruction on November 12th, 1944.

BREAKOUT - THE KRIEGSMARINE PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

The pride of the German Kriegsmarine, the battleship Bismark, breaks out from Norwegian waters into the open sea on the evening of May 21st 1941, accompanied by an escort fleet and a complement of Me109s from 3./JG77 and Me110s from ZG76. It's voyage would be short lived, however. After a shattering victory over Britain's famous HMS Hood, the Royal Navy hunted and eventually sunk the mighty battleship on May 27th, 1941.

HOLDING THE TIDE by Richard Taylor

– THE BATTLE FOR GUADALCANAL – On 7 August 1942, just eight months after the dramatic events at Pearl Harbor, the United States First Marine Division stormed ashore on the island of Guadalcanal. It was the opening gambit of the land war in the Pacific. Richard Taylor’s new masterpiece portrays Captain Joe Foss as he leads the F4F Wildcats of VMF-121 back to Henderson Field after a day of desperate fighting against the Japanese in the skies over the steaming jungles of Guadalcanal in November 1942. It would be another three months before the island was finally secured, during which time Joe Foss would achieve an astonishing 26 victories to become the first American pilot to equal WW1 Ace Eddie Rickenbacker’s score.

WHERE THE EAGLES GATHERED by Robert Taylor

ROBERT TAYLOR'S NEW VOLUME OF AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS FEATURING AN EXCLUSIVE LIMITED EDITION PRINT On 5 March 1944 the B-24 bombers of the 448th Bomb Group took off from England, their mission - to destroy the Luftwaffe facilities at Limoges aerodrome in western France. But waiting for them were the Bf-109s of JG2, ready to rip into the attacking force at the first opportunity. Luckily for the bomber crews they had one of the finest fighter escorts in the Mighty Eighth, Don Blakeslee’s 4th Fighter Group – 'The Eagles'. As a straggling B-24 comes under attack and its inner starboard engine starts to trail smoke, Steve Pisanos, one of the Fourth’s most deadly Aces, and fellow P-51B pilots quickly arrive on the scene to break up the attack. The Liberator now has a chance to get home.

NORMANDY NEMESIS by Robert Taylor

ROBERT TAYLOR'S NEW VOLUME OF AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS FEATURING AN EXCLUSIVE LIMITED EDITION PRINT When Johnnie Johnson led the Mk IX Spitfires of his 144 Canadian Wing to temporary airstrip B.3 near the village of St Croix sur Mer, a few miles inland from the Normandy beach head, they were making history. As they landed on the hastily constructed Summerfield mesh track­ing runway on D-Day plus 9, they became the first Allied air force unit to be based in former occupied Europe, and the first to operate in France after D-Day. Mk IX Spitfires of 443 Squadron RCAF, based at St Croix sur Mer tangle with a group of Fw190s whom they had encountered on a fighter sweep near Alençon, in southern Normandy on 23 June 1944. During the melée that followed, their Squadron Leader, Wally McLeod, quickly destroyed two Fw190s, whilst another Fw190 was badly damaged.

Air Combat Paintings Vol VI US cover - with foreword by PETER JACKSON by Robert Taylor

To have one volume of paintings published would see many artists reach the pinnacle of their career, but Robert Taylor is something special. Widely acknowledged as the foremost aviation artist in the history of the genre, this new volume in his best-selling Air Combat Paintings series is, incredibly, Volume SIX! Already being spoken of as the finest volume of his works ever published, this new edition brings you his very latest and up to date work accompanied by informative text written with refreshing originality and sparkle. This wonderful new 128 page case-bound book is printed on heavy weight art paper and contains over 70 images reproduced in full colour, supported by a host of beautiful drawings and informative photographs, including many images never previously seen, and gold-blocked titles emblazon the spine. Readers will experience some of the world’s greatest air battles as visualised by the world’s master of aviation art, and the story of how these masterworks came into existence. This outstanding book is available with a choice of two different specially produced jackets - one to represent the USAAF and the other the RAF and Commonwealth - the choice is yours!

Air Combat Paintings Vol VI UK cover by Robert Taylor

ROBERT TAYLOR AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS VOLUME VI-RAF and Commonwealth cover WITH FORWORD BY PETER JACKSON Multi Academy award winning film director, producer and screenwriter. To have one volume of paintings published would see many artists reach the pinnacle of their career, but Robert Taylor is something special. Widely acknowledged as the foremost aviation artist in the history of the genre, this new volume in his best-selling Air Combat Paintings series is, incredibly, Volume SIX! Already being spoken of as the finest volume of his works ever published, this new edition brings you his very latest and up to date work accompanied by informative text written with refreshing originality and sparkle. This wonderful new 128 page case-bound book is printed on heavy weight art paper and contains over 70 images reproduced in full colour, supported by a host of beautiful drawings and informative photographs, including many images never previously seen, and gold-blocked titles emblazon the spine. Readers will experience some of the world’s greatest air battles as visualised by the world’s master of aviation art, and the story of how these masterworks came into existence. This outstanding book is available with a choice of two different specially produced jackets - one to represent the USAAF and the other the RAF and Commonwealth - the choice is yours!

GUARDIAN ANGEL by Gerald Coulson

As Britain holds itself ready for perhaps the greatest battle it has ever fought, a pair of Mk 1 Hurricanes of 213 Squadron set out from their base at Biggin Hill for an early morning patrol over the Channel, they could meet the enemy at any moment. As they cross the coast, they are joined in spirit by a 213 Squadron Sopwith Camel from an earlier conflict. With the Battle of Britain poised to begin the great task of defending the nation will fall upon their shoulders. But at least for today the spirit of their guardian angel will be at their side.

OPENING SKY by Robert Taylor

With the morning sun glinting on their fuselages, P-51 Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group cross the Dutch coastline far below, heading back towards their base at Duxford, England at the end of a long sweep east of the Rhine crossing in Spring 1945. The final months of the war in Europe lie ahead, and for the P-51 pilots the victory is within sight. Robert Taylor’s visually poetic masterpiece, Opening Sky, pays tribute to the American P-51 Mustang fighter pilots who flew and fought for freedom during World War II, and is the third in his highly successful Tribute Series. It follows the release of his popular RAF Hurricane tribute, Height and Sun; and Luftwaffe Me109 tribute Dawn Eagles Rising.

JUNO BEACH - D-DAY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

As shells from the naval bombardment whistle overhead, and ground-fire crackles around them, a pair of Mk IXb Spitfires from 412 Canadian Squadron make a fast run over Juno Beach, in support of the Third Canadian Division storming ashore. Landing craft negotiate their way through choppy seas and mined beach obstacles to discharge men at the water’s edge, ready to assault the high sea wall, as tanks begin to open fire on nearby enemy positions.

PHANTOM FURY by Robert Taylor

The biggest, fastest, most powerful fighter of its day, the McDonnell Phantom was an awesome war machine that came to dominate aerial combat for over two decades. It may have been the size of many World War II bombers but it could out-perform anything that crossed its path; it was quicker, could turn faster, was better equipped with electronics, carried more ordnance than anything comparable, and it had an unbelievable rate of climb. The F-4 Phantom was the benchmark against which every fighter in the world came to be judged; it was simply the best. Robert Taylor’s powerful new painting shows Steve Ritchie, first into action, flying his lead F-4D Phantom through a hail of deadly enemy flak as he exits the target area after a typical FAST FAC mission on enemy installations in North Vietnam, 1972. Behind him a vast trail of devastation marks the mission’s progress, as his fellow Phantom crews continue to wreak havoc with their heavy ordnance, the target area exploding in a series of mighty detonations.

BRIDGE BUSTERS - D-DAY PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

With orders to destroy, delay or disrupt enemy forces en-route to the Normandy battle area, P-47 Thunderbolts from the 78th Fighter Group launch a blistering high-speed, low-level attack, on a German freight train in occupied northern France, June 1944. Desperately attempting to transport vital supplies to the front by daylight, it has fallen prey to the cannons and bombs of the eagle-eyed Thunderbolt pilots.

FINAL DESCENT by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor's dramatic portrayal of Horsa gliders as they land, laden with troops, in occupied France during Operation Overlord - the Allied invasion of Europe.

ROLLING THUNDER by Richard Taylor

Sherman tanks, having fought their way inland, rumble through the battered streets of a small Normandy town, recently liberated by the US Airborne forces.

SAINTE MERE EGLISE - the drawing edition by Richard Taylor

St. Mère Église - the first town to be liberated by Allied soldiers on the morning of June 6th, 1944, when, at 6.30 men of the Airborne Rangers parachuted into the town.

DAWN TILL DUSK by Richard Taylor

COMMEMORATING THE 65th ANNIVERSARY OF D-DAY – JUNE 6th Fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson leads MkIX Spitfires of his 144 Canadian Wing back to their base at Ford after a long day of operations over Normandy shortly after D-Day. The wing flew constant fighter sweeps throughout the Normandy Invasions, before relocating to France on June 15th1944. This superb new edition is personally signed by outstanding Aces who flew with the Canadian Wing during the Normandy Invasions, under the leadership of the highest scoring RAF Ace of WWII – Johnnie Johnson.

OUT OF THE NIGHT THE FIRST TO GO IN by Robert Taylor

Silently out of the night they came. With flaps deployed, three timber and plywood Horsa gliders swept swiftly down through the night skies, rapidly closing with their objective – Pegasus Bridge over the Caen Canal. On board, with tension etched deep into their blackened faces, men from the Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, part of the British 6th Airborne Division, braced themselves for landing. They, and sappers from the Royal Engineers, were about to become the first fighting force to land in France on D-Day. They were about to make history. This new graphite collectors edition is personally signed by veterans who fought in the epic encounter at Pegasus Bridge, assaulted the beaches and one of the six Halifax pilots who towed the gliders into action on that momentous night.

DAWN EAGLES RISING by Robert Taylor

September 1940: And the Battle of Britain is reaching its crescendo as the Me109s of 1./JG52, with their bright yellow noses glinting in the sun, gather speed and altitude as they form up shortly after take-off from their base at Coquelles, near Calais. Robert Taylor’s classic new limited edition Dawn Eagles Rising, commissioned as the second in a series with the recently released Height and Sun, is published in tribute to the fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe during World War II.

EASY COMPANY - MOVING ON THE AIRBORNE COLLECTION by Chris Collingwood

RECORDING THE HISTORY OF EASY COMPANY, AND THE MEN OF THE AIRBORNE DIVISIONS. Specially commissioned by the Military Gallery to accompany the outstanding new limited edition book, Easy Co. 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment – In Photographs, Chris Collingwood has painted yet another outstanding masterpiece that cements his reputation as one of the world’s foremost military portrait painters. His portrayal of Major Dick Winters and the men of Easy Company, 101st Airborne Division, as they take up a holding position in the Normandy town of Carentan on 14 June 1944, eight days after their dramatic parachute drop into Normandy on D-Day, brings these heroic warriors to life with stunning realism.

THE DAMBUSTERS – INBOUND TO TARGET by Robert Taylor

The crews of 617 Squadron that took part in the epic Dambusters raid on the night of 16/17 May 1943 were among the finest in the RAF. They were the elite of Bomber Command, and when they left RAF Scampton that night, the skills of their pilots – some of the finest of the Second World War, would be tested to the limit. In this outstanding new work Flight Lieutenant ‘Mick’ Martin, in company with Flight Lieutenant John Hopgood in the distance, follows one of the many canals of Holland, wingtips barely missing the sails of the windmills, en-route to the Möhne Dam. Delicately crafted in a subtle, unique blend of pencil and paint, Robert's latest masterpiece is a truly stunning and highly individual rendition of this most famous mission. Printed on the latest precision press, each of these exclusive limited edition prints is a true and faithful reproduction of his masterful original.

ARCTIC HUNTERS by Richard Taylor

High in the Arctic Circle a bitter war of attrition was fought in freezing, unforgiving conditions, the desperate conflict played out against a majestic, awe-inspiring backdrop of beautiful ice-clad mountains. Richard Taylor's spectacular new painting portrays the Me109s of 6./JG5 led by Oberleutnant Heinrich Ehrler, while based at Petsamo in Finland, as they soar high above the towering peaks of ice capped mountains glistening in the cold polar air, March 1943. Their dawn patrol keeps constant vigil along the glacial fjords of the Norway's far-northern coastline, as the majestic vista gives the battle-hardened Me109 pilots a brief moment of tranquillity far removed from the grim and bitter battles being fought below.

THE ROAD TO THE RHINE by Robert Taylor

On Sunday 17 September 1944, the first day of Operation Market Garden, C-47 Dakotas of the 439th Troop Carrier Group dropped thousands of paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions into Holland, a hundred and fifty miles behind enemy lines. This daring operation, the largest airborne assault of World War II, aimed to capture and secure vital bridges in the Allies’ push towards the Rhine.

THE ROAD TO THE RHINE - the concept drawing by Robert Taylor

The sky is thick with C-47 Dakotas as Paratroopers of the 101st Airborne drop into Holland during one of the largest airborne assault’s in History - Operation Market Garden on September 17th 1944. Robert Taylor is the arguably the greatest exponent of pencil work in the aviation art industry and this new piece is nothing short of breathtaking, capturing an atmosphere and detail seemingly impossible in pencil.

LONG HARD ROAD by Robert Taylor

The men of Easy Company, 101st Airborne Division, prepare for their parachute drop into occupied territory from Upottery airfield on the eve of the D-Day, June 1944. This outstanding pencil print is issued as the companion to THE ROAD TO THE RHINE BY by Robert Taylor

THE BAND OF BROTHERS TRIBUTE PROOFS by Robert Taylor

Released only with THE ROAD TO THE RHINE by Robert Taylor. With ALL the components of the 101st Airborne Edition, the Tribute Proofs are released with a unique, ORIGINAL, hand-signed and hand-numbered pencil drawing by artist Robert Taylor. The rarity of these FIVE Tribute Proofs is unsurpassed and each spectacular drawing is conservation matted to include a replica ‘Screaming Eagle’ patch.

A WELCOME RETURN by Anthony Saunders

Released as a pair with CLASH OF EAGLES, the latest compelling painting from Anthony Saunders portrays the relieved but weary, crew members of ‘Ol Gappy’ of the 379th Bomb Group, as they nurse their battle scarred B-17G back to their base at Kimbolton. Close behind them, the remainder of the group, relieved to see familiar territory, makes its final approach after the grueling mission to Meresburg on 11 September 1944.

DAWN STRIKE by Richard Taylor

As the first rays of daylight spread their golden glow over the vast expanse of sky above the Russian Front, the menacing roar of heavily armed Bf 110’s of 6./ZGI shake the cold air around them as they prepare for a dawn strike against enemy ground targets deep inside Russian territory. Above them, their Me 109 escorts, alert for danger, constantly scan the distant skies for any enemy intruders that may be on the prowl and waiting for them.

CLASH OF EAGLES by Anthony Saunders

Released as a pair with A WELCOME RETURN, Anthony Saunders' new painting, CLASH OF EAGLES, features P-51 Mustangs of the 20th Fighter Group, flying out of Kings Cliffe to engage Me109’s from JG77 in a furiously contested dogfight. Below them a formation of B-17’s from the 379th Bomb Group fly through the chaos, doggedly maintaining their course, as they head on to attack the huge synthetic oil refinery at Meresburg, southern Germany, on 11 September 1944. So vital was this refinery to the Nazi war machine that it became one of the most heavily defended targets in Germany, the air defences even surpassing those of Berlin.

HOLDING THE LINE by Richard Taylor

Skillfully led by their mercurial commander, SS-Hauptsturmführer Michael Wittmann, the Tiger Tanks of s.SS-Pz. Abt. 101 blaze through a shattered French village in the days following D-Day, June, 1944. Their destination – Normandy!

HOLDING THE TIDE TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Available with the Tribute Edition of Holding the Tide

HEIGHT AND SUN by Robert Taylor

In Robert Taylor’s outstanding new painting, Hurricanes of 32 Sqn climb high into the morning sky, gaining Height and Sun in an attempt to take the advantage over the onslaught of enemy fighters - August, 1940. Featuring a typical ‘Robert Taylor skyscape’ this new image captures the surreal calmness above the clouds, belying the fury of action and ultimate sacrifices made in those crisp blue skies.

MILNE BAY – THE TURNING POINT by Robert Taylor

The Battle for Milne Bay in New Guinea was a story of true grit, determination, and valour; it was the moment when the Imperial Japanese Army tasted defeat on land for the first time in nearly three centuries. In the space of two weeks, the Japanese attempt to capture Milne Bay was halted, and any ambitions they might have held to invade Australia, thwarted. And that victory was due in no small part to the Kittyhawks of 75 and 76 Squadrons RAAF. Robert Taylor’s powerful new painting depicts Kittyhawks from 75 and & 76 Squadrons RAAF, returning to No 1 Strip after attacking Japanese positions during the Battle for Milne Bay. Under the starboard wing of the lead aircraft, ‘Polly’, the smoke of action is clearly visible as the Japanese press from their landing site, along the coast towards the airstrip. ‘Polly’, now beautifully restored, resides in the Australian War Memorial Museum in Canberra, a tribute to the men and machines who stopped the Japanese in New Guinea.

TYPHOONS OUTWARD BOUND by Richard Taylor

In the months following D-Day, Hawker’s hard-hitting, snub-nosed Typhoon struck terror into the German formations in Normandy, crack Panzer units wilted under the constant hail of rockets and bombs. Several times a day the Typhoon pilots would cross the Channel to run the gauntlet of flak and ground fire, and deliver their lethal cargo. The Typhoon’s lethal weaponry is clearly visible in Richard Taylor’s beautiful new painting Typhoons Outward Bound. As another fine summer day begins, Typhoon Mk1b’s of 247 Squadron are en-route to theNormandy battlefront, the first of several missions that day. Skimming at mast-top height, the Typhoons pass over two ancient steam drifters, conscripted into the wartime role of patrolling the Channel and, should the need arise, rescuing any downed aircrew in need of help.

OPEN ASSAULT by Robert Taylor

The Junkers Ju87 Sturzkampfbomber, known to the British simply as the Stuka, had already acquired a deadly reputation across Europe, its siren screaming as the ungainly dive-bomber struck terror into the hearts of those below. In 1940 its pilots crossed the Channel with their grim-looking aircraft to terrorise the southern towns and ports of England. Robert Taylor’s memorable painting ‘Open Assault’, depicts Hurricanes of 501 Squadron attacking a force of Ju87 Stukas as they dive-bomb naval vessels and installations in the port of Dover on 29 July 1940. High explosive bombs detonate within the sheltered anchorage as escorting Bf109s from JG51 race in to protect their lumbering charges. Four Stukas and two Me109s are despatched, for the loss of just one RAF aircraft.

HOMEWARD BOUND - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Released as the companion to HIGH SUMMER in the Battle of Britain Portfolio, Anthony Saunders’ compelling new painting brings to life a typical cameo from those long and arduous aerial contests during the Battle of Britain; an Me109 from JG-26 has taken a hit during the fighting, the engine is overheating, and beginning to trail smoke. But the Squadron Commander, the legendary Adolf Galland, closes in to escort the stricken fighter back across the Channel. Crossing the iconic white cliffs of Dover, the drama, depicted in this new Battle of Britain Portfolio series, has time to run.

HIGH SUMMER - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN PORTFOLIO by Anthony Saunders

Released as a pair with HOMEWARD BOUND, Anthony Saunders’ new painting High Summer, the second canvas in his new Battle of Britain Portfolio, portrays Spitfires from 92 Squadron as they successfully engage Me109's over the harvested fields of southern England, in August 1940. The desperate action of aerial combat is beautifully captured in this compelling and accurate reconstruction of a famous fighter squadron at war.

TACTICAL SUPPORT by Richard Taylor

When it came to hammering German ground forces in the days after D-Day, Lockheed's outstanding P-38 Lightning gained an awesome reputation. Richard Taylor's evocative new painting recreates the scene over Pegasus Bridge shortly after D-Day as a pair of P-38 Lightnings thunder inland in support of the advancing allied armies. Below, signs of the recent action are still plainly visible as trucks and their exhausted drivers hasten back to the beach-head to collect reinforcements.

THE WOLFPACK by Robert Taylor

On 26 November, 1943, the P-47s of the 56th Fighter Group were tasked to escort B-24 Liberators of the 392nd Bomb Group on a dangerous mission to attack the heavily defended industrial and dockyard facilities in the German port of Bremen. Zemke knew the Luftwaffe would be waiting for them as they approached the target, and they were – in force! It was to become a day of high drama. With the Luftwaffe throwing all the fighters they could muster at the American heavy bombers,a massive aerial battle ensued. In the running dogfights high over Bremen, the “Wolfpack” claimed their most successful action of the war with 23 confirmed kills, 3 probables, and 9 damaged, creating an all-time record in the European Theatre. The 392nd’s B-24 Liberators could not have been in safer hands on that eventful day.

THE BIFF BOYS by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s new aerial masterwork captures perfectly the scenario on that decisive morning in November 1917. Lt. Powell is seen pumping a deadly burst of machine gun fire into a diving Albatross as the aerial duel wheels and turns in a magnificent skyscape high above Cambrai.

PUTTALAM ELEPHANTS by Robert Taylor

Commissioned by one of the Corsair pilots stationed at HMS Rajaliya in 1942, Robert Taylor’s superb painting Puttalam Elephants is one of many originals by Robert hanging in the wonderful art collection of the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton. Much admired by tens of thousands of visitors each year, this painting depicts the unusual tactics as employed at Puttalam in order to keep the land based naval fighters flying. Operating happily in conditions where towing tractors became quickly bogged down, the Puttalam Elephants provided an invaluable service, and became much loved by the pilots and ground crews.

DAWN TILL DUSK - TRIBUTE PROOFS by Richard Taylor

This item is not sold separately but is available with the Tribute Edition of Dawn till Dusk

Dawn Eagles Rising (Artist Proof Matted) by Robert Taylor

This is the Artist Proof of Dawn Eagles Rising complete with matted signatures - a total of 33 signatures.

DAMBUSTERS by Anthony Saunders

Immediately following their devastating attack on the Möhne Dam,the specially modified Lancasters of 617 Squadron successfully breach the second of Germany’s mighty western dams – the Eder, on the night of the 16/17th May, 1943. After hitting the target with pinpoint precision, pilot Les Knight and Flight Engineer Ray Grayston battle with the controls of Lancaster AJ-N in order to clear the high ground beyond the dam as a torrent of water erupts into the valley below them; the wall of the Eder Dam is rent apart and collapses.

EN-ROUTE by Anthony Saunders

Flying at altitudes as low as fifty feet, Lancasters of 617 Squadron follow the Dutch canals en-route to Germany - their target, the mighty Dams of the Rühr - on the night of the 16 / 17 May 1943. At such low level the pilots of many of the specially modified Lancasters found their flying skills tested to the extreme as they were forced to take violent evasive actions when they encountered flak, large electricity pylons and tall trees, but several of the gunners in the crews still managed to shoot up and damage a number of trains on the way.

SILENT FORTRESS by Randall Scott

The Military Gallery is pleased to announce the release of a outstanding Limited Edition print from a specially commissioned painting by Randall Scott, There are few scenes quite so evocative as the vision of a once mighty warbird resting silently in its watery grave, a tranquil underwater world so alien to the world that it was created to fly and fight in. Far removed from the hostile skies of Europe and the long hours of tension, cold and extreme danger endured by its crew, this potent warrior now lies peacefully, its guns silent and quiet forever in the shallow waters of the Mediterranean where it came to rest so many years ago. This is without doubt an extraordinary and moving tribute to those young airmen of the USAAF.

EAGLE FORCE by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's tribute to the young American volunteer pilots who joined the RAF to fight for freedom at the time when Britain stood alone against the Nazi domination in Europe. This magnificent painting features Spitfire Vbs of 71 Squadron RAF as they return to their base at North Weald, September 1941, the young American pilots perhaps taking a brief moment to marvel at the myriad colours of the late evening sun –welcome relief from the perils of recent air combat with the Luftwaffe high above the English Channel.

Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson

With its sleek, graceful design, instantly recognisable by its thin, aerodynamically advanced elliptical wings, the Supermarine Spitfire was the creation of R. J. Mitchell, an aeronautical creative genius. His fighter was to become not only the most important Allied aircraft of World War II, but the most famous British fighter in history. Gerald Coulson's majestic new painting captures a pair of Spitfire Mk1s at dawn high above the clouds over southern England in late 1940. An iconic tribute from the artist to the greatest fighter aircraft of all time.

THOSE VALIANT FEW by Robert Taylor

The Battle of Britain commenced at the beginning of June 1940, and for the next two and a half gruelling months the young men of Royal Air Force Fighter Command, duelled with the cream of Goering's Luftwaffe over the skies of southern England. It was to become the greatest aerial conflict in aviation history. Always outnumbered, the valiant young pilots fought with a determined fierceness and intensity, and never once did their spirit waver. By the end of September the battle was won, but many had made the ultimate sacrifice.

EASY COMPANY - THE TAKING OF CARENTAN by Chris Collingwood

"You have a rendezvous with destiny!" – promised Major Gen William Lee to his men as the 101st Airborne Division was activated at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, 15 August 1942. And the first place they kept that rendezvous was Normandy. Specially commissioned by the Military Gallery, this dramatic new limited edition by Chris Collingwood, one of Britain’s foremost figure artists, portrays the men of Easy Company as they fight their way through the bullet-swept streets of Carentan. Facing the enemy in close combat house-to-house street fighting, the paratroopers relentlessly pounded the enemy until the last vestiges of German resistance were overwhelmed and the objective taken. But for the men of Easy Company and the 101st Airborne, this action is just the beginning of their distinguished but savage war. Others will follow: the liberation of the first Dutch city, Eindhoven; the siege of Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge; and ultimately, the capture of Hitler’s ‘Eagles Nest’ at Berchtesgaden.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the most collected artists in the industry and the demand for his original work is huge. His pencil work in particular is extremely popular and his superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

Patrolling the Top End by Robert Taylor

This is the companion Print to the Publishers proof edition of MILNE BAY – THE TURNING POINT and is not available individually.

VITAL FORCE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s poignant new painting captures eloquently the urgency of a scramble – an everyday occurrence during those frantic days in the summer of 1940. Battle of Britain ace Flight Lieutenant Ian Gleed leads a detachment of Hurricane Mk1s from 87 Squadron as they climb out of their Exeter airfield during the peak of the battle in the high summer of 1940.

VOL VI US & UK Cover by Robert Taylor


NORMANDY NEMESIS & WHERE EAGLES GATHERED by Robert Taylor


CLOSING THE GAP by Robert Taylor

As Typhoon Mk1b fighter-bombers of 247 Squadron exit the target area near Falaise at full throttle, the havoc wreaked in their wake bears witness to the devastation of their powerful rockets. Fuel and ammunition from the retreating German column explode with shattering detonations, the savagery of the attack demoralising the enemy into stunned oblivion. The Typhoons will hurtle back to base to re-arm and hastily re-fuel, ready for yet another withering strike on the encircled Wehrmacht columns. This stunning new rendition from the the worlds premier aviation artist pays tribute to the brave young RAF fighter pilots of the twenty squadrons of rocket-firing Hawker Typhoons who flew those perilous ground attacks during the Battle of Normandy. With each print in this new limited edition signed by pilots who flew in the thick of the action of the air war on the Western Front, knowledgeable collectors are given a rare opportunity to complete an important section in their valuable print portfolios.

THE GREAT ESCAPE - THE ENTRANCE by Ley Kenyon

The night of 24 March 1944 has gone down in history as one of the bravest and most daring escape attempts of the entire war. This was the night of ‘The Great Escape’. Over 200 inmates of the Prisoner of War camp Stalag Luft III in Sagan, Germany were ready and prepared with forged papers, maps, civilian clothes and an indomitable desire to be free. The Military Gallery, in conjunction with the RAF Museum in Hendon, are extremely proud to offer a very limited edition print of one of those six immortal images created by Ley Kenyon. ‘The Entrance’ shows the opening of tunnel ‘Harry’, hidden beneath the stove in Hut 104, one officer helping another into the 30- foot vertical shaft, as a ‘stooge’ keeps an eye out for patrolling German guards.

RED HOT PURSUIT Soviet Aces of the Eastern Front by Simon Atack

Fighter Ace, First Lieutenant Stepanenko Ivan Nikiforovich, leads Yak 9's of the 4th IAP in pursuit of an Me109, during a contact on the Eastern Front, in the late summer of 1943.

THREATENING SKIES by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor's latest painting, recreates an encounter on 19 February 1945. As dawn breaks over the Pacific, a determined force of Japanese Ki-44's launch a surprise attack on a large formation of USAAF B-29 Superfortresses as they approach the Japanese mainland. B-29 gunners let rip as one fighter flashes past, with a second fighter closing at high speed. Chunks of the B-29's port wing and aileron have been taken out in the initial attack, and with another Japanese fighter fast on its tail, the outcome of this particular encounter hangs in the balance. A total of ten Superfortresses fell victim that day.

DAMBUSTERS-BREACHING THE EDER DAM by Robert Taylor

Pilots Shannon and Maudsley tried time and again to position their laden bombers correctly before managing to release their weapons – but the dam still held. Now success depended solely on Knight carrying the last bomb! With time and fuel now a concern, Knight’s first effort to position, like Shannon and Maudsley before him, failed, but his second run favoured the brave. Knight released his bomb with absolute precision, striking the wall at precisely the crucial point. With a tremendous explosion the Eder Dam collapsed before their eyes. Robert Taylor’s sensational new painting vividly shows the dramatic moment of impact. In the cockpit Knight and flight engineer Ray Grayston fight the controls to clear the dam, combining their physical strength to haul the lumbering Lancaster up and over the dam and to clear the high ground that lies ahead. Below and behind them, the second of Germany’s mighty western dams lies finally breached.

Companion Print by Robert Taylor


A Pack of Wolves - matted by Robert Taylor


RED TAIL ESCORT by Richard Taylor

In Richard Taylor’s striking new painting, the Tuskegee “Red Tail” pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group are a more than welcome sight as they close in to escort home a damaged B17 Fortress of the 483rd Bomb Group. Seen high over the Italian Alps during the summer of 1944 this poignant scene conveys precisely the story of the legendary “Red Tails”, and with every print in Richard’s new edition signed by six surviving pilots from this remarkable group of airmen, collectors will surely want to add this spectacular print to their aviation art portfolios.

HORRIDO! by Robert Taylor

Appropriately, Robert Taylor has chosen the Me109s of JG52 as his subject to represent the fighter pilots of the Luftwaffe in his new tribute to these courageous flyers, with his breathtaking painting Horrido! With the traditional battle cry ringing in their ears, Squadron Commander Hptm Wolfgang Ewald leads pilots of I./JG52 into combat. Based at Coquelles/Calais in September 1940, the JG-52 Me109s hurtle down in a high-speed dive to engage the enemy during the ferociously fought Battle of Britain. Robert eloquently depicts these sleek and deadly fighters high over the Channel, glinting and menacing against an ominous backdrop of heavy cumulous clouds - the world's foremost aviation artist's skill bringing to life the Luftwaffe's most successful fighter aircraft in action.

Easy Company - Moving On. Collectors Edition Book by Chris Collingwood

Issued with the four signature print MOVING ON this is a matching-numbered copy of the book EASY COMPANY, 506th P.I.R. – IN PHOTOGRAPHS. Hand-bound by craftsmen using part leather and M1942 jumpsuit material, the book features a sewn replica ‘Screaming Eagle’ patch on the cover, is enclosed within a black cloth-covered slipcase, silk screened with golden parachutists, and contains an exclusive book plate signed by five more Easy Company Veterans.

RABAUL - FLY FOR YOUR LIFE by Robert Taylor

For their outstanding contribution to the war in the South Pacific, the 'Black Sheep' were awarded one of only two Presidential Unit Citations accorded to Marine Corps squadrons during the war in the Pacific. With typical mastery, Robert Taylor has brought to life an encounter over Rabaul in late December 1943, paying tribute to one of the US Marine Corps most famous fighter squadrons, and its outstanding leader. With the Japanese airbase at Rabaul visible in the distance, 'Pappy' Boyington and his fellow pilots of VMF-214 tear into a large formation of Japanese Zekes and a series of deadly dogfights have started, one Zeke already fallen victim to their guns.

Camels on Patrol by Robert Taylor

Issued as the companion print to The Biff Boys. This print is not available individually.

Close Shave by Robert Taylor

The companion print to the Portfolio Proof Edition of THE BIFF BOYS

SUMMER OF ’42 by John D. Shaw

In this superb tribute to one of the most famous fighter units of World War Two the serenity of the beautiful Li River is broken as P40 Tomahawks of the AVG Flying Tigers, bearing their famous shark-mouth motif, return to base at Kweilin.

THE HORNET'S NEST by John D. Shaw

Lt. Col. James H.Doolittle confers with Capt. Marc A. Mitscher on the bomber-laden deck of the U.S.S. Hornet as the fateful day of 18 April 1942 approaches. This daring bombing raid on Japan gave America and its allies a badly-needed morale boost in the wake of the destruction at Pearl Harbour.

TOMMY LEADER by Robert Taylor

This outstanding limited edition print has been signed by leading Battle of Britain fighter pilots, issued with matching-numbered book 'Tommy Leader' by Tom Dalton-Morgan. Robert Taylor has miraculously captured the mood so typical of those long frantic days: Fresh from yet another hectic combat high over the south coast, Flight Lieutenant Tom Dalton-Morgan and his wingman, hurry their Hurricane MkIs of 43 Squadron back to base at Tangmere. More fuel, more ammunition, a sandwich and a cup of coffee, and with that familiar roar of Merlin engines they will be airborne again, ready to engage the next wave of Luftwaffe raiders. In a few fleeting weeks Tom Dalton-Morgan will be promoted to Squadron Commander.

DAMBUSTERS -THE MORNING AFTER by Gerald Coulson

Of the many thousands of heroic night raids accomplished during RAF Bomber Commandʼs long six year campaign, one, above all, captured the imagination of an admiring public. Gerald Coulsonʼs new painting shows a single Lancaster of 617 Squadron, one of the lucky ones having made it safely back to base, proudly standing alone as if in tribute to those that didnʼt return.

VITAL SUPPORT by Robert Taylor

Crucial to every squadron in the RAF were the unsung heroes of World War II - the ground crew. Without the vital support of these dedicated men who refuelled the aircraft, rearmed them, maintained them and kept them flying, the pilots and aircrew would, quite simply, never have got into the air. Robert Taylor's drawing VITAL SUPPORT, the latest in his new Graphite Portfolio Series, shows ground crew bombing up a Mosquito of RAF Bomber Command.

RAMRAIDERS by Richard Taylor

As the Allied Air Forces began their massed attack on Germany’s oil refineries, the Luftwaffe was about to hit back with a new battle tactic– the Sturmgruppe! Richard Taylor’s exciting new limited edition captures the scene: Closing at high speed with all cannons blazing, Unteroffizier Willi Maximowitz is seen flying his distinctive “Black 8” with IV Sturm/JG3, as he dives in to attack a formation of USAAF B-24s from the 93rd Bomb Group. The American gunners have a frightening task on their hands to fend off the attack until help arrives.

Vickers Vimy by Richard Taylor

The Vickers Vimy was designed to be used as a bomber in WWI but became most famous for the first ever trans-Atlantic flight flown by John Alcock and Arthur Brown in 1919. Completed in a medium that is becoming Richards speciality - pencil highlighted with acrylic paint - this excellent drawing is an example of the outstanding work that Richard is capable of producing

HOLDING THE LINE by Richard Taylor

German Tanks commanded by Hauptsturmfuhrer Michael Wittmann, blaze through a village in Normandy whilst attempting to repel the Allied Invasion, during the summer of 1944.

Erwin Rommel by

Erwin Rommel, the most respected German militaryvcommander of WWII, commanded the 7th Panzer Division during the invasion ofvFrance. Promoted to general, he commanded the new Afrika Korps, successfully driving the British 8th Army out of Libya, but was eventually defeated at El Alamein in 1943. Approached in 1944 to join the plot to assassinate Hitler, Rommel refused suggesting Hitler be arrested and brought to trial. By now in command of the German Army in France, even Rommel was unable to halt the Allied advance following the D-Day invasion, and in July 1944 encouraged Hitler to surrender. But Hitler had discovered Rommel was plotting against him and offered the him the option of suicide, a state funeral and protection for his family, or face trial for high treason. Erwin Rommel took the honourable decision.

VITAL SUPPORT – The De Havilland Prototype Edition by Robert Taylor

This TWELVE signature edition is personally signed by ten Mosquito WWII Mosquito aircrew and conservation matted to include an original fragment of Madapolam fabric that belonged to de Havilland 98 Mosquito Prototype W4050. Also matted are the original autographs of two of the greatest Mosquito pilots of all time.

FURY OF ASSAULT by Robert Taylor

When Luftwaffe bombers first appeared in force in the night skies over London in September 1940 they heralded the beginning of The Blitz - the most sustained period of concentrated bombing aimed at British cities during World War II. Robert Taylor’s evocative new painting brings to life the frightening scenario of the Luftwaffe’s night bombing campaign. It is December 1941, and London is once again under concentrated attack. With fires raging below, the armada of German bombers is clearly visible in the night sky as they sweep across the city. Shimmering in the glow of destruction, a lone Hurricane night-fighter from 85 Squadron, based at nearby Gravesend, engages Heinkel 111s of KG55 in a desperate attempt to break up the formations.

ACTION THIS DAY TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

See main edition for further details

DESERT SHARKS by Robert Taylor

THE FIRST RELEASE IN THE GRAPHITE PORTFOLIO A NEW SERIES OF LIMITED EDITION PENCIL PRINTS - With his outstanding and world-renowned talent for pencil drawing, Robert captures precisely the arid heat, dust and smoke of desert warfare, conveying an air of impending conflict.

THE ROYCE RAID by Richard Taylor

In early April 1942, under the command of General Ralph Royce, and almost a week before the Doolittle raid – seven B-25C Mitchells and three B-17 Fortresses of the 5th Air Force, lifted off from their base in Australia and headed for the staging field at Del Monte on the island of Mindanao, in the Philippines. Richard Taylor’s new painting shows one of 5th Air Force B-25C Mitchell taking off from the Del Monte on Sunday 12 April 1942, en-route to hit the harbor and shipping targets at Cebu. In the three days of Royce’s raids, the Mitchells flew over twenty sorties, sinking and seriously damaging three Japanese transport ships, and shooting down three enemy fighters. In a triumph of surprise aerial strikes, all seven B-25s and their crews returned safely to base.

CRASH LANDING by Robert Taylor

A Glider Pilot brings his fully laden CG-4 Waco into the Normandy battlefield D-Day, 6th June, 1944

DAY OF THE RISING SUN by Richard Taylor

The companion print to THE SLEEPING GIANT AWAKES. See main edition for details

ROVER PATROL by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s new painting presents a fine study of a lone Mosquito FB MkVI of 143 Squadron, part of a larger formation of the Banff Strike Wing, high over the Norwegian fjords on an armed rover patrol to seek out enemy surface shipping and submarines, in February 1945. The beauty of the early morning sun, glinting on the snow-covered mountain-tops, contrasts with the menacing job in hand. Bravery, inordinate flying skills, and determination were a prerequisite for the crews of Coastal Strike Command - rare qualities admirably conveyed in Richard’s new rendering.

BOLD, RECKLESS AND SUPREME - MATTED TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor

Canadian Flight Lieutenant Johnny Kent leads the Hurricanes flown by the Polish pilots of No.303 Squadron during September 1940 – at the height of the Battle of Britain.

SCHWEINFURT - THE SECOND MISSION by Robert Taylor

Briefing at 0500 hours on the morning of 14 October 1943 brought the crews of the 92nd Bomb Group news they didn’t want to hear: “It’s Schweinfurt again!” The same message was being repeated in USAAF bomb group briefing rooms all over eastern England in the early hours of what was to become forever known as “Black Thursday”. Robert Taylor’s majestic new painting shows Colonel Budd Peaslee’s B-17 Equipose, piloted by Kemp McLaughlin, leading the Fortresses of the 92nd Bomb Group en-route to the vital ball-bearing factories at Schweinfurt.

RHAPSODY IN BLUE by Gerald Coulson

THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SPITFIRE 1936-2006. Gerald's majestic study of Spitfire prototype K5054, resplendent in its new all-blue paint scheme, is seen banking high above the clouds during an early test flight in March 1936.

Pearl Harbor 70th Anniversary logo by


DAYS OF THUNDER by Richard Taylor

Duxford became home to the 78th Fighter Group when they arrived in England with their P-47B Thunderbolts in 1943. The objective of the American fighter units was to gain air superiority over the Luftwaffe in support of their daylight bombing campaign. By 1944 they achieved their objective. Richard Taylor commemorates the valiant contribution of the 78th Fighter Group with a fine new rendition showing P-47D Thunderbolts departing Duxford en route for the north coast of France, and a low-level strafing mission. It is the spring of 1944, and with the Normandy invasion just days away, the Thunderbolts are already painted with invasion markings. A striking and emotive painting from a rare emerging talent.

Screaming Eagle patch by


82ND AIRBORNE PATCH by


Jake McNiece by


Jack Wormer by


James Megellas by


Milton Schlesener by


Ed Tipper by


Bill True by


Bill Maynard by


Frank Soboleski by


Herb Suerth by


Bob Bearden by


The Filthy Thirteen by


BLACK NOVEMBER DAY by Robert Taylor

On the morning of 8 November 1944, with Kommando Nowotny’s Me262s still plagued by mechanical problems, Major Walter Nowotny stands down after his aircraft’s jet turbine fails to ignite. Later, in the early afternoon, he took off in company with Lt. Frank Schall. After downing a B-17G, and probably a P-51D, he reported an engine failure. His last transmission before the crash in which he died, included the garbled words “burning – on fire”.

BLACK NOVEMBER DAY - MATTED TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor

This incredible TWENTY-EIGHT signature edition contains all the elements found in the Jet Hunters’ Edition, but the main print is further signed by two P-51 pilots that scored victories over the Me262 jet. Captain WALTER GROCE Shot down an Me262 on 1 Nov 1944 – 3½ victories in total. Captain ROSCOE BROWN The Tuskegee pilot downed an Me262 0n 24th March 1945 – 2 victories in total.

INTO THE TEETH OF THE WIND by Robert Taylor

Bound for Tokyo, Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle launches his B-25 Mitchell from the heaving deck of the carrier USS Hornet on the morning of 18 April, 1942. Leading a sixteen-bomber force on their long distance one - way mission, the Doolittle Raiders completed the first strike at the heart of Imperial Japan since the infamous attack on Pearl Harbour four months earlier. Together, they completed one of the most audacious air raids in aviation history.

Heroic Endeavour by

This book accompanies the Bomber Command and Victoria Cross Editions of DAY DUTIES FOR THE NIGHT WORKERS

DUAL VICTORY by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor brings to life a spectacular dogfight over Eisenach on 24 March 1945 when the doughty Clyde East, returning from a recce over Schweinfurt and with photos already in the can, takes on a group of six Me109’s. Flying his legendary ‘Lil Margaret, having already dispatched one, he peels round to line up his second Me109 to add two more victories to his remarkable tally.

Top Dog by Robert Taylor

A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN WHO FLEW THE MOSQUITO. Completing a record 213 operational sorties with Bomber Command’s Pathfinder Force, Mosquito LR503 became one of the most successful aircraft in the Royal Air Force during World War II. It flew first with 109 Pathfinder Squadron, and then 105 Pathfinder Squadron, completing more combat missions than any other Allied aircraft.

High Cost by Robert Taylor

A TRIBUTE TO THE MEN WHO FLEW THE LANCASTER. The crews of Bomber Command faced one of the most daunting tasks, calling for courage sustained night after night, in conditions of desperate danger and discomfort. They did not fail us and 55,573 paid the supreme sacrifice”. In his new tribute to “The Many”, Robert Taylor’s evocative painting HIGH COST recreates a typical scene encountered by many Royal Air Force bomber squadrons on raids over enemy occupied territory: Having already survived 30 successful operational sorties, on 9 February 1945 Lancaster PG-G of 619 Squadron has been intercepted by Luftwaffe night-fighters during a raid over Stettin Bay.

Easy Company - Moving On. De-Lux Portfolio Book by Chris Collingwood

Issued with a matching-numbered four-signature copy of MOVING ON, each de-luxe book is hand bound in full leather, with the badge of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment gold-blocked on the cover. These Portfolio Edition books are contained within a tough buckram box, screen-printed with golden parachutists. Inside the box, accompanying the book is a replica US War Department envelope containing facsimiles of Major Dick Winters’ ID card, his jump certificate, a letter from Bill Lauer sent January 1945, General McAuliffe’s Christmas letter during the Battle of the Bulge, and the 506ths PIR 1942 Christmas menu, AND an exclusive book plate signed by a further SEVEN veterans of EASY COMPANY.

BITTER ENGAGEMENT - TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

Just after midday on 27 September 1940 one of the bitterest engagements of the Battle of Britain took place in the skies over Kent when the Spitfires of 19 Squadron took on the Bf109s of JG54. In the huge dogfight that ensued, 19 Squadron claimed 8 enemy aircraft destroyed. SEE MAIN EDITION FOR MORE INFORMATION.

MEMORIES OF THE FEW by

This book accompanies the Artist Proof and Tribute Editions of BITTER ENGAGEMENT

At The Setting Of The Sun by Simon Atack

This exceptional painting by Simon Atack brings back to life a scene played out daily by Fighter Command squadrons throughout the defining air battles fought in the summer of 1940. Mk I Hurricanes of 249 Squadron are seen returning to North Weald after heavy action over London during the culmination of the Battle of Britain in September of that year. It is evening, and the squadron has been operational since first light. Most of the pilots have flown four missions on this day, and they will be in the air again tomorrow at dawn. And so it will go till the battle is won. In this quite beautiful painting, Simon Atack shows Tom Neil’s Hurricane in the foreground. He has suffered battle damage but, as so often with the trusty Hurricane, his steed will carry him safely home to fight again.

Into the Blue by Simon Atack

Simon Atack’s romantic study Into the Blue depicts a classic view of a Mk I Spitfire belonging to 609 Squadron, flown by Battle of Britain ace John Bisdee, high over South East England in that fateful summer of 1940. After the first fifteen months of the war this famous fighter squadron, initially made up of week-end flyers, became the first RAF squadron to claim 100 victories. Made up of pilots from so many nations, 609 Squadron was described as the most international brotherhood in arms since the Crusades. This evocative image, endorsed by Battle of Britain Spitfire pilots, pays tribute to all those who flew and fought this supreme little fighter in the hostile skies of war-torn Europe, so long ago.

TIGER! TIGER! by Nicolas Trudgian

This brand new collector edition features the infamous Tiger Tank, one of the the deadliest fighting machines ever built and the most successful tank ace of WWII, Michael Wittmann. Wittmann's Tiger advances towards Beauvais in June 1944 to intercept the advancing British 7th Armoured Division - the famous Desert Rats - during the Allied Invasion of Normandy. Awarded the Knights Cross with Swords and Oak Leaves, Michael Wittman was the most decorated tank commander of WWII but, together with his entire crew, lost his life on August 8 in the battle for Cintheaux when his Tiger received a direct hit from a rocket fired by a RAF Typhoon ground attack fighter.

COASTAL PATROL by Richard Taylor

Coastal Patrol, a new painting by the remarkably gifted young artist Richard Taylor, depicts Mk I Spitfires of 610 Squadron flying a defensive patrol low over the White Cliffs during the height of the Battle of Britain in August 1940. A superb painting that symbolises a crucial period in history.

A TIME FOR HEROES by Robert Taylor

Royal Air Force and Royal Navy fighter aircrews flew combat throughout the six long years of World War Two. At the outbreak of war in 1939 four RAF Hurricane squadrons and two equipped with Gladiators went immediately to France where in short time New Zealander "Cobber" Kain became the first Allied Ace of the war. In April 1940 Hurricanes and Gladiators saw in action in Norway, when Rhodesian Caesar Hull of 263 Squadron became the second air Ace. By the fall of France the new Spitfire joined in the great air battles over the Channel as the British Expeditionary Force evacuated Dunkirk. Bob Stanford -Tuck, Douglas Bader, Peter Townsend, Sailor Malan, and many other great Aces gained their first victories, but with German forces massing on the French coast, the invasion of Britain looked imminent. Only RAF Fighter Command stood in Hitler's way. By July, the most famous of all air battles had begun. The next three months, under glorious summer skies, saw the most decisive and continual aerial fighting in history. The British victory in the Battle of Britain was to fundamentally change the course of the war and, ultimately, the course of history. But there were four and a half more years of air battles still to be fought and won -from the English Channel Front to the North African desert, from the Mediterranean to Far East Asia. It fell to Fleet Air Arm pilots to see the last air fighting for British and Commonwealth pilots, by then equipped with Seafires and American Corsairs and Hellcats, as they took part in the final assaults on the Japanese mainland. As the last embers of hostilities faded into history the centuries old doctrine of maritime supremacy had gone. Now the aircraft ruled. In his masterful painting A Time For Heroes Robert Taylor pays tribute to the World War II fighter aircrews of the RAF and Fleet Air Arm. A panoramic scene from the era of the Battle of Britain shows Mk I Spitfires of 234 Squadron, 10 Group's top scoring squadron, returning to St. Eval after intercepting heavy raids on south coast ports during the heaviest fighting, in September 1940. St. Michael's Mount, the castle built on the site of a 14th Century monastery to defend Britain's shores from earlier enemies, provides a symbolic backdrop as once again a band of brothers is called upon to defend their Sceptred Isle.

TOMMY LEADER Hardback Book by Robert Taylor

This outstanding new first edition hardback book is the story of Tom Dalton-Morgan, a man determined to fly and who achieved his ambition by being accepted for pilot training by the RAF in 1934. He flew in the Battle of Britain and was one of the few fighter pilots to shoot down Luftwaffe bombers at night in a single engine day fighter. He subsequently flew many operations over occupied Europe and was awarded nine British and foreign decorations. Tom sadly passed away on 18 September 2004, leaving behind the manuscript for this fascinating autobiography. At his expressed request it has now been published by Griffon International and released by the Military Gallery.

FIGHTING RED TAILS by Robert Taylor

With their distinctive red tails, P-51 Mustangs of the 332nd Fighter Group – the famed Tuskegee Airmen, climb to operational height as B17 Fortresses from the 483rd Bomb Group manoeuvre into formation at the start of another long and dangerous mission over Germany, Oct 1944. A welcome sight for the Fortress crews, the renowned all-black Tuskegee pilots were credited for never losing an escorted bomber to enemy aircraft. For the first time ever Robert pays tribute to the Tuskegee Fighter Pilots in this stunning portrait of one of the most famous fighter units of WWII.

Matted Hartmann signature by

COLLECTORS PORTFOLIO EVERY Sting of the Black Tulip Giclée Studio Proof will be issued with as a superb collectors portfolio wich comprises a facsimile wartime photograph of Major ERICH HARTMANN, beautifully matted to conservation standards to include a reproduction Luftwaffe Fighter Pilot’s clasp and Galland’s ORIGINAL signature.

Matted Galland signature by

COLLECTORS PORTFOLIO EVERY Channel Dash Giclée Studio Proof will be issued with as a superb collectors portfolio wich comprises a facsimile wartime photograph of General ADOLF GALLAND, beautifully matted to conservation standards to include a reproduction Luftwaffe Fighter Pilot’s clasp and Galland’s ORIGINAL signature

THE DAY NOW DAWNS by Robert Taylor

This the companion print to INTO THE TEETH OF THE WIND Commemorative proof. Not available individually

TYPHOON SCRAMBLE by Richard Taylor

INTRODUCING THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF LIMITED EDITIONS FROM A HUGELY TALENTED NEW ARTIST - RICHARD TAYLOR.

JG-52 PENCIL - THE EAGLES EDITION by Robert Taylor

This SIX signature edition of JG-52 is expertly conservation matted to include museum-quality reproduction Luftwaffe fighter pilot’s wings.

JG-52 PENCIL - THE LUFTWAFFE TRIBUTE PROOFS by Robert Taylor

With all the components of the Eagles Edition, the TEN signature Tribute Proofs are conservation matted and embellished by a replica Knight’s Cross ribbon

ABBEVILLE BOYS by Robert Taylor


Colditz - Under new Management by Nicolas Trudgian

Colditz – a forbidding medieval castle near Leiptzig, Germany - remains one of the most potent symbols of the Second World War. Reputed to be the Nazis most escape proof prison, this grim castle is the most notorious PoW camp in history with the distinction of being the only German prison that had more guards than prisoners. The castle was specifically used to impound incorrigible, Allied officers who had repeatedly escaped from other camps but putting so many experienced serial escapers in one place proved to be a rather questionable idea. Despite more conventional escape routes gradually being sealed off by the Germans, members of "The Colditz Escape Academy" continued to jump, tunnel and sneak out of this ‘inescapable’ prison in surprising numbers. Early in the war Hermann Goering made a public declaration that Colditz was ‘escape proof’ but he was to be proven wrong time and time again, and over 300 attempts were made during the course of the war, with more than 130 prisoners escaping and 31 successfully reaching home. When captured the result was three weeks in the solitary confinement block, however this didn’t stop prisoners inventing even more elaborate means of escaping, even catapulting themselves out of high windows and of course the famous design and building of a sophisticated glider. This new edition, reproduced from a pencil drawing by Nicolas Trudgian, depicts the imposing castle shortly after being liberated by American troops in April 1945. In the foreground below a Sherman Tank of the 9th Armored Division stands on watch, close to the sign that was erected by the US 69th Infantry Division.

OUTRUN THE THUNDER by John D. Shaw

The amazing SR-71, number 972, at Kadena as it undergoes a last-minute engine run-up prior to a reconnaissance sortie over the Soviet naval base at Vladivostok.

THE MAGNIFICENT FIGHT by John D. Shaw

In December 1941 Wake Island was defended by a handful of brave Americans against terrible odds. Isolated and alone against the might of the Imperial Japanese Navy, this intrepid group held their own on land and in the air for many weeks.

THEY FOUGHT WITH WHAT THEY HAD by John D. Shaw

In late November 1941, Clark Field, Philippine Islands the insufficiently-equipped crews of the 19th Bomb Group prepare their B-17s for the day’s practice missions.

SEMPER FI SKIES by John D. Shaw

Captain Archie Glenn Donahue of VMF-112’s “Wolfpack”, becomes an ace in a day in the skies near Guadalcanal in May 1943. He would repeat this remarkable feat 2 years later, after shooting down five enemy planes while on service aboard the USS Bunker Hill, establishing himself as one of the finest Aces in US marine aviation history. With the debut of the effectively lethal F4U Corsair, Marine and Navy pilots would soon gain and maintain air superiority throughout the Solomon Islands region during the war in the Pacific.

IWO JIMA: A HARD WON HAVEN by John D. Shaw

A burning B29 makes an emergency landing on Iwo Jima in early 1945. Thousands of US Marines had given their lives capturing this tiny volcanic island, but their heroic sacrifice saved the lives of nearly 25,000 US airmen who were able to make emergency landings there.

The Great Escape - Matted Trib by Richard Taylor

The matted Tribute Edition of the Great Escape.

THUNDERBOLTS AND LIGHTNINGS by Nicolas Trudgian

The relief of Bastogne turned the tide in the Battle of the Bulge and Hitler’s final great offensive of World War II lay in ruins. P47 Thunderbolts of the 406th Fighter Group, in company with P38 Lightning’s, support the advancing armor of General George Patton’s US Third Army as they prepare to relieve the battered 101st Airborne Division from their heroic defence of Bastogne during the final climax to the Battle of the Bulge, 24 December 1944. The Battle of the Bulge was one of the largest land battles of WWII with more than a million American, British and German troops involved, incurring huge casualties on all sides and this release pays tribute to the sacrifice of Allied Forces, during this important milestone in World War II.

DAMBUSTERS - THE IMPOSSIBLE MISSION by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor has painted an aviation masterpiece which captures the very essence of the Dams raids carried out more than 60 years ago: “Dinghy” Young, flying Lancaster AJ-A, heading through flak and machine gun fire towards the Möhne Dam at precisely 60ft, has just released his cylindrical, hydrostatically-triggered bouncing bomb – clearly visible against the huge splash created as it hits the water. The mighty Möhne Dam has but moments to live.

DEBDEN EAGLES by John D. Shaw

Based at RAF Debden in England under Blakeslee’s leadership the unit, originally comprising of RAF Eagle Squadron pilots, would produce some of the War’s greatest aces. By the end of WWII Blakeslee had flown more combat hours than any US pilot and inspired his group to destroy over 1,000 enemy aircraft.

Sir WINSTON CHURCHILL Bronze Collection by Peter Close

Born in 1874, Winston Churchill became first an army officer, then a war correspondent covering the Boer War, before entering politics as an MP in 1900. After holding the posts of Home Secretary and First Lord of the Admiralty, he served on the Western front in WWI. On 10 May 1940, King George VI appointed Churchill Prime Minister following Chamberlain’s resignation. A brilliant orator, his stirring and inspirational speeches in the dark days of 1940 and 1941 became a source of strength, not only to his country, but to the whole of the free world, as Britain stood alone against Nazi Germany.

JAMES H. DOOLITTLE Bronze Collection by Peter Close

General ‘Jimmy’ Doolittle’s lifetime spanned the entire era of aviation from the Wright Brothers’ first flight, to astronauts landings on the moon. An Army Air Service pilot at 17, he took to dare-devil stunt-flying, air racing, and record breaking. With a Doctorate in aeronautical sciences, he helped pioneer instrument flying, and the development of high-octane aviation fuel. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, he masterminded and led the historic attack on Tokyo, for which he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. Promoted to General, he commanded the air war over Italy and North Africa, later taking command of the entire US Eighth Air Force in Europe. In a lifetime packed with adventure, ‘Jimmy’ Doolittle was truly one of the 20th Century’s great heroes.

Mission by Moonlight by Gerald Coulson

To commemorate this much-loved and incomparable aircraft, Gerald Coulson’s evocative painting depicts a Mosquito B Mk. XVI, a high altitude bomber version, on operations deep over occupied Europe. In this guise the Mosquito was by far the fastest piston-engine bomber of World War II, and also the only light bomber capable of delivering the devastating 4,000lb ‘block-buster’ bomb.

Moonlight by Gerald Coulson

Flying secret agents in and out of occupied France, transporting arms and radio equipment to the Resistance, and collecting downed airmen from behind enemy lines, was one of the most hazardous flying operations of World War II. These cloak and dagger sorties, always conducted at night by the light of the moon, required a cool head and inordinate flying and navigational skills – a duty performed courageously by the pilots of RAF Special Duty Squadrons. Due to their clandestine nature, the true magnitude of their operations only became fully appreciated when the war was over.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUES by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s superb pencil Double Remarques have, in the short period of time that he has been published by the Military Gallery, evolved into highly skilled pieces of original art. Extremely detailed, these beautiful hand-crafted drawings are becoming so appreciated by collectors, that they are increasingly in high demand.

SPITFIRES OVER ST MICHAEL’S MOUNT by Robert Taylor

Robert has chosen to show a Spitfire in the Battle of Britain colours of No 41 Squadron for his romantic portrayal of a Spitfire over St Michael’s Mount, just off the coast of Cornwall – where the southwest corner of the British Isles meets the mighty Atlantic. This famous and historic landmark dating back to the Iron Age is steeped in folklore and legend.The castle of St Michael’s Mount, perched atop a great granite rock that rises majestically out of the sea in Mount’s Bay, for centuries made a tempting site for fighting forces. Here Robert cleverly uses this historic fort to provide a symbolic backdrop to a wonderful study of one of the most beautiful aircraft ever built.

HEAVEN CAN WAIT by Nicolas Trudgian

B-17 Fortresses of the “Bloody Hundredth”- the Eighth Air Force’s 100th Bomb Group - return to Thorpe Abbotts following a raid on enemy oil refineries, September 11, 1944 Nicolas Trudgian’s moving tribute to the Bloody Hundredth shows the imaginatively named B-17, Heaven Can Wait, on final approach to Thorpe Abbotts after the intense battle on September 11, 1944. Skilfully piloted by Harry Hempy, the seriously damaged B-17G has struggled 500 miles home on two engines to make it back to England. They lost their tail gunner that fateful day. Below the descending bomber stream, an agricultural traction engine peacefully ploughs the wheat stubble in preparation for next year’s vital crop, the farm workers oblivious to the unimaginable traumas sorecently experienced by the crews of the returning B-17 Fortresses.

WELCOME RESPITE by Nicolas Trudgian

Wherever the GI’s went they took their Jeeps with them, and before the war was run the little quarter-ton, 4-wheel drive, utility vehicle was as well known around the world as the Model T Ford. Nicolas Trudgian has painted a compelling new image, set back in time when the little Jeep was omnipresent on and around the roads and battlefields of a war-torn world. It is Christmas 1944 and, as a gaggle of 339th FG P-51 Mustangs disturb the peace of this ancient English village, a little Jeep waits patiently outside the pub while her occupants sample the local ale. A wonderfully nostalgic painting that will bring back pleasant memories to many.

THE HARD WAY HOME - TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor


Winter Homecoming by Robert Taylor

Companion to Escort for the Straggler

Operation Mercury by Nicolas Trudgian

Slow, frail, out-dated and hopelessly outnumbered, Gladiator biplanes of 112 Squadron RAF tenaciously throw themselves into the fray, attacking Luftwaffe fighter-bombers in the battle for Crete, in April 1941. This newly released painting shows Me110C’s of II./ZG76, having attacked naval units off the coast of Crete in early May 1941, being bravely intercepted by two Gladiators of 112 Squadron. Heavily outnumbered, the best the RAF pilots can hope for is to disrupt the Luftwaffe formation. And this they continued to do until, literally, they had no more aircraft left!

SAVAGE SKIES by Robert Taylor

The weather on the morning of 31 December, 1944 was already unpleasant. In the Ardennes, hard-pressed German troops were battling Allied ground forces advancing through several inches of snow. Above, darkening skies heralded the arrival of more snow.

At 10.45am, in deteriorating weather, a battle formation of 30 Fw190D fighters climbed out of Varrelbusch and headed south over the snowcovered landscape. Under the command of 12./JG54 Staffelkapitan, Oblt. Hans Dortenmann, and initially tasked to provide air cover to their beleaguered comrades below, the group was re-assigned to intercept enemy aircraft in the region of Limburg almost immediately the pilots were airborne. Flying south they ran directly into the oncoming weather, and with visibility dangerously reduced, Dortenmann elected to climb through the solid cloud into clear air.

As the Fw190s broke cloud above the area of Koblenz they sighted a formation of nine 2nd Air Division B-24 Liberators and formed up for an attack. Some 6000 feet above, top-cover P-51 Mustangs had watched the Fw190s climbing through the banks of clouds, and turned 180 degrees to position behind the Luftwaffe fighters. Diving in from their height advantage, the Mustang pilots entered the fray and within seconds the sky was filled with swirling dogfights.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

Pacific Glory by Nicolas Trudgian

THE THIRD AND FINAL RELEASE IN THE 60th ANNIVERSARY WWII TRILOGY PART THREE THE USAAF IN THE PACIFIC 1942 -- 1945 One of the most successful of the P-38 equipped units was the 475th Fighter Group, ‘Satan’s Angels’, and it is the P-38s of this famous unit that Nicolas Trudgian has portrayed in his tribute to the American Air Forces that made Victory in the Pacific possible. It is March 1945 and the P-38s of the 475th FG are involved in a huge dogfight with Japanese Zeros over the coast of Indo-China. Flying “Pee Wee V” is Lt Ken Hart of the 431st Fighter Squadron, who has fatally damaged a Zero in a blistering head on encounter. The second P-38 – “Vickie” – belongs to Captain John ‘Rabbit’ Pietz, who would end the War an Ace with six victories.

FIRST LIGHT by Gerald Coulson

In Gerald Coulson’s fine study First Light, Mk Vb Spitfires of 92 Squadron climb out of Biggin Hill at the outset of an early morning patrol on a cold winter’s morning in February 1941. Leaving the mist behind as the first beams of light streak across the heavens, they will turn to the east and steel themselves to meet the enemy, high in the dawn sky.

Rhapsody in Blue by Gerald Coulson

THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SPITFIRE 1936-2006. Gerald's majestic study of Spitfire prototype K5054, resplendent in its new all-blue paint scheme, is seen banking high above the clouds during an early test flight in March 1936. Gerald Coulson’s majestic study of Spitfire prototype K5054, resplendent in its new all-blue paint scheme, is seen banking high above the clouds during an early test flight in March 1936. Issued as a very exclusive limited edition of just 70 prints to commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the Spitfire, each copy of Rhapsody in Blue is accompanied by a superb matching numbered companion print MITCHELL'S MASTERPIECE

MITCHELL'S MASTERPIECE by Gerald Coulson

The Rolls Royce Merlin ‘C’ Engine of Spitfire prototype K5054 is put through its paces in-between early test flights at Eastleigh Aerodrome, in March 1936. This is the companion print to RHAPSODY IN BLUE

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richards remarques are extremely popular and already his first few releases are close to being sold out. His use of the pencil is quite superb and since being launched as a professional artist he has developed this to such a level that he is able to create remarques that are masterpieces in their own right. They are quite simply amongst the best to be found anywhere in the industry.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUES by Richard Taylor

Richards remarques are extremely popular and already his first few releases are close to being sold out. His use of the pencil is quite superb and since being launched as a professional artist he has developed this to such a level that he is able to create remarques that are masterpieces in their own right. They are quite simply amongst the best to be found anywhere in the industry.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUES by Richard Taylor

Richards remarques are extremely popular and already his first few releases are close to being sold out. His use of the pencil is quite superb and since being launched as a professional artist he has developed this to such a level that he is able to create remarques that are masterpieces in their own right. They are quite simply amongst the best to be found anywhere in the industry.

Leading the Way by Gerald Coulson

A Halifax Bomber of the Pathfinders leads the main force over occupied Europe on moonlit night in 1943

EASY COMPANY by James Dietz

The men of Easy Company, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, prepare to leave Upottery Airfield on board the C-47s that will carry them into France on the night of D-Day, 5/6 June 1944. Specially commissioned by the Military Gallery, working in close liaison with James Dietz, one of America's foremost artists, this highly restricted print edition is issued with a genuine US military issue combat helmet, from which we have created a museum quality collectors piece in Easy Company markings. Each helmet is beautifully displayed in specially created presentation box.

Easy Company Combat Helmet by

This superb Combat Helmet accompanies the print Easy Company by James Dietz as part of the Easy Company Special Collection.

THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s magnificent painting shows Victory breaking through the enemy line at 1.00pm 21st October 1805. A broadside has crippled Admiral Villeneuve’s French flagship Bucentaure, seen off Victory’s port side, while Nelsons gunners fire a second broadside into the Santisima Trinidad. Just astern, the Temeraire manoeuvres to trap the Redoubtable between herself and Victory, and thus seal her fate.

THE COMMEMORATIVE CARD COLLECTION by

Announcing a range of commemorative greetings cards using classic images from the archives of the Military Gallery. Each superb quality greetings card is left blank inside for personal messages and is supplied in clear plastic wrap with envelope.

HURRICANE COUNTRY by Nicolas Trudgian

Released on the 65th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain a new limited edition to commemorate Churchills famous "few" Stalwart of the Battle of Britain, the Hawker Hurricane equipped the majority of the RAF squadrons that defended Britain during that epic and decisive air battle in the summer of 1940. At the forefront of the air fighting over the southern counties of England, the young Hurricane pilots of 501 Squadron covered themselves in glory.Nicolas Trudgian’s new painting sets the scene: a victim of yesterday’s aerial conflicts, a crashlanded German Ju88 of KG30 lies on the edge of a Sussex field; the attention of two members of the local Home Guard is drawn to the Hurricanes of 501 Squadron as the fighters race back at low-level to Gravesend for fuel and ammunition. Within minutes they will scramble aloft again to rejoin the fray.

Merlins Over Malta by Gerald Coulson

Between June 1940 and December 1942 Malta was one of the most heavily bombed countries on earth. The battle for the island became a decisive turning point of WWII

AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS VOLUME V by Robert Taylor

Two "FIRST EDITION" limited editions of Robert Taylor's new Volume V book of aviation paintings are issued simultaneously, each comprising just 600 copies. Each UK collector edition comes with a matching numbered print called TOP COVER signed by two leading RAF fighter and bomber pilots. The American collector editions issued with a matching numbered copy of Robert Taylor's specially commissioned print LITTLE FRIENDS signed by two distinguished American fighter and bomber aircrew

CLOSE CALL by Robert Taylor

A Spitfire of 610 Squadron narrowly misses colliding with an Me109 while in close combat, low over the South of England, during the late summer of 1940. Exclusively limited to just 350 copies worldwide, this superb print has been faithfully reproduced from an original pencil drawing by Robert Taylor

STRIKE AND STRIKE AGAIN by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s gripping new painting conveys the awesome task faced by the Australian, British, Canadian, and New Zealand aircrews, as Beaufighters of No 455 Squadron RAAF from the Dallachy Strike Wing skim the rugged rock face, exiting the target after a successful rocket attack on shipping deep in a Norwegian fjord.

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VICTORY OVER THE RHINE by Nicolas Trudgian

Ill-advisedly employed by Hitler as the wonder-bomber, the Me262 was initially issued to Bomber Units, one of which being KG51. Tasked with undertaking lightning fast raids upon advancing Allied ground forces, the shark-like jets employed their spectacular speed advantage to surprise, strike and escape. Not to be outdone, the RAF responded with their supremely fast Spitfire XIVs which had already proven themselves highly effective against Germany’s V1 flying bombs. In his new painting, Nick Trudgian recreates a typical moment: Spitfire Mk XIVs of 41 Squadron have intercepted and damaged a Me262 of KG51 and, with smoke and debris pouring from its damaged Jumo 004 Turbojet, the stricken Luftwaffe jet will be lucky to make it home. A dramatic painting and a fine tribute to the RAF’s contribution to the Victory in Europe.

SUMMER HARVEST by Gerald Coulson

With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 “Dambusters” Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulson’s new painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey.

SPEEDBIRD by Simon Atack

A new limited edition to commemorate a magnificent era in aviation history, and to perpetuate the memory of one of the finest aircraft ever built. Simon's outstanding painting shows Concorde G-BOAF, the last production Concorde built and last to fly, climbing into the moonlit sky and leaving the Cornish coastline behind her.

AMERICAN EAGLES by Robert Taylor

One of World War Two’s best known P-51 Mustangs, Glamorous Glen III, flown by one of the aviation’s best known pilots, Chuck Yeager, together with pilots of the 357th Fighter Group head out of Leiston in Suffolk, on escort duty to an 8th Air Force bombing mission to Germany, October 1944.

AIR ARMADA - Tribute Edition drawing by Robert Taylor

This drawing accompanies the Tribute Edition of Air Armada. Not available individually

BATTLESHIP BISMARCK by Simon Atack

Simon Atack depicts the magnificent German battleship Bismarck at the outset of her final voyage, just five days before her fateful encounter with the British Home Fleet in the north Atlantic, May 1941.

Mustangs over the Eagles Nest by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's fine new painting shows P-51D's of the 339th Fighter Group roaring over the rooftop of Hitler's now abandoned folly. With Germany and the Third Reich on the brink of defeat, this majestic aviation image conveys the poignant irony of the greatest lost cause in human history, with P-51 Mustangs providing a fitting symbol of victory over tyranny.

EVENING REFLECTION - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

These magnificent Luftwaffe Proofs are issued with a unique and substantial original pencil drawing which is personally autographed by legendary Battle of Britain Ace General Gunther Rall.

Air Superiority by Robert Taylor

The first in a new collection of limited editions commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the conclusion of World War II. In April 1945, with the War virtually over, P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group sweep unopposed at low level through the beautiful Rhine valley. This is the first release in a pair of prints paying tribute the USAAF in Europe 1942 - 1945 and once again Robert Taylor has produced a classic painting reminiscent of some of his most collectable releases. The edition is personally signed by up to TWELVE Fighter Aces and pilots all of whom flew in Europe with the 357th Fighter Group.

RIDE OF THE VALKYRIES by Simon Atack

Simon Atack’s dramatic new painting depicts an outbound seek-and destroy mission flown by a ten-ship Huey formation of the 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Air Cavalry Division. With Rotors beating through the moist air the Regiment swoop low over the monastry at An Khe during the monsoon season, almost immediately after the unit first arrived in South Vietnam.

Robert Taylor signing canvas giclee by


KURSK - CLASH OF STEEL by Nicolas Trudgian

In July 1943 two huge armies clashed on the rolling steppes around the town of Kursk, 300 miles south of Moscow. The Germans had launched Operation Citadel to try and regain the initiative on the Eastern Front. It was to be an encounter of epic proportions - the largest tank battle in history.

ASSAULT ON THE CAPITAL by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's final painting in his 60th Anniversary trilogy features a scene from the attacks on the afternoon of September 7, 1940. Led by Herbert Ihlefeld, Me109E's of II/JG2 dive through the bomber formation giving chase to Hurricanes of 242 Squadron as Ju88s of KG30, having unloaded their bombs, head for home. One Ju88 has been hit and is already losing height, and will not return. Following behind He111s of KG53 try to keep formation as they fly through flak. The sky is alive with action.

MORNING CHORUS by Gerald Coulson

The roar of Daimler-Benz engines at full power awakens the day as Gunther Lutzow, his aircraft still in the markings of his previous unit JG51, leads his Me109F’s of JG3 into combat from a snow covered airfield at Schatalowka on the Russian Front, in December 1941. With prints signed by no less than four veteran Me109 pilots who fought on the cruel Eastern Front, this is sure to be a valuable addition to any aviation art collection.

BKV by Robert Taylor


BKVUSA by Robert Taylor


BKVTC by Robert Taylor


BKVLF by Robert Taylor


LATE ARRIVAL by Robert Taylor

This superb pencil print from the worlds most collected Aviation Artist depicts a lone Hurricane of 87 Squadron making its way back to base at Exeter, after a gruelling day of combat in the late August of 1940.

Skipper Comes Home by Robert Taylor

A brand new, superb quality, highly restricted limited edition from the studio of the world’s pre-eminent aviation artist, having prints endorsed with the original signatures of distinguished veterans that flew the mighty B-17 Fortress in the war-torn skies of Europe during the greatest air war ever fought. Robert portrays ‘Skipper’, one of the longest serving B-17 Fortresses of the war, returning to Thurleigh on a cold afternoon in late January 1945. Flying with the 367th Squadron of the 306th Bomb Group, ‘Skipper’ was badly damaged in November 1944, repaired and returned to service to finish the war with over 100 combat missions flown. Depicted here, the bare metal replacement section in the tail, and several flak patches, have yet to be repainted by her busy ground crew. With the aid of Robert Taylor’s sensitive representation, it is not difficult to imagine the thoughts and feelings of the returning aircrew as they see the runway at Thurleigh stretched out before them, welcoming them home as they make their final approach. An outstanding and invaluable addition to the portfolios of all discerning aviation art collectors.

Knights Charge by Simon Atack

Simon Atack’s spectacular new painting brings this outstanding jet aircraft to life in a dramatic recreation of an event that took place on 14 May, 1965. Flying ground attacks, F-100D Super Sabres of the 416th Squadron of the 31st Tactical Fighter Wing - the ‘Silver Knights’ based at Da Nang - execute an attack on communist NVA guerrilla forces in the Bac Lieu region of South Vietnam.

Wild Horses by Gerald Coulson

In a majestic new painting combining his love of landscape with aviation, Gerald Coulson depicts Bud Anderson and Chuck Yeager racing their Mustangs at low level through an Alpine landscape, oblivious to the record-breaking air battle involving the rest of the 357th pilots.

RUNNING THE GAUNTLET by Robert Taylor

Running the Gauntlet, a superb painting by Robert Taylor, shows Me262s of JV44 returning to base in southern Germany, having come under attack from P-51 Mustangs of the 353rd Fighter Group. Almost out of fuel and ammunition, the Me262s have little option but to complete their landing sequence, hoping fervently they are not “bounced” by American fighters loitering in the area. They are out of luck on this occasion, and although Galland has organised a unit flying Focke-Wulf Fw190D-9s to provide air cover in the area of the airfield, they too have been caught by the 353rd Fighter Group’s surprise attack. At the relatively slow speed required on final approach, the Me262’s handling is sluggish and the pilot is having enough trouble without the attentions of a bunch of P-51 pilots. At this point the JV44 Me262 remains unscathed, and with the arrival of the Fw190s, there is the possibility this particular jet pilot will survive the day.

After The Storm by Robert Taylor

High over the Pas De Calais, Douglas Bader pilots his lone Spitfire during the sudden calm immediately after an intense dogfight.

THE BLACK SHEEP by Nicolas Trudgian

A new limited edition featuring the Marine Corsairs of VMF-214 – the legendary ‘Black Sheep’ Squadron. - OUTNUMBERED BUT NEVER OUTFOUGHT - Nicolas Trudgian’s outstanding new painting captures the scene at Vella Lavella as Pappy Boyington leads his VMF-214 ‘Black Sheep’ Squadron off the island strip to escort a B-17 Fortress raid on Rabaul in December 1943.

GUNTHER RALL SIGNING DAWN EAGLES RISING by


Winter of 41 by Nicolas Trudgian

With the Battle of Britain won, and the first chinks in Goering's armour exposed, RAF Fighter Command is at last able to carry the war to the enemy. It is the bittersweet winter of '41'. Mk Vb Spitfires, having taken off as the first streaks of dawn spread across the morning sky, return to a snow-covered airfield after a dawn patrol over the Channel. Inhabitants of the sleepy English village begin to stir with the familiar sound of Merlin engines, counting each and every one of their fighter boys home.

A BOLT FOR THE BLUE by Gerald Coulson

Gerald Coulson’s dramatic painting Bolt for the Blue, published to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the first flight of the Lightning, captures the very essence of this formidable fighter. Seen climbing out of RAF Wattisham, a Lightning F.3 of Treble One Squadron scrambles to intercept an unidentified intruder plotted on the RAF’s early warning radar. Almost certainly it will be Russian, probably he will be escorted out of harms way, but the interceptor is armed with a pair of air-to-air missiles just in case. A superb collector print for all who remember one of the greatest British fighters ever built.

Operation Calendar by Simon Atack

The USS Wasp launches Spitfires of 601 and 603 Squadrons towards Malta in a desperate, but successful, attempt to defend the beleagurered island, April 1942

STORM CHASERS by Nicolas Trudgian

A stunning new limited edition by Nicolas Trudgian featuring the Focke-Wulf Fw190s of I. /JGI during the Luftwaffe’s struggle against the large-scale American daylight raids, February 1944.

NORMANDY BREAKOUT by Nicolas Trudgian

Spitfires of No. 132 Squadron rush towards the Front to give ground support to the advancing Allied forces following breakout from the Normandy beaches, June 1944

The Battle for Britain by Robert Taylor

A Battle of Britain Spitfire from 610 Squadron takes on a Me109 from I./JG3 in a head-on attack high over the south coast port of Dover, in the late morning of 10 July 1940.

NORMANDY SUNRISE by Gerald Coulson

Here, in the brightening morning sky, Typhoons are prepared for the first sortie of the day. One has already fired up its big, powerful engine, blowing up whirlwinds of Normandy dust; ground crew hover, ready to remove chocks prior to taxi and take-off. A second is readied, while the remainder of the squadron, widely dispersed around the temporary field, are about to set about their deadly missions of the day.

D-DAY ARMADA by Nicolas Trudgian

The first print in a pair of specially commissioned limited editions by Nicolas Trudgian to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Normandy Invasion, June, 1944

Knights Move by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s new painting KNIGHTS MOVE shows the awesome battleship Tirpitz under the command of Admiral Schniewind, in company with battleships Scheer and Hipper, setting sail during “Operation Rosselsprung”, destined for the open sea and the North Atlantic convoy traffic. Messerschmitt Me109s of JG5, based at Petsamo, provide overhead cover while flotilla escort vessels make up the fearsome armada. The magnificent Norwegian mountains provide a spectacular backdrop this comprehensively realistic and stirring World War Two image.

Target Bearing 270 by Robert Taylor

At sunrise on 12 November, 1944, led by Wing Commander James Tait, Lancasters of 617 Squadron RAF prepare to make their bombing run on the German battleship Tirpitz, lying in the Norwegian fjord at Tromsø.

PHANTOM RAIDERS by Simon Atack

Simon Atack’s powerful new limited edition depicting the high-speed, low-level attack by F4 Phantoms of the 435th Tactical Fighter Squadron on the bridge near Viet Tri, 24 May 1967

DOOLITTLE'S D-DAY by Robert Taylor

Flying his P-38 Lightning over the battlefront during the early moments of the Normandy landings, Jimmy Doolittle provided General Eisenhower with the first eyewitness report of the D-Day invasion.

MESSERSCHMITT COUNTRY by Nicolas Trudgian

A spectacular new painting paying tribute to the courage and resolve of the Luftwaffe fighter pilots of World War Two, all of whom flew combat without respite, some surviving more than five years of continual air fighting to record thousands of combat missions.

Showtime 100 by Philip West

Phantom / MIG

THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN MATTED DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor is widely recognised as one of the best exponents of pencil work in the aviation art industry and a very limited number of both RED TAIL PATROL and THE TUSKEGEE AIRMEN will be issued with an individually hand drawn single or DOUBLE sized original pencil remarque, direct from Richard’s studio. Each exquisite remarque will be completed as an individual pencil drawing and numbered to match the main print. Both are then issued within full conservation matting to include a pair of museum quality reproduction US Air Force Pilots Wings, creating a highly desirable tribute to the FIGHTING RED TAILS!

TOP COVER by Gerald Coulson

Big Brothers and Little Friends – the enduring bond between the bomber crews and fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force in their prolonged and hotly contested air war against Hitler’s Nazi Germany, 1942-1945

Chippy Ho by Philip West

F-18 Hornet

Eagle Intercept by Philip West

F-15 / Tu-95 Bear

Habu 972 at Mach 3.0 by Philip West

SR-71 Habu

Lone Star Lady by Philip West

B52

Return of the Bounty Hunters by Philip West

F-14 Tomcats

Screaming Eagle by Philip West

F-4 Phantom

SWORDFISH ATTACK AT TARANTO by Robert Taylor

On November 11, 1940 a group of 21 slow, outdated Swordfish biplanes attacked and crippled the Italian Fleet in the heavily defended port of Taranto. One of the most daring raids of World War II captured in this print for posterity.

Teamwork by Nicolas Trudgian

P-51 Mustangs of the 20th Fighter Group make a low pass over B-17s of the 401st Bomb Group at Deenethorpe, as they return to their base at Kingscliffe in late 1944.

MUSTANG - P51 by Robert Taylor

Russ Berg flies his 10th Recce Group P51s in low and fast, dodging flak and enemy fighters, to get vital photographs for General Paton's advancing forces. A superb study of World War II's most outstanding tactical fighter in action, in the hands of one of the USAAF's most distinguished and highly decorated pilots.

A Lincolnshire Sunset 1944 by Gerald Coulson

On a clear night in 1944, as the sun is setting over their Lincolnshire airfield, the men of 617 squadron prepare their Lancaster bombers in readiness for the long night ahead.

Alone at Dawn by Gerald Coulson

Heavily damaged by flak and with one engine out, a Lancaster slowly makes it's way home far behind the main force.

Country Life by Gerald Coulson

A pair of Mosquito B MkIVs, over East Anglia, returning from a low level precision raid over occupied Europe.

First Flight by Gerald Coulson

The Hawker Hunter prototype (P1067) makes its first flight on July 21st 1951.

Home Run by Gerald Coulson

It is June 1944 and, as dawn begins to break over East Anglia, Mosquito B Mk XVI bombers of the Light Night Striking Force return from a raid over Berlin. The sun is just beginning to rise and the peaceful tranquility is shattered as these majestic aircraft power in from the North Sea, flying at low level over the Norfolk marshes.

Low Level Encounter by Gerald Coulson

A Spitfire and an Me109 locked in battle pass a downed He111 low over the English countryside.

Patrolling the Line by Gerald Coulson

Canadian Fighter Ace Major William Barker leading new recruits over enemy lines, 8 October 1917.

Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson

Pathfinder Lancasters of No 8 PFF Group land after a long night's work over Germany.

Attack on the Yalu Bridges by Philip West

F4U Corsair

STRIKE AND RETURN by Robert Taylor

"I stood on the end of the runway at RAF Binbrook during the filming of the Memphis Belle and gazed over the ageless, beautiful Lincolnshire landscape. It was easy to visualize the Lancasters of 460 Squadron returning home, battle-worn and tired as they would have done some fifty years earlier, and to imagine the emotions of the crews as they brought their mighty Lancasters back to this famous wartime base." - Robert Taylor

HELLCAT FURY by Robert Taylor

Truk, the small atoll in the South Pacific, was the major anchorage for the Japanese Fleet. Comprising a magnificent harbor and four heavily defended airfields, it was thought impregnable by the US forces as they fought their way up through the Pacific. But on 16-17 February 1944 a violent two-day aerial assault by carrierborne aircraft of Task Force 58 exploded the myth. In just two days the US Navy flyers sunk over 200,000 tons of Japanese naval shipping and destroyed an estimated 275 enemy aircraft, totally eliminating all effectiveness of the Japanese base. Light as the US Navy losses were only 25 aircraft failed to return the battle for Truk was ferocious. The ground installations, ships, and airfield batteries put up intense antiaircraft fire against the attacking American aircraft, while Zeros did their best to repel the onslaught. The air above the atoll became a maelstrom of flak, tracer, flying lead and shrapnel, while below huge explosions rocked the ground as ammo and fuel dumps were hit, fires raged, and the acrid smoke of battle pervaded the entire area. In this important new painting, his first featuring the F6F Hellcat, Robert Taylor brings to life the scenario that was crucial to Admiral Spruance’s forceful drive through the Central Pacific. The once feared Japanese base at Truk is being reduced to a statistic of war. Hellcats of VF6 hurtle across the lagoon at masthead height with guns blazing, creating havoc as they tear into the enemy positions below. Seen in the foreground is the F6F-3 of Lt. Alex Vracui, subsequently to become one of the Navy’s top guns. This exhilarating new work dramatically conveys the awesome conditions endured day after day by the pilots of the US Navy and Marine Corps in the Pacific. With prints signed by a host of US Navy Aces, including the first F6F Hellcat Ace of World War II, Robert has created a limited edition print that will take pride of place in many discerning print collections.

ACE OF DIAMONDS by Nicolas Trudgian

From the day they began their aerial campaign against Nazi Germany to the cessation of hostilities in 1945, the USAAF bomber crews plied their hazardous trade in broad daylight. This tactic may have enabled better sighting of targets, and possibly less danger of mid-air collisions, but the grievous penalty of flying daylight missions over enemy territory was the ever presence of enemy fighters. Though heavily armed, the heavy bombers of the American Eighth Air Force were no match against the fast, highly manoeuvrable Me109s, Fw190s and, late in the war, Me 262 jet fighters which the Luftwaffe sent up to intercept them. Without fighter escort they were sitting ducks, and inevitably paid a heavy price. Among others, one fighter group earned particular respect, gratitude, and praise from bomber crews for their escort tactics. The 356th FG stuck rigidly to the principle of tight bomber escort duty, their presence in tight formation with the bombers often being sufficient to deter enemy attack. Repeatedly passing up the opportunity to increase individual scores, the leadership determined it more important to bring the bombers home than claim another enemy fighter victory. As the air war progressed this philosophy brought about an unbreakable bond between heavy bomber crews and escort fighter pilots, and among those held in the highest esteem were the pilots of the 356th. Nicolas Trudgian pays tribute to the escort fighter pilots of the USAAF Eighth Air Force, and in particular to those who flew with the 356th, with his new action packed aerial panorama Ace of Diamonds. Top scoring ace Donald J Strait, flying his P-51 D Mustang Jersey Jerk, together with pilots of the 356th Fighter Group, are seen in action against Luftwaffe Fw 190s while escorting B-17 bombers returning from a raid on German installations during the late winter of 1944. His fine rendition brings home the devastating speed with which these attacks were fought: One minute all is orderly as the mighty bombers thunder their way homeward; the next minute enemy fighters are upon them and all hell breaks loose. A fine re-enactment created by a master painter, Nick’s new limited edition, signed by fighter pilots of the 356th FG, will grace the collection of the finest aviation art portfolio.

THREE HUNDRED CLUB by Nicolas Trudgian

Although the true qualities of a fighter pilot cannot be measured simply by tallying his number of air victories - some of the greatest fighter leaders do not feature in the top score sheets -there can be no question that any fighter pilot whose victory tally is counted in 100's has got to be exceptional. That two of them achieved more than 300 air-to-air victories is pure phenomena. In paying tribute to Erich Hartmann and Gerhard Barkhorn, the only two fighter pilots ever to top the 300 victory mark, Nicolas Trudgian has painted a gripping combat scene being played out in the typically harsh environment where these two remarkable fighter aces achieved immortality. Both "300 Club" members flew the majority of their combat missions with JG-52, the most successful fighter wing of WWII, where, on the Eastern Front they encountered and conquered every type of fighter including British built Spitfires and Hurricanes, the American Airacobra, and all the best Russian built fighters, including the Yak-9. Nicolas Trudgian's quite stunning rendition brings to life the harsh reality of the air war on the Eastern Front in a scene from November 1944. Heading back from the Front, a German armoured column has come under attack from Russian LA7's as it files past a frozen Lake Balaton, in Hungary. Luftwaffe fighters from JG-52 have been called in, and the Me109's of Erich Hartman and Gerhard Barkhorn are seen engaging the attacking aircraft. Typical of this popular artist's style, the picture is filled with detail authentic to the period, and with prints signed by leading fighter aces, all of whom fought alongside Hartmann and Barkhorn in JG-52, this new limited edition print provides a fitting tribute to history's two highest scoring fighter aces for enthusiasts of the era to add to their collections.

HOMEWARD BOUND by Nicolas Trudgian

No single raid during World War Two has attracted more discussion, analysis, features, books, interviews, or been the subject of more films, documentaries, and TV programmes than the famous attack mounted by the RAF’s 617 Squadron upon the mighty hydroelectric dams in Westphalia, on the night of 16/17 May, 1943. Led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, nineteen specially adapted Lancaster bombers, manned by 133 aircrew, culminated months of secret training when they made one of the most audacious raids of the war. Flying at tree-top height in darkness, and doing their best to avoid electricity pylons and other obstructions, they navigated their way deep into occupied territory. Their targets were the huge Möhne, Sorpe, Ennepe, and Eder Dams that powered Germany’s huge industrial factories in the heartland of the Rhur. Each bomber had to avoid enemy flak and fighters en route, locate their target, descend to precisely 60 feet above the water then, in the face of a barrage of anti-aircraft fire, release their single unique 10,000 lb hydrostatic bomb at exactly the right moment. There was no margin for error, and there was no place for faint hearts. Eight of the crews that left RAF Scampton that night were never to return. Of the fifty-six aircrew on board only two survived. Though nearly half the skilled crews that made up 617 squadron were lost, they recorded one of the most successful and daring air raids of the war- a costly endeavour, but one that has become legend in the annals of aerial warfare. Nicolas Trudgian’s emotive painting Homeward Bound depicts Dave Shannon’s Lancaster AJ-L, dodging the searchlights low over the Dutch landscape, as he returns from the Eder Dam following the part he and his crew played in the famous raid on that moonlight night in May, 1943.

DUEL IN THE DARK by Robert Taylor

The air war fought throughout World War II in the night skies above Europe raged six long years. RAF Hurricanes sent up to intercept the Luftwaffe's nightly blitz on British cities had no more equipment than the fighters that fought the Battle of Britain during the day, but as the scale of nightly conflict developed, detection and navigation aids - primitive by today's standards - were at the cutting edge of World War II aviation technology. As the air war progressed the intensity of the RAF's nightly raids grew to epic proportions, and the Luftwaffe night-fighters became a critical last line of defence as their cities were pounded from above. By 1944 the Luftwaffe was operating sophisticated systems coordinating radar, searchlights and flak batteries, enabling effective guidance to increasingly wily aircrews flying equipment-laden aircraft. But the RAF had in turn developed their own detection equipment, and the nightly aerial contests between fighters and bombers were desperate affairs. Night-fighter pilots were men of special calibre, requiring a blend of all the best piloting and navigational qualities combined with patience, determination, and no small element of cunning. They were hunters in the purest sense, constantly honing their skills, and pitting their wits against a formidable foe. The young aircrews of the Luftwaffe fought a brave but losing battle in defence of their homeland, but their dedication never faltered, and their bravery is legend. Robert Taylor pays tribute to this courageous and skilled group of flyers with his new painting Duel in the Dark. It is August 1944. As Lancaster heavy bombers of 106 Squadron approach the target, Major Heinz-Wolfgang Schnaufer, Kommandeur of IV./ NJG1 and the Luftwaffe's top-scoring night- fighter pilot, makes a daring attack passing feet below the mighty four-engine aircraft. Flying his Me110 night-fighter among the flak and searchlights he has scored hits on the bombers outer starboard engine. While his gunner fiercely returns fire from the bomber's front turret gunner, the night-fighter Ace will slip into the shadows before selecting another quarry. His night's work is not yet done.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the most collected artists in the industry and the demand for his original work is huge. His pencil work in particular is extremely popular and his superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

THE DAMBUSTERS - BREACHING THE MOHNE by Gerald Coulson

Mick Martin's pulls his Lancaster away from the Mőhne Dam as his 'Upkeep' bouncing bomb exploding behind him sending a huge plume of water into the air. On his starboard side Guy Gibson flies close to drawing enemy fire from the guns on the dam towers.

BACK FROM NORMANDY by Nicolas Trudgian

Like the Messerschmitt 109, its great adversary throughout almost six years of aerial combat, the Spitfire was a fighter par excellence. Good as many other types may have been, these two aircraft became symbols of the two opposing air forces they represented. Their confrontation, which began in 1940 during the Battle of Britain, continued without interruption until the last days of World War Two. From an air force teetering on extinction in the dark days of 1940, by the summer of 1944 the pilots of RAF Fighter Command had fought their way back to become top dogs. And when the invasion of northern France came, they swept over the beaches in force, cutting deep into enemy occupied territory, hammering the enemy in the air and on the ground. Key to this air superiority was the supreme performance of the Spitfire, its ability to out-fly the Luftwaffe™s best, and the leadership of the pilots who had survived the early air battles of the war. Among the best was 26 year old Pete Brothers, by 1944 a highly successful and experienced fighter pilot commanding his own Wing. Having fought through the battles of France and Britain, now with a clutch of air victories to his credit, in 1944 he took command of first the Exeter Wing, and then the Culmhead Wing, ideally placed to support the coming invasion of Normandy. Nick Trudgian™s striking new painting recreates a typical scene as Mk IX Spitfires of 126 Squadron, led by Wing Commander Pete Brothers flying his Mk VII Spitfire wearing high altitude paint scheme, race back to RAF Culmhead after a low-level attack on enemy transport in Normandy. The Culmhead Spitfire Wing flew constant armed irRhubarbld attacks in support of the invasion from D-Day Œ June 6 1944 Œ till the first improvised strips were established in France a few weeks following the invasion. This beautiful aviation print, contrasting the frenetic pace of war with a restful English coastal landscape, evokes the memory of a legendary fighter aircraft that, flown by gallant pilots, helped change the course of history. Prints are signed by Pete Brothers and two other pilots who flew Spitfires in combat during World War II.

MUSTANGS ON THE PROWL by Robert Taylor

Between 3 and 13 September 1944, the 55th Fighter Group flew eight arduous, highly successful, bomber escort missions to Germany for which the group received a Distinguished Unit Citation. Like those the group had flown before, and would fly again and again until the end of hostilities, each mission took them deep into enemy airspace, involved desperate combat with Luftwaffe fighters, and culminated in rapid descent to low level to strafe enemy airfields on the way home. In that ten day period of intense fighting the 55th covered themselves in glory, destroying large numbers of enemy fighters in the air and on the ground, one of their pilots becoming the top-scoring ground attack pilot of the campaign. Long-range combat missions were typical of the assignments flown by the fighters of the 8th Air Force during that period of the air war. Not content with dog-fighting at altitude, when escort duty was complete, the Eighth™s aggressive fighter pilots relished the opportunity to hurtle down to tree-top height and, ignoring the inevitable barrage of anti-aircraft fire, shoot up any target of opportunity upon which they could bring their guns to bear. Robert Taylor™s spectacular new limited edition print, the third in his acclaimed Collector Portfolio commemorating the great Air Commands of World War II, depicts the king of the Eighth's ground attack Aces, Colonel Elwyn Righetti. Flying his P-51D Mustang, the 55th's CO of 338 Squadron, already with 20 plus victories to his credit, leads his pilots through the Rhine Gorge, skimming the ancient Castle of Stableck standing above Bacharach, as they seek out enemy targets on their way back to base at Wormingford, England, in the spring of 1945. A classic Robert Taylor edition endorsed with the signatures of Aces who flew and fought the legendary P-51 Mustang in the greatest air war in history.

ICE WARRIORS by Nicolas Trudgian

The Green Heart Warriors carried their famous emblem throughout almost every European theatre during World War Two. Having fought with distinction in the Battle of Britain, JG54 transferred to the Eastern Front, where it was to achieve historic success. Becoming one of the most successful combat fighter wings of the war, JG54 spawned a succession of top fighter Aces, no fewer than 20 achieving more than 100 air victories, its pilots collecting an impressive 58 Knights Cross awards. Flying both Fw190s and Me109s, JG54 took part in the heavy air fighting in the northern region of the Russian Front, where conditions were not for the faint hearted and demanded exceptional piloting skills. One young Austrian pilot, Walter Nowotny, won a reputation even among Allied pilots, and during the summer of 1943 became a virtual one-man air force in the skies above the Eastern Front. In June 1943 he shot down 41 aircraft, 10 in one day. In August he collected a further 43 air victories, and another 5 the following month. In a dog-fight in October Nowotny shot down a P-40 fighter to record an astounding 250 air victories, becoming the first fighter pilot in history to achieve this score. Nicolas Trudgian's new painting magically captures the busy atmosphere of a Luftwaffe fighter station on the Russian Front in the dead of winter. It is February 1943, the countryside deep in snow, and the temperature well below freezing as Leutnant Walter Nowotny, Staffel-kapitän of 1./JG54, taxis "White One" out from a crowded dispersal on to the snow covered runway at Krasnogvardeisk. With their temporary whitewash colour scheme glinting in the early morning sunlight, the Fw 190A-4s pose a menacing spectacle as they line up to follow the fighters of 2./JG54, already airborne, into the cold morning air. With each print signed by leading Aces who flew with JG54 on the Russian Front in WWII, this spectacular print will provide a valuable addition to the most discerning of aviation art collections.

ESCORT TO THE SCHARNHORST by Simon Atack

When the German battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau entered Brest in March, 1941, between them they had sunk a total of 22 ships during their North Atlantic operations. Laying in port however, they became a target for constant air attack, Scharnhorst being damaged by bombs, and in February 1942 the decision was made to break out with the famous Channel Dash. Scharnhorst led the flotilla in a daring passage through the English Channel, heading for the sanctuary of Wilhelmshaven. They all got through but, striking two mines en-route, it was March 1943 before the Scharnhorst was able to resume battle operations when, under heavy escort, she sailed for Norway. Simon Atack's panoramic seascape depicts a scene from Operation Paderborn as Scharnhorst ploughs through a lively swell with Fw190s of I./JG5, based at Oslo Fornebu, providing fighter cover. Steaming in company with destroyers Z-28 and Erich Steinbrinck, the mighty German battleship has departed Gotenhafen and is heading towards Bogen Bay, near Narvik in Norway. But Scharnhorst's days were numbered. On 26 December 1943 the huge battleship attacked a convoy off North Cape, but in the heavy seas Scharnhorst became detached from her destroyer escort. With the British Home Fleet aware of her position, and intentions, she was intercepted, the Britishbattleship Duke of York landing a barrage of 14-inch shells on the mighty German warship. The blows were fatal, the coup-de-grace coming shortly after, when 11 torpedoes sent the magnificent but deadly battleship quickly to the bottom. There were just 36 survivors.

NIGHT ATTACK ON THE NEWCASTLE by Robert Taylor

Hit and run attacks by fast moving German E-Boats were a constant threat to vital Allied shipping in the Mediterranean during the second World War. Often made under cover of darkness, these fast, highly manoeuvrable craft would speed through a convoy, release their torpedoes, and disappear into the night. During the night of 15 June 1942 German E-Boats of the 3rd Flotilla left their Eastern Mediterranean base at Derna to intercept an Allied convoy bound for the island of Malta. Shortly after midnight, under the command of Leutnant Seigfried Wuppermann, the motor torpedo boat S-56 slipped past two Royal Navy escort destroyers to make a stern attack on the British cruiser HMS Newcastle. Alerted to the incoming attack, suddenly a searchlight at Newcastle’s foremast switched on, illuminating S-56 from stem to stern. Reacting quickly, Wuppermann fired two torpedoes in quick succession from 600 yards, and turned hard to starboard to make good his escape. A second searchlight aboard Newcastle pin-pointed S-56, but by then it was too late. Travelling at 33 knots, under fire from the escorts, S-56 threw out a smoke screen and released depth charges as a distraction, and disappeared into the darkness. Robert Taylor’s action packed painting shows S-56 some thirty seconds after release of her torpedoes, as the first explodes against the hull of HMS Newcastle. The second will strike a few seconds later. The cruiser, though badly damaged, limped back to Alexandria.

MISSION COMPLETED by Simon Smith

Day breaks at the end of a gruelling operation during the autumn of 1944. The returning crew of this Lancaster await the crew bus at their aircraft dispersal, grouped before their mighty bomber which shows fresh scars of battle from an arduous mission over occupied Europe. The exhausted men are clearly relieved and thankful to be safely home at their in Lincolnshire base.

MALTA - GEORGE CROSS by Robert Taylor

Pilot Officer John Bisley of 126 Squadron in combat with Me 109s from JG-53 during one of the intense aerial air battles over Valetta in April 1942. Between the summer of 1940 and the end of 1942, Malta became one of the most bombed places on earth. The RAF’s desperate fight to retain control of the diminutive Mediterranean island, and the defiant courage of the people of Malta, is one of the epic stories of World War Two.

WARM WINTER'S WELCOME by Nicolas Trudgian

As the Autumn of 1944 turned to winter, the USAAF Eighth Air Force bombers were penetrating ever deeper into enemy territory, attacking distant targets in central and south-east Germany. Large formations of seven or eight hundred bombers, escorted by as many fighters, darkened the skies over the Reich. Central to the massive daylight raids was the long-range capabilities of the P-51 Mustang, the most versatile fighter of the war. Despite incessant pounding from the air, the Luftwaffe were putting up determined resistance, particularly in the south, often sending up several hundred fighters to meet the challenge. Huge aerial battles were fought between the opposing groups of fighters, and though the Allied pilots usually gained the upper hand in these encounters, the air fighting was prolonged and furious. Typical of those encounters, on a single mission in November the Allied estimate of Luftwaffe sorties flown against them exceeded 750, but often the German fighters were handicapped by poor direction from the ground, hampering their effectiveness - on the 27th, several Gruppen were vectored directly towards the P-51s of the 357th and 353rd Groups believing them to be in-coming bombers. They paid the price, the Leiston based pilots of the 357th bagging 30 enemy fighters before they knew what hit them. Successful as they were, the long-range escort missions flown by the P-51s were both hazardous and gruelling. The weather, particularly in winter, was often appalling, and even an experienced pilot could become disorientated after hectic combat, and lost in the far reaches of the Reich. The return to base in England after combat over distant enemy territory was always exhilarating, and the pilots often hedgehopped gleefully over towns and villages on their way home after crossing the English coast. Nicolas Trudgian's new painting depicts such a scene, with P-51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group racing over a typical English village as they head for Leiston and home. As the evening light fades, the peace and tranquillity of the snowy village, broken momentarily by the roar of Merlin engines, seems to bid the returning fighter boys a warm winter's welcome.

FIRST OF MANY -DOUGLAS BADER TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor

We are pleased to tell you about this highly restricted, special edition of Robert Taylor’s famous painting First of Many, depicting the legendary fighter Ace’s first air victory in World War II. Each print in this special Tribute Edition is signed by four famous RAF Fighter Aces that flew Hurricanes and Spitfires with Douglas Bader in the Battle of Britain in 1940. Sadly, none of these renowned pilots are still with us today. The signatures on this significant print are among the most sought-after by knowledgeable collectors. Few such unique and valuable collector prints are ever offered on the primary market these days, especially when signed by such prominent fighter Aces who excelled in combat in that momentous and decisive period in aviation history. We expect the prints to be quickly snapped up by collectors, so please order your copy without delay, before we become over-subscribed.

THUNDERHEADS OVER RIDGEWELL by Robert Taylor

In the early days of the USAAF daylight bombing campaign, before the arrival of long-range fighter escorts, rarely was a mission flown without Luftwaffe interception and the ever-present barrage of anti-aircraft fire. The Eighth Air Force crews literally fought their way through swarms of enemy fighters and thick flak to hit their targets, then fought their way home again. Seldom a formation returned without losses and casualties, but inexorably the American bomb groups struck deeper and deeper into enemy territory. Bomber crews lucky enough to survive a complete tour were few and far between. They knew this when they arrived in England at the start of their tour, and the awesome task they faced banded the flyers together like brothers. They flew and fought for each other, their country and liberty with determination and a camaraderie that only those who went through the experience could fully appreciate. In his tribute to the USAAF bomber crews, Robert Taylor has selected the 381st Bomb Group to represent, and pay tribute to all those who flew the perilous daylight raids out of bases in England into the heavily defended skies above enemy occupied Europe. Robert's emotive painting shows 381st Bomb Group B-17 Fortresses returning to Ridgewell on a summer afternoon in 1944 during a period when the Group reached the peak of it effectiveness- for several months it was the top ranked outfit in the Eighth. Between June 1943 and the end of hostilities the 381st completed 297 combat missions, hit almost every important target in German hands and was credited with the destruction of 223 enemy aircraft. One aircraft, more than any other, came to symbolise the great bombing campaign of the USAAF in Europe during World War Two, and in his spectacular new painting Robert Taylor captures the magnificence of Boeing's legendary B-17 Flying Fortress. In his inimitable style the artist brings to life an exact wartime scene, a battle-damaged aircraft making apparent the fearsome task tackled daily by those who flew the hazardous missions to occupied Europe during the greatest air war ever fought.

EAGLE STRIKE by Simon Atack

Flying his Messerschmitt Me109G6, Major Günther Rall, Group Commander of II./JG11 with over 200 air victories already to his credit, clashes with a P-47 Thunderbolt of the 63rd Sqn, 56th Fighter Group high over the Rhine south of Koblenz, May 12, 1944. Led by Colonel Hub Zemke, the 56th Fighter Group played advance guard to a deep penetration bomber raid to central Germany. As his forty eight P-47 Thunderbolts arrived to sweep the sky around the Koblenz –Frankfurt area, the Me109s of II./JG11 pounced from a 5000 feet height advantage. Simon Atack’s high-impact painting shows Major Günther Rall bringing down Hub Zemke’s wingman, the first of two victories he claimed before himself being brought down by 56th Fighter Group P-47s later in the combat. Günther Rall returned to combat flying, commanding JG300 until the end of hostilities by which time, with 275 air victories, he became the third highest scoring Ace in history.

EAGLES ON THE CHANNEL FRONT by Robert Taylor

An exceptional painting by the world's foremost aviation artist remembering the most famous of all Luftwaffe Fighter Wings that fought on the Western Front during the early years of World War Two. Prints are signed by Luftwaffe Aces who contested the great air battles with pilots of the RAF on the infamous Channel Front, 1940-1941 Badly mauled during the Battle of Britain, by early 1941 the Luftwaffe fighter wings, strung right across northern France, were back on strength. The front line squadrons were reequipping with the up-rated Me109F and, though suffering initial over-heating problems, the remarkable new Fw190A was making its first appearances. The Luftwaffe pilots were again full of confidence, and having the air endurance advantage of fighting close to their bases, they were competing on equal terms with the Spitfires and Hurricanes of RAF Fighter Command. Having spent the first 18 months of the war fighting a defensive air battle, RAF Fighter Command was raring to go onto the attack. The mix of Rhubarbs - two or three-plane, low-level incursions to attack enemy bases and installations - and large fighter sweeps aimed to entice the Luftwaffe up for a fight, kept the German fighter pilots busy throughout the summer. All through 1941 great air battles raged all along the Channel Front. Robert Taylor's comprehensive new work Eagles on the Channel Front, the fourth and final print in his widely acclaimed "Wings of the Luftwaffe" series, recreates a scene in northern France in the late autumn of 1941. Having just returned to their temporary airstrip in the region of St. Omer, Luftwaffe pilots of JG-26 excitedly debrief their recent encounter with Spitfires and Hurricanes, fought high over the Channel coast. The gleaming new Me109F's are discreetly parked under trees on the edge the airfield, providing some cover from low-level surprise attacks. While ground crews busily prepare the Wing's Me109s for another mission, a group of the exciting new Fw190A fighters taxi out. The scenario will continue right into winter. In his inimitable style, and with inordinate skill, Robert Taylor manages to evoke the heady atmosphere of a German front line airfield on the Channel Front in 1941. With the entire edition signed by Luftwaffe Aces who flew the great air battles of WWII, this wonderfully atmospheric image provides aviation art connoisseurs with a truly remarkable and valuable collector print.

AIR COMBAT LEGENDS VOL II by Nicolas Trudgian

In this, Nicolas Trudgian's second published collection, over 40 paintings featuring classic combat aircraft are reproduced in full colour, supported and enhanced by wonderfully detailed pencil drawings. The artist's first hand narrative describes each painting, his research, discussions with aircrews, and how these relate to his finished canvasses. Trudgian brings a reality and authenticity to his work that has made him a favourite with the pilots and crews of the combat aircraft featured in his paintings- an accolade achieved by very few aviation artists. The foreword is by leading Battle of Britain fighter Ace, Air Commodore Pete Brothers,CBE, DSO, DFC*. Beautifully bound in hard case, with full colour dust jacket, Nick's new book provides a veritable art gallery of magical quality that will bring endless hours of pleasure for enthusiasts of classic aircraft of the past, and will serve as a tribute to the gallant pilots and crews who flew them in combat.

AIR COMBAT LEGENDS VOL II LIMITED EDITION by Nicolas Trudgian

In this, Nicolas Trudgian's second published collection, over 40 paintings featuring classic combat aircraft are reproduced in full colour, supported and enhanced by wonderfully detailed pencil drawings. The artist's first hand narrative describes each painting, his research, discussions with aircrews, and how these relate to his finished canvasses. Trudgian brings a reality and authenticity to his work that has made him a favourite with the pilots and crews of the combat aircraft featured in his paintings- an accolade achieved by very few aviation artists. The foreword is by leading Battle of Britain fighter Ace, Air Commodore Pete Brothers,CBE, DSO, DFC*. Beautifully bound in hard case, with full colour dust jacket, Nick's new book provides a veritable art gallery of magical quality that will bring endless hours of pleasure for enthusiasts of classic aircraft of the past, and will serve as a tribute to the gallant pilots and crews who flew them in combat.

AIR COMBAT LEGENDS VOL II LIMITED EDITION by Nicolas Trudgian

In this, Nicolas Trudgian's second published collection, over 40 paintings featuring classic combat aircraft are reproduced in full colour, supported and enhanced by wonderfully detailed pencil drawings. The artist's first hand narrative describes each painting, his research, discussions with aircrews, and how these relate to his finished canvasses. Trudgian brings a reality and authenticity to his work that has made him a favourite with the pilots and crews of the combat aircraft featured in his paintings- an accolade achieved by very few aviation artists. The foreword is by leading Battle of Britain fighter Ace, Air Commodore Pete Brothers,CBE, DSO, DFC*. Beautifully bound in hard case, with full colour dust jacket, Nick's new book provides a veritable art gallery of magical quality that will bring endless hours of pleasure for enthusiasts of classic aircraft of the past, and will serve as a tribute to the gallant pilots and crews who flew them in combat.

TYPHOONS OVER THE RHINE by Nicolas Trudgian

Flying low level at high speed through intense ground fire was all part of the daily task of the pilots of the Typhoon ground attack squadrons. Armed with rockets, 1000lb bombs and four 20mm cannon, this formidable fighter played a leading role in the Allied advance through occupied Europe. Leading up to, and following the Normandy landings through to the end of hostilities, the Typhoon, flown by determined hard hitting pilots, became the scourge of the German Panzer Divisions, and wrought havoc with enemy road and rail communications. Targets along the Rhine, over one of Germany's arteries of supply and communication and last line of defence, were given special attention by the Typhoon squadrons. Barges carrying vital supplies, munition trains on railroads hugging the river bank, and the ever present movement of troops and armour toward the battlefront were constantly attacked from the air, and just such a scene is vividly portrayed in Nicolas Trudgian's new painting TYPHOONS OVER THE RHINE.

BAND OF BROTHERS by Robert Taylor

The mighty Lancaster, the mainstay of RAF Bomber Command, crewed by volunteers from Britain, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Rhodesia, South Africa, and many other nations opposed to Nazi rule, flew day and night sorties whenever there was a chance of reaching the target. Their unflinching courage, and selfless devotion to duty paved the way for the D-Day invasion, and the ultimate liberation of Nazi occupied Europe. Embellished with Goering's infamous quotation "No Enemy Plane Will Fly Over The Reich Territory", S for Sugar took her bombs to Berlin, Hamburg, Schweinfurt, Bremen, Hanover, Wurzburg, Munich, Stuttgart, Frankfurt, Dusseldorf, and other prime targets, flying the second greatest number of operational sorties of any bomber in the Command. Time and again Sugar brought her crew home, often limping back riddled with flak and bullet holes, occasionally on three engines, and once all the way back from the German capital with a badly damaged wing following a mid-air collision over the target. Robert Taylor's emotive new painting shows S for Sugar on the morning of 27th April, 1944 after her 95th sortie - a raid on the ball-bearing factory at Schweinfurt. As the battle-scarred bomber taxies in at RAF Waddington, other 467 Squadron Lancasters follow, heading for their dispersal points. Already the weary crews begin their informal debriefing. By the war's end this trusty bomber had completed no fewer than 137 operations over enemy territory, bringing her crew home every time. Now magnificently restored to her former glory, S for Sugar resides in the RAF Museum at Hendon, providing a lasting tribute to the gallant men of RAF Bomber Command. ne famous aircraft was typical of, and ultimately came to symbolise, the men and machines of Royal Air Force Bomber Command. Flying initially with 83 Squadron Pathfinder Force, then 467 Squadron RAAF, Avro Lancaster serial number R5868, call sign S for Sugar, took part in almost every major attack on Germany between the summer of 1942 and the end of hostilities. With the life expectancy of a new Lancaster being just a few months, it was a miracle she survived the war.

THE BELLE UNDER ATTACK by Simon Atack

First, just small specks in the clear blue sky, high and to the right, then a shape: then in the flicker of an eye, a big enemy fighter with black crosses, orange flashes blinking along the leading edge, hurtling down at 400 mph. Barely enough time for the most alert gunner to draw a bead. Then gone! All in the space of a few seconds. More seconds pass, then “hold her steady skip, there’s another one coming in!” Then another, and another. The 91st Bomb Group’s target on Dec 20, 1942 was a large German fighter base and nearby aircraft factory south-east of Paris. The B-17 crews expected an unusually hot fighter reception and they were not to be disappointed! Simon Atack’s outstanding new painting recreates a moment of intense drama as the 324th Bomb Squadron come under attack just short of the target. Memphis Belle skipper, Bob Morgan, holds his B-17 steady for his gunners, as an Fw190 comes flashing through the formation. Today the Belle’s gunners will score at least one confirmed air victory, hit the target, and make it safely home to Bassingbourn. Bob Morgan and his Memphis Belle crew will go on to make history, becoming the first 8th Air Force bomber to complete a 25 combat mission tour over the skies above occupied Europe and Nazi Germany.

END GAME by Nicolas Trudgian

For bomber crews, any daylight bombing mission almost certainly meant combat. If it wasn't the attentions of the determined Luftwaffe fighter pilots, it would be an aerial carpet of flak that welcomed them en route to target- and again, on the journey home. On most missions the Eighth Air Force aircrews had to contend with both. Playing a major role in the great raids on Germany and other targets in occuoied Europe from early in 1944, equipped with the Consolidated B-24 Liberator, the USAAF Second Air Division flew no fewer than 95,048 sorties. Based in Norfolk, England, the crews also attacked targets far distant in Norway, Poland and Rumania. Published in support of the Memorial Trust of the Second Air Division in Norwich England, Nicolas Trudgian's new Limited Edition recreates a scene showing B-24s of the 467th Bomb Group under attack by Me262 jet interceptors on February 25th, 1945.

FINAL VICTORY by Simon Atack

Typical of the aggressive fighter pilots led by the great Hub Zemke was Robin Olds. Having completed his training on the P-38 in America, Olds arrived at RAF Wattisham, England in May 1944, assigned to fly the remarkable twin-boomed fighter with the 434th Squadron. It didn’t take long for the novice pilot to make his mark. After flying interdiction missions over France and Germany, with the 479th Olds took part in the D-Day operations, then on August 13 opened his score by jumping two Fw190s at ground level. After a brief but hectic fight, he brought both down. A couple of weeks later he bagged three Me109s – his wingman got another two – when attacking a group of some fifty enemy fighters while escorting bombers high over Muritz Zee. Converting to P-51D Mustangs, Olds completed two combat tours, flying deep penetration missions, engagements with the Luftwaffe’s new Me363 jet fighter, and strafing attacks on German facilities and airfields. By the end of the war, at 23 years of age with the rank of Major, Robin Olds was in command of 434 Squadron. His final tally was 13 air victories, and he was credited with a further 11.5 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground. Simon Atack’s powerful painting recreates Robin Olds’ last air victory of WWII. Flying Scat VII he is seen bringing down a Me109 G10 high over Germany in the late spring of 1945 while flying escort to B-17s bombers of the 381st Bomb Group. Remarkably, this P-51 survived the war and in 1958 was sold to a private owner for the princely sum of 96. In 1992 it was returned to its old wartime configuration.

ALPINE THUNDER by Nicolas Trudgian

By late April 1945 most of the Third Reich had been cut to shreds by the advancing Allied forces and those units remaining intact were regrouping in southern Germany and Austria. With American advance units nearing the outskirts of Munich, on 28th April Adolf Galland took the decision to evacuate his precious jets to Salzburg, deep in the mountains. Bad weather prevented their departure until the following morning and they only just managed to escape under the noses of the encircling Americans. Galland had hoped to battle on with JV44 but the unsuitable mountain airfields prevented the famous fighter wing from doing much to delay the inevitable. So the beautiful Alpine meadows became the final resting place for what was potentially the most formidable fighter unit of the war. In just a few days the jets were left abandoned. Their short, exhilarating war, consigned to history.

PHANTOM SHOWTIME by Robert Taylor

"Irish and I came into the break smoking at 500 knots, below the level of the flight deck. I could see thousands of men watching from the catwalks. I made a six-G break turn with 90 degree angle of bank. We landed after one of my best passes of the cruise." Commander Randy 'Duke' Cunningham. Back on deck, first to shake the hands of Lt.Randy Cunningham and his Radar Intercept Officer, Lt (jg) Willie 'Irish' Driscoll, was ordnancement Willie White: "Mr. Cunningham, we got our MiG today, didn't we!" It was January 19, 1972 aboard the USS Constellation in the Gulf of Tonkin. As Cunningham shut down the engines of his 'Fighting Falcons' F-4J Phantom, Task Force 77 Commander Admiral Cooper congratulated Cunningham and Driscoll on achieving their first of five air victories They went on to become the US Navy's only Aces of the Vietnam war.

AUGUST VICTORY by Simon Atack

Simon Atack has recreated an action flown by Pilot Officer Bob Doe during a fierce battle over the south coast, near the Isle of Wight on 18th August, 1940. Flying a Mk I Spitfire of No 234 Squadron, Boe Doe is seen bringing down an Me109 High over Southampton, one of 14 Victories he achieved during the Battle of Britain. The third highest scoring fighter pilot of the battle, 20 year old Bob Doe was one of the few Aces to fly both Spitfires and Hurricanes during the battle. Simon captures the very essence of the most tumultous of all aerial conflicts in his dramatic painting, August Victory, with Bob flying his trusted Spitfire, "D" for Doe.

SPITFIRE COUNTRY by Nicolas Trudgian

A typical scene from a bright August morning in that momentous summer of 1940. Having climbed into the dawn sky at daybreak, the Spitfires of No 603 Squadron have already been in action, and with more heavy raids on the plotters table, they scurry back to Biggin Hill to re-arm and refuel. A Messerschmitt Me109, shot down during the previous day’s fighting, lies discarded in a hay field, its lucky pilot having escaped with his life. Meanwhile, the beautiful Kent countryside comes awake as it prepares for the toils of another glorious summer's day.

VOYAGE INTO DESTINY by Robert Taylor

The battleship Bismarck off the coast of Norway at the start of "Operation Rheinubung". Under the watchful eye of Jagdeschwader 77’s Me 109 fighters, in company with the battlecruiser Prinz Eugen, and destroyers Hans Lody and Z23, Germany’s magnificent new battleship Bismarck is seen manoeuvring near Korsfjord Bergen on May 21, 1941. That evening, with Prinz Eugen, she will leave for Arctic waters, the Denmark Strait, the Atlantic, and destiny. Within days the pride of the German Kriegsmarine will have passed into history.

ONE HUNDRED UP! by Simon Atack

Piloted by RAAF skipper T.N.Scholefield, No. 467 Squadron’s Lancaster “S For Sugar”, one of RAF Bomber Command’s most famous “Lancs”, heads out on her 100th mission on May 11, 1944. Embellished with a bomb symbol painted on the fuselage signifying each raid completed, and the infamous Hermann Goering quotation “No enemy plane will fly over the Reich Territory”, the mighty bomber leads a formation bound for Germany. In total she completed 137 bombing raids. Today, beautifully restored, “S For Sugar” proudly rests in the RAF Bomber Command Museum at Hendon, London.

The GRAF SPEE by Simon Atack

The "pocket-battleship" Graf Spee catches the flood tide, making speed through a choppy cross-current as she leaves the German naval port of Wilhelmshaven for final trials a few weeks before the outbreak of war on 3rd September, 1939. Under her Captain, Hans Langsdorf, she will soon be on station in the South Atlantic in readiness for action against merchant shipping, vital to the survival of island Britain.

FAREWELL THE HOOD by Simon Atack

HMS Hood, Britain’s largest warship and pride of the Royal Navy, steams majestically through the Swept Channel on 22 May, 1941. Having fuelled at the Scapa Flow naval base in Scotland, she steers clear of floats suspending torpedo and submarine nets, as she heads for open water and the North Sea. The crew of a naval cutter wave farewell as the mighty battleship departs upon what will prove to be her final voyage.

RAISING HAVOC IN THE ARDENNES by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945 by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group and pays tribute to the Ninth Air Force pilots and crews who flew the tough missions during the Battle of the Bulge. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German Force by surprise. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated. A matching numbered companion pencil print 'VE-DAY - HEADING HOME' with EIGHT additional signatures is issued FREE with each copy of the PORTFOLIO Edition print of 'Raising Havoc in the Ardennes'.

RAT POISON by Nicolas Trudgian

Douglas A-26 Invaders of the 9th Air Force's 386th Bomb Group undergo maintenance between missions at their new base at St. Trond, Belgium in April of 1945. Overhead, a veteran Martin B-26 marauder, retained by the unit after conversion to the Invader, returns from an administrative flight to England. This particular aircraft, nick-named 'Rat Poison' by the crew, managed to survive more than 150 combat missions over Europe and was deemed an appropriate candidate to stay with the group upon receipt of their new aircraft. She continued to serve with distinction through to VE Day.

DUXFORD EAGLES by Nicolas Trudgian

Base to the legendary Douglas Bader Fighter Wing during the Battle of Britain, Duxford became home to the 78th Fighter Group in April 1943. Today it appropriately houses the American Air Museum, and hosts the many summer air-shows where crowds thrill to the sight and sound of the glorious WWII warbirds. First equipped with P-47 Thunderbolts then P-51Ds, the 78th Fighter Group was credited with 688 enemy aircraft destroyed, 474 in the air, and another 406 destroyed on the ground during low-level strafing missions. Charles London of the 78th became the 8th Air Force’s first fighter ace of the war and a 78th pilot, Quince Brown, was the first to down a Me262 jet in August 1944. Nick Trudgian’s dramatic painting vividly captures the heady atmosphere of a take-off sequence from a busy wartime Duxford. It is March 1945. Led by Colonel John Landers flying “Big Beautiful Doll”, one of the 8th Air Force’s most flamboyant fighters, the 78th P-51D Mustangs roar off the field to begin an escort mission taking B-17 Fortresses – already airborne in the background – all the way to Hamburg. Most of the hangars seen in Nick’s painting are still there today, beautifully maintained, housing flying examples of the legendary aircraft that won the Second World War. We are issuing a beautiful solid pewter scale model of the P-51 FREE with every copy of DUXFORD EAGLES purchased before January 20, 2002.

SECRET OPERATION by Robert Taylor

Manned entirely by volunteers, British and American submarines saw action in every maritime theatre during the great conflict of 1939-1945, the crews fighting their solitary, stealthy, secret war with courage and nerves of steel. Robert Taylor's evocative painting Secret Operation captures the menacing beauty of a submarine on the surface: the S-Class type H.M.S. Sceptre slips her moorings in Scapa Flow, Scotland, and glides quietly into the North Sea to begin another top secret underwater operation. On the conning tower the skipper takes a final look across the water to the distant highlands while crews below savour the fresh salt air knowing soon they will submerge into their eerie, silent, artificial world, beneath the waves.

MORNING THUNDER by Robert Taylor

There are few truly defining moments in the history of a State - single episodes that touch every citizen, and cast a nation's future. Epoch-making events that influence the entire world are even more uncommon. The events that took place in the space of less than two hours on the morning of December 7, 1941 were of such defining importance, their memory is now deeply embedded into the history of the Twentieth Century. At ten minutes to eight, as the US Pacific fleet lazily came awake suddenly, and without warning, the world around them exploded with all the mighty force of thunder: Within seconds Pearl Harbor became cloaked with attacking Japanese aircraft. Before sailors could comprehend what was happening, bombs and torpedoes had ripped out the heart of the fleet: Four of eight battleships were sunk; a dozen more naval vessels lay stricken in the water; 2400 souls perished. In those terrible few moments, the tranquil scene was transformed into a boiling cauldron of explosions, fire, smoke and unimaginable destruction. Pearl Harbor became a ranging inferno. Robert Taylor's specially commissioned masterpiece recreated desperate moments during the second wave attack at around 9am on December 7, 1941. Having taken six torpedo hits and two bomb strikes in the first wave attack on 'Battleship Row', the West Virginia is ablaze, her bows already low in the water and decks awash. Ignoring the risks, crews push the navy tug Hoga alongside with fire-fighting equipment and to pick up survivors. Overhead, Japanese Zeros swoop through the smoke, aiming the second wave attack at installations on Pearl Harbor's Ford Island, to complete one of history's most devastating unprovoked declarations of war.

AMERICA STRIKES BACK by Robert Taylor

The very first air combat fought by American pilots following the surprise attack upon Pearl Harbor. In less than one hour America struck back in a war that was to end in total victory. As the assault mounted on the Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, simultaneously the air base at Wheeler Field came under heavy attack. Two young USAAF pilots, Kenneth Taylor and George Walsh, quickly got their P-40 Tomahawks airborne. Winging southwards towards Ewa Field they ripped into a dozen or more enemy planes attacking the marine field. Diving into the formation they each downed 'Val' fighter-bombers. Robert Taylor's painting shows Ken Taylor in his P-40 tomahawk, with George Walsh in close company, bringing down his second enemy aircraft on December 7, 1941, an Aichi D-3Al ' Val' dive-bomber. In the background palls of smoke rise from Hangar 6 housing the naval float planes, and the up-turned battleship Oaklahoma.

HOME AT DAWN by Nicolas Trudgian

Northern Europe's short summer nights, with darkness lasting but a few hours, often saw the R.A.F. bomber crews returning to England at dawn, and it is one such scene which is caught on canvas in Nicolas Trudgian's new painting. As the sun comes up over the river Orwell at Pin Mill, Lancasters of No. 49 Squadron descend low over Suffolk, heading towards their base at Fiskerton. The night raid on Hamburg is almost completed. Spitfires from No. 129 Squadron based at Hornchurch, having made an early morning attack on German installations in Holland, have picked up the bombers and escorted them home.

WINGS OF GLORY by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's spellbinding painting, Wings of Glory, paying tribute to Mitchell's immortal fighter, features the MkX1X Spitfire of the RAF's Battle of Britain Memorial Flight. Powered by the Rolls-Royce Griffin engine providing maximum speed of 450mph and a 44,000 feet operating ceiling, this lovingly restored aircraft thrills generations of aviation enthusiasts with her spectacular aerobatics at Europe's summer air shows. Captured here in a magnificent study by the world's foremost aviation artist, this most beautiful of fighters gives a virtuoso performance; high among the clouds, alone in her magical element, she dances an aerial ballet like no other could. Issued with FREE Companion print, featuring MKVb Spitfire of 92 Squadron and FREE copy of Robert Taylor's new book of Air Combat Paintings Masterworks Collection, signed by the artist.

THEY LANDED BY MOONLIGHT by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor captures to perfection the secret world of the Special Operations pilot with his atmospheric painting They Landed By Moonlight. Packed with tension, he recreates the high drama of a typical rendezvous as a pilot from No. 161 Squadron based at Tangmere, readies his Lysander aircraft for take-off in a remote field deep inside occupied France. Clutching a Luger in one hand, he completes pre-take off checks as three passengers are spirited away by an armed member of the French Resistance. It is July 1943.

PEACEFUL ANCHORAGE by Robert Taylor

The formidable German East Asiatic Squadron, under the command of Vice Admiral Maximiliann Graf von Spee, took part in the first major sea battle of the First World War.

Robert Taylor’s superb painting depicts ships of the German Navy's East Asiatic Squadron, under the command of Vice Admiral Maximilian Graf von Spee. Light cruisers Nurnberg and Dresden, cruiser Gneisenau and von Spee’s flagship Scharnhorst sit at anchor in a Pacific Island bay prior to the outbreak of WWI.


MOONLIGHT HUNTER by Nicolas Trudgian

A Junkers Ju88 G-6, piloted by major Paul Zorner, Gruppenkommandeur III./NJG100, based at Stubendorf, intercepts and badly damages a four-engined Lancaster of R.A.F. Bomber Command over Germany in late 1944. Shedding debris and trailing flames, there may just be time for the crew to bale out before the mightly bomber falls away into the dark abyss.

NIGHT HUNTERS OF THE REICH by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's atmospheric painting depicts the Bf110G-4 of 47-night victory pilot Oberleutnant Martin Drewes at dusk in March 1944, heading out to intercept in-bound British four-engined bombers over north west Germany. Equipped with the latest FuG220 and 218 radars, the experienced crew will lie in wait, carefully choose their prey, stalk and close for the kill. The deadly game of hide and seek is about to begin.

NO TURNING BACK by Robert Taylor

A Lancaster of No. 61 Squadron, RAF, piloted by Flt. Lt. Bill Reid, under attack from a German Fw190 en route to Dusseldorf on the night of November 3rd, 1943. Already injured in a previous attack, Bill Reid was again wounded but pressed on for another 50 minutes to bomb the target, then fly his badly damaged aircraft on the long journey home. The courage and devotion to duty that earned Bill Reid the Victoria Cross, was a hallmark of RAF bomber crews throughout their long six year campaign.

LANCASTER UNDER ATTACK by Robert Taylor

A Lancaster of No. 626 Squadron takes evasive action during a raid over Osterfeld in December 1944, as a Messerschmitt Me110 G.4 night-fighter makes a pass beneath the bomber. Both crews are locked in a desperate close-quarters fight, acutely aware of each other's presence in their bid to out manoeuvre each other.

AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS MASTERWORKS COLLECTION by Robert Taylor

A Collection Of Air Combat Paintings by Robert Taylor Foreword by: Colonel Don Lopez, Flying Tiger, test pilot, and Deputy Director of the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum, Washington DC A new, attractively priced soft-back book of Air Combat Paintings by Robert Taylor showing 60 of his finest images completed in the past quarter century, during which time he has dominated the aviation art genre. Robert's personal narrative describing his paintings and drawings –some not seen in previous volumes - provides a wonderful insight into each work of art, and how his vibrant canvases comes about. Packed with full colour, its 128 pages comprise a veritable aviation art gallery you will want to return to time and time again. A wonderful addition to your personal library, and a most acceptable gift for the aviation enthusiast.

RETURN TO RATTLESDEN by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's fine new painting shows a battle-damaged B-17G of the 447th Bomb Group on final approach to Rattlesden, returning from a strike against road and rail communications in northern Germany in February, 1945. A P-51 pilot from the 359th Fighter Group, having escorted the injured bomber all the way home.

SPECIAL DUTIES by Robert Taylor

A Ju52 Luftflotte 2, escorted by Me109s of JG-53, transports important military personnel over the Dolomites in the summer of 1942. With the setting sun illuminating the mountain tops in a brilliant light, the panoramic vista is both chilling and spectacular. As the aircraft lumbers across the impressive mountain scenery, members of the High command can be seen in conference in the cabin, while the crew in the cockpit concentrate on their 'Special Duties' flight plan the Ju52 became the Luftwaffe's primary wartime transport aircraft, taking part in every German army land operation during World War II.

ARDENNES OFFENSIVE by Nicolas Trudgian

Trudgian vividly reconstructs an authentic scene from Germany's final offensive of World War II - the Battle of the Bulge. This action-packed painting depicts Fw190s of JG1 providing close support to the 9th SS Panzer Division, as they spearhead Germany's final major offensive. Seen advancing on the 82nd Airborne Division, the King Tiger tanks, with the aid of Luftwaffe ground-attack fighters, drive the Americans back through the snowy fields of the Ardennes on Christmas Day, 1944.

DESERT SHARKS AND EAGLES by Nicolas Trudgian

The air war fought in the skies above the inhospitable wastelands of the North African desert were among the most hotly contested of the war. The outcome of the bitter land war raging below largely depended upon who controlled the air space above, and both sides knew it. Nick's powerful painting brings home the intensity of the air fighting. A dog-fight between Me109s from JG-27 and P-40 Kittyhawks of the RAF's 12 Squadron, led by 'Killer' Caldwell, and later Billy Drake, 112 Squadron were in constant combat with Edu Neumann's fighters as they jousted for air supremacy above Rommel's advancing Afrika Korps tanks. Below them, the desolate beauty of the Libyan desert stretches as far as the eye can see.

STRUGGLE FOR SUPREMACY by Robert Taylor

P51 Mustangs of the 357th Fighter Group, escorting a heavy bomber raid deep into enemy territory, have engaged a strong force of Luftwaffe Me109s. A massive dog-fight has developed high over the Rhine. Captain Robert Foy of 363rd Squadron engages one of the Me109s in a daring head-on pass. P47 Thunderbolts of 56th Fighter Group climb to give support.

MOUNTAIN WOLF by Nicolas Trudgian

Set in a spectacular mountain scene, Nicolas Trudgian's print records the last days of air combat as World War II drew to a close. The most feared of the Luftwaffe's remaining units were those equipped with the remarkable Me262 fighter jet, but they were vulnerable to attack during take-off and landing. Commanding JV-44, General Galland countered the threat by employing Fw190 "Dora" 9s to fly top cover. Nicolas Trudgian's painting depicts the colourful Fw190 of Hptm Waldermar Wubke of JV-44 as he prepared to scramble "Red Three" at Ainring airfield in may 1945.

TIMBER WOLF by Nicolas Trudgian

Leutnant Klaus Bretschneider, Staffelkapitan of 5./JG300 kicks up the dust as he taxies his Fw190 A-8 "Red One" from its forest hiding place into the sunlight in preparation for take-off. The scene is northern Germany, November 1944. The Staffelkapitan will lead his 190s in a massed 'sturm' intercept upon incoming American bombers. With Allied fighters dominating the skies, Luftwaffe fighter units took desperate measures to conceal their whereabouts. Commonplace were these hurriedly prepared strips, often near dense forests.

THE MARITIME PAINTINGS of ROBERT TAYLOR by Robert Taylor

‘Perhaps one of Robert Taylor's outstanding characteristics is his use of colour in his works. Always smooth and effective, it brings out the light and shade of our ships in whatever situation they find themselves. This is a glorious collection to be treasured for life’ The Rt. Hon. Sir Edward Heath ‘As a wartime captain of a destroyer, and in command of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla, I have taken a keen personal interest in the preservation of H.M.S. Cavalier – the last survivor of the classic destroyers. Robert Taylor’s painting of H.M.S. Cavalier is quite magnificent. He has captured magnificently the colours of the Arctic waters. His pictures of my old command, H.M.S. Kelly, is also superb’ Admiral of the Fleet, Lord Louis Mountbatten This, the fourth volume published featuring Robert Taylor's art, is the first devoted solely to his maritime paintings. Many of the images have never previously been seen in public. Over 50 paintings are shown in full colour, together with a host of pencil drawings, accompanied by fascinating commentary by the artist revealing how he develops his canvases from their initial concept to completion. His relaxed style of writing is a pleasure to read, and this new volume completes a visually stunning record of Robert Taylor's artistic achievement for lovers of ships and the sea. Renowned for meticulous research and accuracy, his attention to detail is apparent in all his work, whether sketches, working drawings or finished paintings. His brushstrokes somehow evoke the very sounds and smell of the sea. The marvellous precision and clarity with which he portrays the ships in his paintings is also to be seen in his treatment of the sea and sky, which he paints with equal mastery.

SINKING THE TIRPITZ by Nicolas Trudgian

After attempts spanning four years, on 12th November 1944, Lancasters of Number 9 and 617 Squadrons successfully attacked the German battleship Tirpitz in Tromso Fjord, Norway. Led by Wing Commander James Tait, using the 12000lb 'Tallboy' bomb devised by Barnes Wallis, the Lancaster crews devastated the huge ship in a massive aerial bombardment, the Tirpitz capsizing and sinking inside just eleven minutes.

COMBAT OVER THE REICH by Robert Taylor

Approaching their target at he oil refinery at Zwickau, 60 miles south west of Dresden, the 452nd Bomb Group's B-17 Fortresses were bounced by 28 Me262 jets from JG 7. Screaming in from the six o/clock position, the jet pilots singles out the 3rd division just as they began their bombing run. The B-17 Fortress crew, having lost part of the tailplane, desperately defend their unwieldy bomber against the determined high-speed, by laying a wall of lead in the path of the Me262s.

CAUGHT ON THE SURFACE by Robert Taylor

In a strange quirk of fate, a Sunderland of 461 Sqn RAAF identification letter U, destroys submarine U-461, a type XIV tanker, one of three German submarines caught on the surface by Allied aircraft in the Bay of Biscay on July 30, 1943. At extreme low level, Sunderland 'U' braves a barrage of gunfire from all three encircling German submarines to deliver a successful depth charge attack, sinking U-461 in a single pass. In an act of grace, the Sunderland pilot returned to the scene to drop a dingy to the U-boat survivors.

JET HUNTERS ACE OF ACES ORIGINAL DRAWING EDITION by Robert Taylor

The original drawing that accompanies JET HUNTERS

RUHR VALLEY INVADERS by Nicolas Trudgian

Arriving at high speed over a busy German rail yard in the heart of the Ruhr Valley, barely skimming the nearby factory chimney stacks on the way into the target, the A-26 crews of the 386th Bomb Group deliver a devastating blow, leaving a trail of destruction in their wake. With bombs away, the Invader crews strafe the area with their ten forward-firing machine guns, the roar of their engines heightening the confusion on the ground.

SUMMER OF '44 by Nicolas Trudgian

Mk IX Spitfires of No. 126 Squadron return to base following a low-level attack on German installations in Normandy, a few days prior to D-Day, June 1944.Below, a busy railway station is surrounded by the activity of American troops making final preparations for the greatest invasion in history.

ATTACK ON THE HIEI by Robert Taylor

Marine Ace Captain Joe Foss leads a flight of eight F4F Wildcats of VMF121, based at Henderson Field, Guadalcanal, in a diversionary attack on the Imperial Japanese battlecruiser Hiei north of Savo Island, Friday November 13, 1942. In the distance TBF Avenger torpedo bombers of VMSB-131, having already attacked from the starboard side, head for base. That evening, after relentless air attack, the Hiei, disappeared beneath the sea- the first Japanese battleship sunk by American Forces in World War II.

HEAD TO HEAD by Nicolas Trudgian

A classic head-to-head combat between Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone in his Spitfire and an Me109 over the south coast of England on 25th August, 1940. With 602 Squadron scrambled to intercept an approaching raid. The Commanding Officer notches up his second victory of the day.

THE DRAGONS OF COLOMBERT by Nicolas Trudgian

In the summer of 1940, JG3, under the command of Hans von Hahn, scramble their Me109’s from their French countryside base at Colombert, near Calais. With the deafening sound of their piston-engined aircraft, sporting the group’s colourful Dragon emblem on their cowlings, they head for the battle front.

HURRICANE HEROES by Nicolas Trudgian

Hurricanes of 87 Squadron return to their West Country base after repelling attacks by Luftwaffe bombers on nearby aircraft factories, August 1940. Flight Lieutenant Ian Gleed's Hurricane, in which he scored 20 victories, leads the Squadron pilots back to base to refuel, re-arm, and get airborne without delay.

FIRST FLAP OF THE DAY by Nicolas Trudgian

‘HM’ Stephen - one of the Battle of Britain's top scoring fighter pilots, brings down two Me109s in quick succession over the White Cliffs of Dover, early on August 11, 1940. Flying a Spitfire with 74 Squadron, 'HM' shot down five German aircraft on this day, and damaged a further three. The note in his log book starts "First flap of the day at 0600 hrs ..."

BOB STANFORD-TUCK TRIBUTE FOLIO by Nicolas Trudgian

Bob Stanford-Tuck waits at dispersal in his 257 Squadron Hurricane during the Battle of Britain. Promoted to command 257 Squadron, Bob was one of the Battle of Britain's leading Aces.

GLORIOUS SUMMER by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's magnificent study of the legendary Hurricane captures wonderfully the spirit of that cataclysmic aerial conflict fought so long ago. Nearest, young Pilot Officer Geoffrey Page, later to become one of the RAF's most highly decorated fighter Aces, powers his Mk I Hurricane over the country lane at the edge of the airfield, as he and his fellow No 56 Squadron pilots make their third scramble of the day.

RISE OF THE TANKS by

Each matted print is issued with a matching-numbered copy of the outstanding book Rise of the Tank written by military historian Michael Foley. Using a vast array of resources from the Imperial War Museum, The National Archives, the Tank Museum and even a field service pocket book of a 2nd Lt of the 10th Tank Battalion, Foley explores how the development of the tank played a key role in the Allied effort during the First World War.

Issued in its own luxury embossed slipcase, this hugely informative book is illustrated with over 100 original images.

BREAKING COVER - EAGLES EDITION by Robert Taylor

Concealed in the woods of northern France, Fw190 pilots break cover ready for a quick take-off to intercept Allied bombers in the summer of 1944.

BREAKING COVER - LUFTWAFFE TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

Concealed in the woods of northern France, Fw190 pilots break cover ready for a quick take-off to intercept Allied bombers in the summer of 1944

JET INTERCEPTORS by Nicolas Trudgian

Herbert Ihlefeld's personal He162 ‘White 23’ - the revolutionary Heinkel ‘Peoples Fighter’ - on patrol with JG1.This aircraft was captured intact and is today preserved in the National Air & Space Museum in Washington DC.

WINTER COMBAT by Nicolas Trudgian

Hannes Trautloft in his FW190 leading his famous JG54 bring down a Russian Petlyakov Pe-2 on the Eastern Front in 1943. This dramatic painting is set in a superb winter landscape.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS ofROBERT TAYLORVOLUME FOUR by Robert Taylor

‘His talent reaches into our hearts and minds with an emotional impact equaled by very few. Ages from now scholars and laymen will look upon this past century of ours through his paintings and will know us well.’ Brigadier General ROBIN OLDS I believe that Robert Taylor’s work is extremely important. Through his artistry future generations, whom we hope need never be called upon to defend freedom in the way we were, will gain a realistic impression of what it was like to fly in mortal combat the legendary fighter and bomber aircraft that competed for the skies during the greatest war ever fought. His beautifully detailed paintings will help keep alive this period in our history. Colonel WALKER ‘BUD’ MAHURIN ‘Robert Taylor will continue to enthrall all of us with his artistry and I personally look forward to the pleasure of viewing many more of his paintings’ Major MARTIN DREWES Widely regarded as the world’s foremost aviation artist, Robert Taylor enjoys a level of popularity rare among living artists. This fourth volume of air combat paintings features a collection of the artist’s most recent works, and will delight the tens of thousands of his followers who have avidly collected his earlier books. In it Robert Taylor guides readers through the various stages of preparation and development of a painting, revealing more about his technique, his methods of research, some of the difficulties he encounters, and how he overcomes them. This intriguing insight is studded with fascinating anecdotes as he recounts meetings with some of the great aviators he meets during the course of his work. This new book is a veritable art gallery in itself, and makes an irresistible addition to the libraries of all those who love the Taylor style.

FIGHT FOR THE SKY by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's wonderfully realistic painting captures the very essence of that epic battle. A Heinkel III has been brought down, one of many never to make it home on this bright and sunny day. As the Luftwaffe bomber's crew emerge from their broken aircraft, relieved to have survived the crash-landing, a Mk I Spitfire from No 66 Squadron roars low overhead to verify another victory.

BLACK DEVIL by Nicolas Trudgian

Top-scoring ace of all time, Erich Hartmann, scrambles his black tulip nose Me109 from a snow-covered airfield on the Eastern Front. Christened "Black Devil" by Russian pilots, many of whom hurriedly vacated the vacinity when Hartmann's distinctively painted fighter appeared. Hartmann ended the war with 352 air victories.

ALFA-STRIKE by Nicolas Trudgian

In the Vietnam war Squadron VA-163 was stationed aboard the carrier Oriskany on its second cruise, the squadron's A-4 Skyhawks were led by Commander Wynn Foster, one of the navy's most aggressive strike leaders, and under Air Wing Commander James Stockdale, the A-4 pilots racked up a formidable record as a top fighting unit.

VIPER VENOM by Robert Taylor

Pilots from the 31st and the 52nd Fighter Wings climb their heavily armed F-16 Vipers out of Aviano Air Base, Italy, on a strike mission over Bosnia, June 1999.

STORMCLOUDS GATHER by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's limited edition depicts Me109s of I/JG2, under the command of the brilliant Helmut Wick, setting out on a mission across the English Channel in September 1940. Wick, seen in the foreground, with Gunther Seeger off his starboard wing, was the top-scoring Luftwaffe Ace in the Battle of Britain with 56 victories.

JET STRIKE by Nicolas Trudgian

Arguably the most significant fighter leader of World War II, Adolf Galland took command of all German day and night fighters, but was in constant dispute with Luftwaffe supreme, Goering, who ultimately sacked him. Reinstated by Hitler, Galland returned to active combat in the final year of the war, commanding the legendary JV44 fighter wing, flying the Me262 jet. The great Adolf Galland ended the war as he had begun - flying fighters in daily combat, the only serving General ever to lead a combat wing in action. Nick's painting shows Galland's Me262s of JV-44 climbing to intercept a formation of B-17s in April, 1945.

THE CHECKERTAIL CLAN by Nicolas Trudgian

With their brightly coloured checkertail tails there was no mistaking the P.51 Mustangs of the 325th Fighter Group. Escorting B-24s over Austria in August 1944, tangled with a group of Fw190 fighters. The ensuing dogfight spiraled down below the mountain peaks as Herky Green led the 'Checkertails' in a low-level chase. Herky nails one Fw190. Behind him his pilots will take out the two Fw190. When all is done this day the 325th will be credited with 15 enemy fighters destroyed.

VULCAN THUNDER by Nicolas Trudgian

An Avro Vulcan BMk2 of No. 617 (dambuster) Squadron thunders into the air in a scene from the early 1960's. Painted in all-white anti-nuclear flash markings these Vulcan's formed the mainstay of the R.A.F. nuclear strike force.

MOSQUITOS OVER THE RHINE by Nicolas Trudgian

Mosquitos from No 105 Squadron R.A.F. based at Marham, Norfolk, England, on a low-level intruder strike over the Rhine river, Germany in December 1942.

HUNTER FORCE by Nicolas Trudgian

A pair of Hawker Hunter Mk9 jets from No.58 Squadron R.A.F. based at R.A.F. Wittering are seen climbing over the south coast of England in 1973

R.M.S. TITANIC by Robert Taylor

Passengers aboard the Isle of Wight ferry gaze in wonder as RMS Titanic steams majestically down the Solent at the outset of her maiden voyage, April 10, 1912.

LAUNCH AGAINST THE BISMARCK by Robert Taylor

Late in the day on May 26 1941, in deteriorating weather, 15 Fairey Swordfish biplanes launched form the heavy deck of the aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal. Each was armed with a single torpedo, its task to halt the escape of the battleship Bismarck. The navy pilots knew they must succeed before dark; the following morning the German battleship would reach the protection of Luftwaffe aircraft based in France.

Contending with turbulence and sea spray, one by one the Swordfish made their attack, running in just feet above the waves. The frail biplanes were met with a barrage of murderous gunfire, Bismarck bringing all possible armament to bear.

Attempting to avoid the incoming attack, the 42,000 ton battleship was in a high-speed turn when a torpedo from a Number 2 subflight Swordfish struck her steering gear. The explosion irreparably jammed her rudder over 12 degrees sealing the fate of the mighty warship. Unable to steer, all she could do was await the dawn and the arrival of the British Home Fleet.

Robert’s dramatic painting, which now hangs in the Fleet Air Arm Museum, brings to like those perilous moments as a Swordfish struggles for height having just left the rolling deck of HMS Ark Royal.

G FOR GEORGE by Robert Taylor


ROLLING THUNDER by Robert Taylor

Flying down Thud Ridge at just below the speed of sound, Jack Broughton leads an F-105 Thunderchief raid on the power plant at Viet Tri, North Vietnam, March12, 1967. The target was destroyed.

BADER LEGEND by Robert Taylor

The legendary Wing Leader Douglas Bader high above the south coast of England, flying his beloved Mark Va Spitfire. Bader's inspired leadership spawned some of World War II's greatest fighter leaders- Johnnie Johnson, Denis Crowley-Milling, 'Cocky' Dundas and many others.

VICTORY OVER GOLD by Nicolas Trudgian

The morning of June 7, 1944 a dozen JU88s appeared over Gold Beach, intent of making a diving attack on the heavily populated beachhead. The patrolling Spitfires of 401 Squadron wasted no time in getting into the fray. In the ensuing dogfight the Canadian pilots destroyed no fewer than six of the JU88s, and the attack on the beach was averted.

MOMENT OF DESTINY by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor captures the final moments before Colonel Jimmy Doolittle's take-off from the carrier Hornet, just before 8.20am on April 18, 1942. The tension aboard the carrier reaches a crescendo as Doolittle brings the engines to full power, his B-25 straining against the brakes. Within seconds he will hurtle off the deck, followed by 15 intrepid Doolittle Raider crews; their destination, Tokyo.

THE DOOLITTLE RAIDERS by Robert Taylor

Doolittle Raiders take their B-25 bombers down to very low level and head for China after delivering their surprise attack on the industrial and military targets in and around Tokyo on April 18, 1942. The sixteen-ship mission, led by volunteer crews, successfully completed one of the most audacious air raids of World War II.

MOMENT OF DESTINY by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor captures the final moments before take-off from the carrier Hornet. The tension aboard reaches a crescendo as Colonel Jimmy Doolittle brings the engines to full power, his B-25 straining against the brakes. Within seconds, he will hurtle off the deck followed by 15 intrepid Doolittle Raider crews, their destination- Tokyo!

OPERATION BODENPLATTE by Nicolas Trudgian

The success of Operation Bodenplatte, on January 1, 1945, was to be achieved by mass surprise attacks on British and American bases in France, Belgium and Holland. It was a battle fought at great cost to the Luftwaffe. During the battles some 300 Luftwaffe aircraft were lost. Though 200 Allied aircraft were destroyed, most on the ground, pilot losses were light. Nicolas Trudgian's brilliant painting takes us right into the action above the Allied air base at Eindhoven. Me262 jets join a concentration of Me109s and Fw190s of JG-3 fighter wing, as they hurtle across the airfield in an assault that lasted 23 minutes, while Spitfires from 414 Sqn RCAF do their best to repel the attack. On the ground Typhoon fighters of 439 Sqn take a hammering.

BIRTH OF A LEGEND by Robert Taylor


BATTLESHIP ROW - THE AFTERMATH by Robert Taylor

Reproduced from Robert Taylor's stunning pencil drawing, one of his finest ever, this evocative and dramatic scene shows the famous Battleship Row at Pearl Harbor immediately after the Japanese attack on December 7, 1941.

THE LEGEND OF COLIN KELLY by Robert Taylor

Captain Colin Kelly's 19th Bomb Group B-17C is outnumbered by Japanese Zero's as it returns to Clark Field in the Philippines, December 10, 1941. After completing a successful bombing attack on the Japanese heavy cruiser Ashigara, with his aircraft badly damaged and on fire, Kelly remained at the controls while his crew bailed out. Seconds later the crippled B-17 exploded Colin Kelly became America's first World War II aviation hero, was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and a legend was born.

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 2015 CALENDAR 4 by The Military Gallery

A COLLECTION OF ICONIC PAINTINGS BY THE WORLDS FOREMOST AVIATION ARTISTS, COMMEMORATING THE 75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 2015 CALENDAR 3 by The Military Gallery

A COLLECTION OF ICONIC PAINTINGS BY THE WORLDS FOREMOST AVIATION ARTISTS, COMMEMORATING THE 75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 2015 CALENDAR 2 by The Military Gallery

A COLLECTION OF ICONIC PAINTINGS BY THE WORLDS FOREMOST AVIATION ARTISTS, COMMEMORATING THE 75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN

TIGERS IN NORMANDY by Nicolas Trudgian

In their desperate attempt to hold Caen, the most important city in the Normandy campaign, Tiger tanks of SS-Panzer Battalion 103 push through the village of Maltot during the ebb and flow of the bitterly fought battle for Point 112, late July 1944. Me109s of III/JG26 lend support from above.

BATTLE FOR THE ISLANDS by Nicolas Trudgian

Corsairs of VMF 121 provide close air support to the US landings on Rendova, June 30, 1943. Fiercely contested, the invasion force was heavily attacked by Zero fighters and Mitsubishi G4M1 'Betty' bombers, flying from their base at Rabaul. Dog-fighting at tree-top height, VMF 121 Corsairs rip into a bunch of Betty bombers as they try to make their escape following their attack on shipping. On fire, the Betty in the foreground is doomed, and will shortly become one of 19 Japanese aircraft accounted for by VMF 121. Other Marine fighter units brought the total this day to a staggering 58 enemy aircraft destroyed.

RICHTHOFEN'S FLYING CIRCUS by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's dramatic painting recreates a scene near Cambrai, Northern France on the morning of March 18, 1918. Aware of a build-up of forces for a massive German offensive, many RFC squadrons attacked the German positions at very low altitude. Responding with as many squadrons as they could muster, including Richthofen's JG1 wing, there followed one of the largest dog-fights of the entire First World War. Seen in the foreground are a Fokker Triplane and an Albatros, having 'winged' a Sopwith Camel from 54 Squadron, as another Camel, and a Bristol fighter of 11 Squadron RFC turn to engage the German fighters. The entire scene captures the very essence of the First World War, and will thrill enthusiasts of aviation history.

REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR by Robert Taylor

Aichi D-3A1 dive bombers from the Japanese carrier Kaga concentrate their attack on the battleship Nevada, already holed by torpedoes and beached at Hospital Point. The destroyer Shaw is on fire, and behind her the battleship Pennsylvania, the cruiser Helena, and the Base Force Flagship Argonne, can be seen in the turmoil of Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941

KNIGHTS OF THE SKY by Nicolas Trudgian

The dramatic scene depicts an aerial dog-fight between Sopwith Camels and SE5A fighters of the Royal Flying Corps, and the bright red planes of Baron von Richthofen's JG1 fighter wing. High over Northern France, the highly manoeuvrable fighters wheel and turn in the cauldron of close aerial combat, the artist bringing alive that evocative era when aerial combat first began.

MOST MEMORABLE DAY by Robert Taylor

Adolf Galland and his wingman Bruno Hegenauer break through the fighter escort of No. 303 Squadron's Spitfires to attack Blenheim bombers of No. 21 Squadron over northern France, 21 June 1941. In two missions that day Galland claimed two Blenheims and one Spitfire, survived a forced crash-landing, and later a parachute escape from his blazing Me109. That evening he learned he was to become the first recipient of the Knights Cross with oak leaves and swords - Germany's highest award for heroism.

EARLY MORNING BRIEFING by Barry Rowe

One of two editions by Barry Rowe commemorating the pilots and planes that flew the early airmail routes in America. The Eastern Air transport Pitcairn Mailwing first saw service in 1928.

US MAIL - COAST TO COAST by Barry Rowe

A de Havilland DH4 prepares to carry the mail from New York to Cleveland in the summer of 1918. Artist Barry Rowe's carefully researched paintings, together with his colourful interpretations of the early days of air transport, have won him wide acclaim.

GREYCAP LEADER by Robert Taylor

Leading 433 (Canadian) Squadron, top Allied Fighter Ace Johnnie Johnson -Greycap Leader - has already bagged an Fw190, and is hauling his MKIX Spitfire around looking for a second in heavy dog-fighting over the Rhine, September 1944. In the distance more enemy fighters appear; they too will receive the attention of the Canadians.

CLASH OVER REMAGEN by Nicolas Trudgian

When the American Army reached the Rhine at Remagen on March 7, 1945, such was the speed of their advance, they arrived before the retreating Germans had time to blow the vital bridge. The Americans seized the bridge intact. Realising the threat to the German defences, the Luftwaffe were ordered into destroy the bridge at all costs. Desperate efforts were made to attack the bridge, and over the course of the following days the fighting became one of the legendary battles of the war. Nicolas Trudgian's carefully researched painting becomes an important record of one of the fiercest battles of World War II. Two RAF Tempests have flown right through the Luftwaffe formation of Me262 and Arado 234 jets bombers, the high speed aircraft missing each other by feet. The concentration of the desperate attackers is broken momentarily, sufficiently so that their bombs miss the target - but more Luftwaffe aircraft can be seen streaming into attack!

BALLOON BUSTER by Robert Taylor

Flying a Sopwith Camel with RFC Squadron 208, Flight Lieutenant Henry Botterell brings down a German observation balloon near ARras, northern France, August 29, 1918. Botterell acknowledges the observer with a chivalrous salute before departing the scene.

MUSTANG MAYHEM by Nicolas Trudgian

As 'Red Dog' Norley's P-51D screams across the field at hangar height with his squadron's Mustangs fanned out behind him, the 4th Fighter Group pilots jink through the intense groundfire wreaking havoc on the ground. In this, its final major mission of the war, the group destroyed no fewer than 105 enemy aircraft in two blishtering airfield attacks.

SPITFIRES OVER DARWIN by Robert Taylor


MOST MEMORABLE DAY - The Final Drawing by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor relives General Adolf Galland's personal account of the combat at noon on 21 June 1941 over northern France.

With his wingman Bruno Hegenauer, Galland powers his Me109 through the fighter escort to attack Blenheim bombers of 21 Sqn, raking the lead aircraft with cannon fire. In the background, a fierce dogfight is developing between the Me109s of JG26 and Spitfires of 303 Sqn. Losses and victories will be high on both sides.

In two missions that day Galland claimed two Blenheims and one Spitfire, survived a forced crash-landing, and later a parachute escape from his blazing Me109. That evening he learned he was to become the first recipient of the Knights Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords - Germany's highest award for heroism.

PHANTOM STRIKE by Robert Taylor


BATTLE OF KURSK by Nicolas Trudgian


OPERATION CHASTISE by Robert Taylor

A Massive plume of water erupts as the bouncing bomb from Sqn Ldr ‘Dinghy’Young’s Lancaster scores a direct hit on the Möhne Dam, at 00.40 hours on the night of 16/17 May, 1943. Having already made their attacks, Flt Lt Micky Martin andW/Cdr Guy Gibson bravely circle the flak positions with navigation lights on, drawing enemy fire. By destroying the Möhne and Eder Dams, and damaging the Sorpe Dam, the Lancasters of 617 Squadron recorded one of the most remarkable night air operations of WorldWar Two.

HOLDING THE LINE by Nicolas Trudgian

Nine Dornier Co17Z bombers of 9th Staffel, KG76, detailed to attack the RAF airfield at Kenley were spotted as they approached the English coast, and Hurricanes were scrambled to intercept. As the German bombers lined up to attack the airfield, Hurricanes of 111 Squadron came diving upon them. Suddenly all hell broke loose. Bombs rained down on the airfield, one Dornier was brought down and two more were finished off by the Hurricane pilots. Now the chase was on to catch the others. Nicolas Trudgian's action-packed painting depicts the scene as the surviving Dorniers reach the English coastline. Only one of the nine Dorniers that set out will return to base on that 18th day of August, 1940.

EAGLES AT DAWN by Robert Taylor

Glinting in the sub-zero early morning sunlight as fresh sow begins to fall, and led by their Gruppenkommandeur Erich Hartmann, the Me109G fighters of I./JG53 scramble off the snow covered airstrip at Veszprem in Hungary, February 1945. They will intercept waves of Russian fighters and bombers in the skies above Czechoslovakia in a last ditch attempt to repel the impending invasion.

INTO THE CLOAK OF DARKNESS by Nicolas Trudgian

A Heinkel 219 and a Messerschmitt 110 of NJG-1 climbing out from their base a Munster Hansdorf, as they set out on a deadly mission. Ten aircraft took off to intercept a major raid on Dusseldorf, the night witnessing a fierce battle high above the darkened city. NJG-1 crews assisted with the downing of 19 RAF bombers, one Luftwaffe pilot being credited with no fewer than 6 victories that night. Below them the spectacular Ruhr Valley is vibrant in its mantle of winter's first snowfall on the night of November 2, 1944

CHANCE ENCOUNTER by Robert Taylor

A Dornier 24 flying boat of the Royal Netherlands Navy sights the Japanese invasion fleet off Kuching, British Borneo, 23 December, 1941. By chance it also sighted patrolling Dutch submarine K-X1V on the surface, unaware of the enemy position. Receiving the pilot’s signal “enemy to the north east”, the submarine quickly engaged, sinking two ships and damaging two in one of the first Allied successes against the Japanese in World War II.

BRINGING THE PEACEMAKER HOME by Robert Taylor

Damaged by Fw190s during a raid to Leipzig in July 1944, B-17 Fortress 'The Peacemaker' of the 91st Bomb Group has slipped out of formation and is struggling to maintain height. Her crew are busy jettisoning everything possible to save weight, as the English coast comes into view.

Thanks to their efforts and the close escort provided by P-51s of the 361st Fighter Group, The Peacemaker would make it back to Bassingbourne that day; eight other bombers from the raid did not.

THE SPOILS OF WAR – MARKET GARDEN TRIBUTE EDITION by Simon Smith

Issued with the Tribute Edition of the print THE SPOILS OF WAR

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE

FIRST STRIKE ON BERLIN by Nicolas Trudgian

The first successful daylight raid on Berlin. Nicolas Trudgian's painting relives the fearsome aerial combat on March 6, 1944, as B-17 Flying Fortresses of the 100th B.G. are attacked. Screaming in head-on, Fw190s of II./JG I charge into the bomber stream. With throttles wide open, 56th Fighter Group P-47 Thunderbolts come hurtling down to intercept. B-17 gunners are working overtime; the air is full of cordite, smoke, jagged pieces of flying metal and hot lead. We are in the midst of one of the fiercest aerial battles of the war.

TANGMERE WING by Robert Taylor


FIGHTER GENERAL by Robert Taylor

Having completed a successful bomber intercepton high above Salzburg, the ME262s led by Adolf Galland, are returning towards Munich-Riem at full throttle, hugging the deck to avoid the attentions of USAAF escort fighters. Below the crew of a B-24, brought down in the air-fighting,has survived a dramatic crash-landing amid spectacular surroundings.

MISSION BEYOND DARKNESS by Robert Taylor

Following the attack against Admiral Ozawa’s Japanese carrier fleet on June 20, 1944, Admiral Mitscher defies all rules of naval engagement: In total darkness, with the ever-present danger of enemy submarines, he orders every ship in his Task Force 58 to switch on lights to guide over 100 returning carrier-borne aircraft, all desperately low on fuel. Amid the confusion, unable to get a landing slot aboard the USS Lexington, and now out of fuel, a pilot and his gunner scramble from their ditched SB2B Curtiss Helldiver, as a Fletcher class destroyer manoeuvres to make the pick up.

DESERT VICTORY by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's painting Desert Victory recreates all the atmosphere of the North African desert war with a stunning portrayal of the Me109s of 3./JG-27. The wing is depicted being led by Staffelkapitan Gerhard Homuth as they escort Afrikakorps armor heading for the front line at Gazala, Libya, on February 21, 1942. Flying alongside Homuth, the great Luftwaffe Ace Joachim Marseille scored his 49th and 50th victories on this day, earning his Knight's Cross. Below, the crew of an SdKfz 10 light half-track stop to investigate a crashed P-40 Kittyhawk belonging to No 112 Squadron RAF, brought down during an earlier contest

FRONT LINE HURRICANES by Robert Taylor

Based at a temporary formed airfield at Lille Marc, Hurricanes of No. 87 Squadron - showing the strains of battle - taxi in from a skirmish during heavy fighting in the Battle of France, May 1940.

THEIR FINEST HOUR by Nicolas Trudgian

On August 16 over 1700 German aircraft crossed the coast and R.A.F. bases in the south-east were taking a pounding. Hawkinge, a satellite of the Biggin Hill sector station, lay right in the path of the raiding Luftwaffe hordes. Refueled and re-armed, with scarlet patches covering the gunports all serviceable aircraft roar off the grass strip and head back to the fray.

SIGHTING THE BISMARCK by Robert Taylor

At 10.30 on the morning of 26th May, 1941, a lone Catalina of 209 Squadron rediscovers the mighty German battleship Bismarck - pride of the Kriegsmarine - which had eluded the Royal Navy for more than 32 hours. Heavy flak surrounds the Catalina as she signals the position of the Bismarck - some 700 miles west of Brest - to the Admiralty. The following day, confronted by the Royal Navy battleships King George V and Rodney, supported by 2 cruisers, the Bismarck was sunk during one of the epic actions of modern naval warfare.

OPERATION TIDAL WAVE by Nicolas Trudgian

At first light on August 1, 1943 a force of 178 B-24 Liberator bombers lifted off dusty airstrips in the Libyan desert. The target - the oil refineries at Ploesti. Nicolas Trudgian's detailed painting Operation Tidal Wave is a moving tribute to the 1700 aircrew who flew the tortuous Ploesti Raid. Depicted exiting the target at extreme low-level are B-24s of the 44th and 98th Bomb Groups, with the 98th BG B-24 'Sandman' in the immediate foreground. In the distance other Liberators lucky enough to have survived the fiery maelstrom make their escape. Behind them fires rage among the structures of the refinery as yet more crews enter the holocaust.

THE GALLANT OHIO by Robert Taylor

Spitfires of 126 and 185 Squadrons successfully fend off a last desperate attempt by enemy aircraft to sink the crippled American tanker Ohio, still some 80 miles short of the beleaguered island of Malta. Badly damaged and barely afloat the Ohio, assisted by Royal Navy destroyers Penn, (foreground), Bramham (lashed to Ohio’s port side) and Ledbury, limped into port to a tumultuous welcome, on August 15, 1942. Her vital cargo of fuel kept the island’s air defences alive, and ultimately made the island secure.

WINTER WOLVES by Nicolas Trudgian


TOKYO BOUND by Nicolas Trudgian

On April 18, 1942, under the leadership of Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle, a small force of B-25 Mitchell light bombers set forth on one of the most audacious air raids of World War II. Launching, in a rough sea, from the heaving deck of the carrier USS Hornet, the crews knew that even if they achieved success, they were not to return. Their mission: to bomb Tokyo. Nicolas Trudgian's stunning portrayal of Jimmy Doolittle's B-25 depicted moments after leaving the deck of the Hornet.

DAWN OPERATIONS by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's limited edition Dawn Operations captures a typical Pacific wartime scene during one of those few tranquil moments when conflict seems a million miles away. As dawn breaks over the naval base on the island of Shortland, off the southern tip of Bourgainville, a Mitsubishi F1M2 float plane is readied for its first reconnaissance flight of the day. Overhead a pair of A6M Zero fighters from a nearby carrier head out on patrol. Lying peacefully in the harbour a pair of cruisers prepare to sail. It is October, 1942.

STING OF THE BLACK TULIP by Robert Taylor


A WELCOME AT THE INN by Nicolas Trudgian

A limited Edition print of 600 signed and numbered copies commemorating all the U.S.A.A.F. Bomber Crews who flew in Europe in World War 2. A wonderfully nostalgic rendering of B-17s returning over a Suffolk village on that memorable Christmas Eve. His painting will bring back nostalgic memories to thousands of American servicemen who spent Christmas away from home, so long ago.

THE GREATEST DAY - BATTLE OF BRITAIN TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN TRIBUTE EDITION with TWENTY-EIGHT SIGNATURES & ORIGINAL PENCIL DRAWING

For the serious enthusiast this edition represents the ultimate in aviation art and historic autograph collecting.

Only available with the THE GREATEST DAY. For full details on the main release PLEASE CLICK HERE

RETURN TO DUXFORD by Robert Taylor

Flying low over the picturesque village of Thaxted,in the cold winter of 1944-45, the P-51D Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group return to Duxford after a tiring eight hour escort mission. With dusk approaching, low on fuel, the fighters have about 20 miles to run. Catching the festive mood, the pilots have dropped to tree-top height to take in the spectacular countryside as they scurry back to base and some well-earned celebrations.

SIGH OF THE MERLIN by Robert Taylor


ONE-TENS OVER KENT by Nicolas Trudgian

Messerschmitt Me110's and 109's of the Luftwaffe's 210 Gruppe based at Calais-Marck in northern France, make a low-level run across the Kent countryside after a surprise attack on R.A.F. Biggin Hill, August 30, 1940

THRESHING PARTY by Nicolas Trudgian

Farmworkers peacefully threshing the harvest in Kent, south-east England, during the long hot summer of 1940, unaware of approaching enemy raiders. For these country folk the war could be a thousand miles away.

FIGHTING TIGERS by Robert Taylor

On August 5, 1944, following a successful attack on Japanese forces just north of Changsha, P-40 Warhawks of the75th and 16th Fighter Squadrons, 23rd F.G., are attacked by enemy Nakajima fighters and a massive dog-fight has developed over the Hsiang Chiang river with aircraft wheeling and turning in all directions. The action is set against the distinctive, haunting landscape of Southern China, Robert's panoramic canvas capturing all the atmosphere of a crucial aerial campaign fought in the skies above a distant land so many years ago.

FLIGHT OUT OF HELL by Nicolas Trudgian

On February 15, 1944, a force of B-24s, B-25s and A-20s hammered the heavily defended Japanese base at Kavieng. Several aircraft, however, were forced to ditch; three downed B-25 crews from 345th Bomb Group floating helplessly in life-rafts within a thousand yards of the beach, and the Japanese troops were in no mood to take prisoners. Their only chance of survival was the air-sea rescue PBY Catalina. Nicolas Trudgian's dramatic reconstruction depicts Lt. Commander Nathan Gordon's PBY Catalina making its final take-off, the intense enemy gunfire from the shore making his mission seemingly impossible. But the young pilot got all 25 men aboard safely home, and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for what is one of the bravest actions of the war in the Pacific

THE CHANNEL DASH by Robert Taylor

Messershmitt Me109's of JG-2 fly close escort as the German capital ships Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen, accompanied by a naval flotilla, round the tip of the Cherbourg Peninsula at dawn, February 12th 1942.

BREACHING THE DAMS by Nicolas Trudgian


ROBERT TAYLOR DAMBUSTERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Robert Taylor


THE DAMBUSTERS - THREE GOOD BOUNCES (detail) by Robert Taylor

Detail taken from THE DAMBUSTERS – THREE GOOD BOUNCES by Robert Taylor

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

HEIGHT OF THE BATTLE by Robert Taylor

By mid-afternoon on Wednesday 11th September, 1940 German bomber formations were plotted flying up the Thames Estuary towards London. To deal with the imminent raid Fighter Command scrambled nine squadrons to make the intercept. As the Luftwaffe bombers approached the docklands east of London, sixty Spitfires and Hurricanes fell upon them and a pitched battle ensued. Leading No. 74 'Tiger' Squadron, 'Sailor' Malan, ignored the fighter cover and tackled the bombers, the Spitfires ripping into the Heinkel IIIs in an effective beam attack. Having made one diving attack and zoomed back above the raiding Heinkel IIIs, the fighters peel off for a second attack, Malan already winging over with Stephen on his heels. Below Hurricane Mark Is of 17 and 56 Squadrons have joined the turbulent fray.

BATTLE OF THE CORAL SEA by Robert Taylor

Commemorating the Battle of the Coral Sea Robert Taylor has chosen to portray the sinking of the Shoho in this dramatic painting. When Commander Weldon Hamilton, leading one of the Lexington's Dauntless squadrons, spotted the Shoho at 1040 on the morning of May 4th 1942, the Japanese carrier's fate was sealed. Within minutes she was hit by the full force of the Lexington's dive bombers and torpedo aircraft, aided by the Yorktown's attack group. Smothered by a dozen bomb and seven torpedo hits, she was sunk within thirty minutes of the first sighting.

EVE OF DESTINY - THE MASTERWORK DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Paratroopers of the US 101st Airborne Division prepare to board Douglas C-47s at Upottery Airfield on the eve of D-Day. Shortly after 22.00hrs they will set course for Normandy and, after crossing the French coast under heavy AA fire, drop behind Utah Beach to seize key objectives just hours before the largest seaborne invasion in history.

EVE OF DESTINY - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

Issued with the Tribute Edition or EVE OF DESTINY

GUNFIGHT OVER RABAUL by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian's action packed painting shows an attack on Rabaul during the fall of 1943. B-24 Liberators of the Army Air Force pound the harbor and docks below whilst the Marines Corps pilots of VMF 214 - the famous Black Sheep Squadron - provide top cover in their F4U Corsairs. A fierce dog-fight has developed between the F4U pilots and Japanese Zeros. One Zero, already smoking, begins to roll out of control, while the two F4U pilots turn their attentions on to a second. Below further dog-fights are in progress, the air filled with aerial combat.

AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS of ROBERT TAYLOR VOLUME THREE by Robert Taylor

‘Mr. Taylor’s oil paintings and pencil drawings elude a lyrical and majestic quality.’ The Washington Post ‘Thank you, dear Robert, for giving us such profound moving impressions of the air war some fifty years ago, and through them bringing together in friendship airman who, erstwhile, were bitter foes’ Group Captain PETER TOWNSEND Reviewing a major exhibition of his paintings at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, The Washington Post said: ‘Mr. Taylor’s oil paintings and pencil drawings elude a lyrical and majestic quality.’ It was a perceptive comment, defining concisely what it is about this artist’s work that attracts so many. His devotees include the British Royal Family, a former American President, legendary pilots and aircrews, aviation and naval museums, and a host of aviation enthusiasts from every continent. Following the outstanding popularity of his previous two volumes, this third collection of air combat paintings will delight Robert Taylor's many followers around the world. Twenty-eight full colour reproductions of his works painted between 1991 and 1996.

TYPHOONS AT FALAISE by Nicolas Trudgian

It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. Already the German Panzer Divisions are in full retreat, and it is critical to halt them before they can regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. Nicolas Trudgian captures this historic battle in dramatic fashion. Typhoons of 198 Squadron RAF, deliver their deadly rocket and cannon fire, a tank column has been brought to a standstill, their reign of terror now almost at its end.

AGAINST ALL ODDS by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's painting protrays the renowned defiance of the U-Boat crews. Caught on the surface by a PBY Catalina the gun crews of a type VIIc U-Boat are quickly into action. The 3.7cm anti-aircraft gun is hurriedly reloaded while on the upper platform the two 2cm anti-aircraft twins take chunks out of the Catalina's tail - enough damage to secure a respite from the attack. Soon they will dive to relative safety beneath the Atlantic swell.

EARLY MORNING ARRIVAL by Robert Watts

In the history of civilian aviation there are few aircraft which have caught the attention and imagination of enthusiasts in the way the Constellation has. It was a graceful, powerful airplane that looked the part, and today is remembered as one of the world’s great airliners. Robert Watts captures the romance of that golden era of passenger flight in his nostalgic painting of a L-049 Constellation. Seen in American Airlines colors, a ‘Connie’ descends over London in the soft early morning light after an overnight flight from New York.

INTO BATTLE by Robert Taylor

Piling out of their C-47 Dakotas, US Paratroopers descend into the Drop Zone inland from Utah Beach, D-Day, 6th June, 1944.

ANTHONY SAUNDERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

Robert Taylor Double Remarque by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

THE EASTERN FRONT MATTED TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

ONLY ISSUED WITH KNIGHT OF THE REICH

With almost 2400 victories between the FIFTEEN signatories, this edition uniquely includes the three top Aces of all time - Erich Hartmann, Gerhard Barkhorn and Günther Rall - all together on one historic piece.

With all the components of the Eastern Front Edition the Tributes are issued with an outstanding original pencil drawing individually created by Robert Taylor and signed by six high-scoring Aces who flew over Russia. Each drawing is conservation matted to include the original signatures of six more iconic Fighter Aces who flew on the Eastern Front.

TARGET AMIENS PRISON by Robert Taylor

On the 18th February, 1944, a group of brave young aircrew undertook one of the most daring low-level precision bombing operations ever mounted during World War II – the breaching of the wall of Amiens Prison to release members of the French Resistance, condemned to death for their action in helping the Allies. After pleas from the French Resistance, a formation of RAF Mosquitoes from 487 Squadron (New Zealand) and 464 Squadron (Australian), under the overall command of Group Captain Pickard undertook the daring and dangerous mission. Their task was to break open prison walls in order that the patriots could have a chance to escape; it was their last and only chance to live. The raid was a success. The walls were breached and the cell doors sprung by the bomb blasts allowing over 150 prisoners to flee the jail across the snow to be spirited away by the Resistance.

FINE TUNING - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Richard Taylor

This outstanding FIVE signature edition is issued with a highly prized ORIGINAL pencil drawing individually created by Richard Taylor.

SIMON SMITH REMARQUE by Simon Smith


SIMON SMITH REMARQUE by Simon Smith


JAMES MAGGIE MEGELLAS by


JAMES MAGGIE MEGELLAS by


SIMON SMITH REMARQUE by Simon Smith


COMBAT OVER BEACHY HEAD by Nicolas Trudgian

Mickey Mount, flying his 602 Squadron MkII Spitfire, successfully attacks a Messerschmitt Me109 low over the cliffs of Beachy Head on the south coast during the Battle of Britain in the summer of 1940. Spitfires and Me109s were so evenly matched at this early point in the war that the outcome of such contests were usually decided by the skill of the competing pilots.

SQUADRON SCRAMBLE by Nicolas Trudgian

Hurricanes of 43 Squadron scramble from an airfield in southern England during the height of the Battle of Britain, 1940. The R.A.F.'s first 300mph fighter, the Hurricane proved itself a formidable aerial gun platform, its pilots accounting for four-fifth of all the air victories achieved by the R.A.F. during the Battle of Britain.

COMBAT OVER NEW GUINEA by Nicolas Trudgian

Australian Ace Dick Cresswell tangles with a Japanese Zero in the humid air of the tropics over New Guinea during an encounter in 1942. Flying a P-40E Kittyhawk with the insignia of 77 Squadron, RAAF blazoned on his aircraft, Cresswell makes a head-on pass leaving the enemy aircraft streaming smoke. Immortalised by the Flying Tigers, the P-40 was a fine combat aircraft that operated in the Pacific, European and Middle East theaters.

KIWI STRIKE by Nicolas Trudgian

A dramatic low-level attack on a Japanese base near Rabaul is in progress by F-4U Corsairs of 16 Squadron, RNZAF. Taking the lead is Bryan Cox, as the Corsairs leave a trail of smoke and debris in their wake. Water vapor is squeezed out of the humid atmosphere as Cox's wingman banks sharply to avoid groundfire. The Kiwi Corsairs buccaneered their way through the intensly fought campaigns in the Solomons and Guadalcanal.

INVASION FORCE by Nicolas Trudgian

Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time.

BLACK CAT RESCUE by Nicolas Trudgian

On February 15, 1944, flying his Navy PBY Catalina on air-sea rescue duty, Lt. Nathan Gordon received an urgent call. Several 345th BG B25s were down following a major attack on Kavieng, and crews were in the water just offshore. Under intense gunfire, Gordon made no fewer than four perilous water landings to pick up survivors, returning to make an emergency landing at Cape Gloucester with 25 people aboard, an just 10 gallons of fuel in his tanks. Gordon was awarded the Medal of Honor.

MYNARSKI'S LANCASTER by Nicolas Trudgian

Lancaster V-RA, with its young Canadian crew, flew just a handful of operations. On the night of June 12, 1944, it was set afire by a JU88, forcing the crew to bale out. Seeing the rear gunner trapped Pilot Officer Andrew Mynarski vainly braved the inferno to help, losing his parachute to the flames. He was forced to jump without it. Miraculously the burning Lancaster pancaked, and the rear gunner survived. Andrew Mynarski was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously. Mynarski's Lancaster is depicted setting out on that fateful night.

TRAINBUSTERS by Nicolas Trudgian

So versatile was the Mosquito that is performed in every role allotted to the R.A.F. and R.C.A.F. during World War II. Made almost entirely of wood, and powered by two hefty Merlin engines, it was the fastest piston engined aircraft of the war. Seen in its intruder configuration, Mosquitos of 418 Squadron, R.C.A.F. led by Charlie Krause, make a devastating high speed low-level attack on railroad marshalling yards in northern France during the winter of 1944

AIR APACHES ON THE WARPATH by Robert Taylor

B-25 Mitchells from the 345th Bomb Group 'The Air Apaches' attack the Japanese Subchaser #39 off the tip of New Hanover Island, February, 1944. With the air full of tracer and flying shrapnel, a B-25 from the 500th squadron, 'Rita's Wagon', completes her run over the target. Having raked the ship with machine-gun fire, her bomb explodes near the stern, damaging the steering gear. Following closely behind, the next assault is about to start as 'Brother Rat' begins her diving attack, which will send the hapless subchaster to her destruction.

TWILIGHT CONQUEST by Nicolas Trudgian

Flying a twilight mission in his P-61 Black Widow on October 24, 1944, Colonel Johnson and his radar operator have picked up a formation of three Fw190s; stealthily closing on their quarry in the gathering dusk, 'O.B.' makes one quick and decisive strike, bringing down the enemy leader with two short bursts of fire. Banking hard, as the Fw190 pilot prepares to bale out, he brings his blazing guns to bear on a second Fw190, the tracer lighting up the fuselage of his P-61.

WE TREATED THEM ALL THE SAME - MATTED TRIBUTE EDITION by Simon Smith


RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richards’s remarques are extremely popular and already his first few releases are close to being sold out. His use of the pencil is quite superb and since being launched as a professional artist he has developed this to such a level that he is able to create remarques that are masterpieces in their own right. They are quite simply amongst the best to be found anywhere in the industry

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

VICTORY FLYOVER by Robert Taylor


UNSCHEDULED ARRIVAL MATTED REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

The remarqued edition of Unscheduled Arrival - please see main edition for details

Robert Taylor Double Remarque by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Double Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Double Remarque by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Double Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

HELL HAWKS OVER UTAH TRIBUTE DRAWING by Robert Taylor


BOMB AWAY! THE PUBLISHERS PROOF by Robert Taylor

PLEASE SEE THE MAIN EDITION OF BOMB AWAY! FOR FURTHER DETAILS

BOMB AWAY! THE STUDIO PROOFS by Robert Taylor

PLEASE SEE THE MAIN EDITION OF BOMB AWAY! FOR FURTHER DETAILS

PLANS AND PREPARATIONS by Robert Taylor

Pilots and ground crew of the 365th Fighter Group - the Hell Hawks - work tirelessly to keep their P-47 Thunderbolts prepared and ready for action during the crucial weeks following D-Day, June 1944. The unit's air support was vital to the Allied armies battling to secure the Normandy bridgehead and beyond.

This is the companion issued with the Collectors Editions of Hell Hawks Over Utah and not available individually.

Please see the main edition for more information

BOMBER FORCE by Nicolas Trudgian

The tension is electric; slowly they climb to circle the airfield while the entire squadron gets airborne. Below, the countryside reverberates with the sound of roaring Merlin engines. Nicolas Trudgian recreates the familiar scene in a stirring painting which captures all the awesome reality of the mass take-off by RAF Lancaster bombers of 617 Squadron.

ANTHONY SAUNDERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

Anthony Saunders Remarque by Anthony Saunders

A typical Remarque from Anthony Saunders.

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OVERLORD - D-DAY AND THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY SPECIAL by The Military Gallery


THE 70th ANNIVERSARY EDITION BOOK by The Military Gallery


ASSAULT ON OMAHA BEACH - matted D-Day Tribute Edition by Simon Smith

ISSUED WITH THE D-DAY TRIBUTE EDITION OF ASSAULT ON OMAHA BEACH - NOT AVAILABLE INDIVIDUALLY

With all the components of the 70th Anniversary Edition, each set is accompanied by a unique ORIGINAL pencil drawing specially created for this release by artist Simon Smith.

Anthony Saunders Remarque by Anthony Saunders

A typical Remarque from Anthony Saunders.

Anthony Saunders Double Remarque by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

LAST MAN HOME by Nicolas Trudgian

In a scene that was repeated almost daily throughout the long war years, the pilots of the 357th Fighter Group have returned from a gruelling mission to their base in Leiston, Suffolk. As they clamber out of their aircraft, all eyes are turned anxiously skyward, awaiting the return of the last man home.

THE LAST BRITISH DAMBUSTER by George Johnson by The Military Gallery

For the first time, ‘Johnny’ Johnson – Britain’s last surviving Dambuster and one of the very few men who can recall first-hand the most daring and ingenious air raid of all time – relives the fateful night of 16 / 17 May 1943. He recalls with unique wit and insight the difficult training conducted in secrecy, the race against time to release the bombs, and the sheer strength and bravery shown by a small unit faced with great adversity and uncertainty. Embodying a whole squadron, and leaving a lasting legacy for generations to come, 'Johnny’s' story is like no other.

MIDWINTER DAWN - TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

ONLY AVAILABLE WITH THE TRIBUTE EDITION OF MIDWINTER DAWN - PLEASE SEE MAIN EDITION FOR MORE DETAILS

With all the signatures of the Canadian Edition, each print in this stunning FIFTEEN SIGNATURE Tribute Edition is issued with a highly collectible original pencil drawing by Robert Taylor. For the first time in an edition Robert will individual create each drawing on buff paper in a combination of graphite with coloured highlights in paint, creating a stunning 'sepia' effect piece.

Anthony Saunders Remarque by Anthony Saunders

A typical Remarque from Anthony Saunders

Anthony Saunders Double Remarque by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

LIGHTNING ENCOUNTER by Nicolas Trudgian

P-38 Lightnings launching a surprise attack on a German freight train as it winds its way through the hills in Northern France. Caught by the P-38 pilots as it crosses a viaduct - previously damaged by Resistance saboteurs - the train will be lucky to make its destination. Already some of the wagons are on fire, the locomotive has taken some hits, and there are three more Lightnings on the way into the attack

DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

A typical Double Remarque from Anthony Saunders

LAST OF THE 39-ERS by

The Extraordinary Wartime Experiences of Squadron Leader Alfie Fripp THIS OUTSTANDING BOOK IS ISSUED WITH THE PRINT SAGAN - THE GREAT ESCAPE BY RICHARD TAYLOR

LAST OF THE 39-ERS by

The Extraordinary Wartime Experiences of Squadron Leader Alfie Fripp THIS OUTSTANDING BOOK IS ISSUED WITH THE PRINT SAGAN - THE GREAT ESCAPE BY RICHARD TAYLOR

SAGAN - THE GREAT ESCAPE MATTED DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Already celebrated as one of the greatest exponents of pencil work in the industry Richard has taken his remarques to another level and now offers them in colour. He will also accept specific requests to create a very personal drawing.

ESCORT FOR THE STRAGGLER by Robert Taylor

Escorted by Spitfires of 504 Squadron, the battle damaged Lancaster UL-M2 approaches the friendly coast of England after a grueling raid over Germany. Between early 1943 and the end of 1944, the legendary bomber completed 140 operational sorties - more than any other Lancaster in RAF Bomber Command during WWII.

EAGLES OVER THE RHINE by Robert Taylor

P-51 Mustangs of the 353rd Fighter Group make a low level run over towns and villages along the Rhine.

OUT OF FUEL AND SAFELY HOME by Robert Taylor

Damaged by flak and enemy fighters, and almost out of fuel, after a gruelling eight hour mission the pilot of this B-17 Fortress makes a forced landing in the safety of an English cornfield. A pair of P-51 Mustangs have escorted the damaged aircraft back across the North Sea, and peel off as they see their charge safely back on friendly soil.

WIDE HORIZONS by Robert Taylor

A superb study of the legendary P-38 Lightning, this print commemorates the American Air Forces that operated in the European Theater.

RETURN OF THE HUNTERS by Nicolas Trudgian


STEINHOFF TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor

Macky Steinhoff in action over the White Cliffs of Dover. It is August, and the height of the Battle of Britain: Heinkel 111 bombers have attacked airfields and radar stations along the south coast, and a frantic dog-fight has developed as Me109s of JG-52 clash with Hurricanes of the RAF's No. 32 Squadron. Macky's Me109E, which dominates the picture, provides a magnificently detailed study of this superlative fighter, as he and his fellow Luftwaffe pilots do their best to protect the retreating Heinkels. Below is a wonderful panoramic aerial view of Dover Harbour, the legendary White Cliffs, and the carefully researched landscape showing the south-eastern tip of the British Isles as it was in 1940.

VALOR IN THE PACIFIC by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor has painted a magnificent reconstruction of a mission during the final stages of that momentous conflict. Depicted are B-29s of the 499th Bomb Group, 73rd Wing of the 20th Air Force. After a daylight raid on Tokyo, showing all the telltale signs of combat over the target, a Wing of the world's largest and fastest-ever piston-engined bombers make their long over-water journey home, still many hours away at Saipan Island. At the extremity of their range, 'little friends', very-long-range P-51 Mustang escort fighters, peel off and head for home - leaving the mighty bombers to fend for themselves.

RANGERS ON THE RAMPAGE by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's painting dramatically brings to life a Mosquito attack on a German fighter station deep inside Germany. Arriving over the target at little above hangar height, the two-ship mission announce their arrival by raking the field with cannon and machine gun fire. Within seconds both aircraft have scored direct hits with their 50lb bombs, and before the defensive flak guns can get the range, the pair have departed for home.

RICHARD TAYLOR - COLOUR REMARQUE 7 by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUES TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE

RICHARD TAYLOR SUNDERLAND REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

Midway Double Remarque by Anthony Saunders

A typical Double Remarque from Anthony Saunders

HAJO HERRMANN PHOTO by


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DIETER HRABAK PHOTO by


EDUARD NEUMANN PHOTO by


WERNER HOHENBERG PHOTO by


NEVILLE DUKE PHOTO by


JOHNNIE JOHNSON PHOTO by


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SAFE HAVEN by Nicolas Trudgian

B24J Liberators of the 93rd Bomb Group, returning from a raid, safely cross the English coast above a tranquil Suffolk estuary. Beneath, an air-sea rescue amphibian prepares to disembark airman, rescued earlier following ditching in the North Sea

SPIRIT OF THE MOUNTAIN by Nicolas Trudgian

The evening train from Durango has arrived via Lizard Head Pass, and now pulls out of Ophir, headed for Ridgway. Lit by a full moon, the evening quiet of the tiny mountain settlement is briefly interrupted by the C16 class locomotive, but soon, as it winds its way into the night, peace will again descend upon this idyllic and mystical scene.

CANYON OF LOST SOULS by Nicolas Trudgian

High above the Animas river in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, the daily passenger train bringing passengers from Silverton to Durango, negotiates the precarious 'High Line' shelf. Over 400 feet below, the fast-flowing mountain waters thunder through the canyon.

ANTHONY SAUNDERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

A typical Remarque from Anthony Saunders

WINGS OF GLORY 2014 CALENDAR 2 by The Military Gallery

The Military Gallery introduces the exciting Wings of Glory calendar for 2014. With each month displaying one of twelve stunning images, carefully selected from our unparalleled archive of air combat paintings, our new calendar uniquely includes an account of many significant dates of WWII, making these invaluable to the Aviation and Military devotee.

WINGS OF GLORY 2014 CALENDAR 3 by The Military Gallery

The Military Gallery introduces the exciting Wings of Glory calendar for 2014. With each month displaying one of twelve stunning images, carefully selected from our unparalleled archive of air combat paintings, our new calendar uniquely includes an account of many significant dates of WWII, making these invaluable to the Aviation and Military devotee.

SCRAMBLE FOR THE MARIANAS by Nicolas Trudgian

On June 19, 1944 American Navy pilots ripped into wave after wave of enemy aircraft. As each new onslaught arrived there were more fighters there to meet them. Other squadrons joined in the melee and the radio circuits crackled with shouts and cries of encouragement. "Hell this is like an old time turkey shoot!" yelled one pilot - and thus the battle became known as the Great Marianas Turkey Shoot. By the late afternoon two Japanese carriers had been sunk by submarines, and an incredible 373 enemy planes shot down. The U.S. Navy pilots had won an historic victory. Seen hurtling off the deck of the U.S.S. Lexington is the F6F Hellcat of Lt. Alex Vraciu of Fighting Squadron VF-16. With 12 victories already to his credit, Vraciu would add a further 6 to his tally in the space of just 8 minutes on that momentous day.

COMING IN OVER THE ESTUARY by Robert Taylor

In Robert Taylor's panoramic painting, P-38J Lightnings of the 364th Fighter Group return from a strafing mission over France in the summer of 1944. Making their land-fall at just 100 feet, they skim across an estuary on England's south coast, near the old village of Bosham. With his unmistakable skill and vivid imagination Robert cleverly contrasts the exhilaration of the low-level combat flying, with the peaceful atmosphere of a quiet coastal setting, emphasising that curious blend of war and peace that was the daily lifestyle of the World War II flyer. This classic aviation painting provides collectors with a wonderful study of a memorable warbird.

Remarque drawing by Robert Taylor


THE STUFF OF LEGEND - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Robert Taylor


TIGER ATTACK - THE COMPANION DRAWING by Robert Taylor


THE STUFF OF LEGEND - MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Robert Taylor

This rare - and historic - THIRTEEN signature tribute to the Flying Tigers is released with all the elements of the Collectors Edition but, in addition, every print is accompanied by an ORIGINAL pencil drawing individually created for this edition by Robert Taylor, the world’s premier aviation artist.

TIGER ATTACK - THE COMPANION DRAWING by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s magnificent Masterwork drawing portrays the Flying Tigers engaging Japanese fighters high over the mountains of western China.

TIGER ATTACK - THE COMPANION DRAWING by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s magnificent Masterwork drawing portrays the Flying Tigers engaging Japanese fighters high over the mountains of western China.

THE BRIDGE AT REMAGEN by Robert Taylor


TO HELL AND BACK - THE REMARQUES by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

ANTHONY SAUNDERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

ON COURSE FOR THE MÖHNE DAM - TRIBUTE EDITION by Richard Taylor

The six signature Tribute Edition is issued with a stunning ORIGINAL pencil drawing created by Richard Taylor especially to mark the 70th Anniversary of the Dambuster Raid.

TANGMERE HURRICANES by Nicolas Trudgian

MK1 Hurricanes of No. 601 Squadron refueled and rearmed, climb to rejoin the battle during the summer of 1940. As the great air battle rages high above, life goes in the countryside as a Southern Railway train pulls out of a local village station, capturing the resilient mood of the people.

D-DAY THE AIRBORNE ASSAULT by Robert Taylor

“With his unrivalled flair and talent Robert Taylor's superb image is one of the most iconic portrayals of the D-Day airborne assault of all time….”

It began shortly after midnight on 6 June 1944 when two American and one British Airborne Division started to drop en-masse into Normandy. Their mission: to secure the flanks for the mighty amphibious armada heading towards the invasion beaches. As dawn broke to reveal the bullet-swept beaches below, overhead the skies were still filled with troop-carrying aircraft towing gliders heading for the drop zones.

Robert Taylor’s iconic masterpiece D-Day - The Airborne Assault has been hailed by many leading veterans as the most realistic portrayal of D-Day air events rendered by any artist. Seen crossing a section of the invasion beaches, and closely escorted by P- 51Bs of the 354th Fighter Group, C-47s of the 438th TCG tow CG-4 Waco gliders bringing in yet more reinforcements for the 82nd Airborne Division.

AFTER THE BATTLE by Robert Taylor

A flight of Spitfire MK IX's, generally considered to have been the greatest of all the Spitfire marks, return to their base at R.A.F. Kenley in July 1942. High on adrenalin after a dog-fight with German Fw190's over France, the 611 Squadron pilots make the high speed run for home above the distinctive patchwork fields of southern England.

NIGHT ATTACK by Robert Taylor

The companion print to STRIKE AND RETURN

LAST MOMENTS OF THE MÖHNE DAM - CHASTISE TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor


DAMBUSTER REMARQUE by Robert Taylor


Bud Anderson by


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Clyde East by


Jim Brooks by


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Steve Pisanos by


Clinton Burdick by


Kit Carson by


Tommy Hayes by


Bob Curtis by


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Robin Olds by


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ADVANCE INTO EUROPE by Nicolas Trudgian


NORMANDY FIGHTER SWEEP by Nicolas Trudgian

Johnnie Johnson leads his Canadian Wing Spitfires over the Normandy beaches on D-Day, 1944

HARTMANN TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor


FLAGSHIP OVER MANHATTAN by Robert Watts

Robert Watts’ fine rendering depicts an American Airlines DC-3 – one of 20 in service by 1936 with right-hand doors – outbound from La Guardia airport. Below, the distinctive Manhattan skyline and the busy New York waterfront add to the nostalgic mood of this pre-war aviation scene. Perhaps the greatest tribute to this remarkable aircraft is the fact that after almost 60 years of unbroken service, the distinctive shape and sound of the DC-3 can still be seen in the skies all around the world, performing the role for which it was built – flying passengers and cargo safely and profitably.

Dambusters Lancaster Remarque by Anthony Saunders


THE LONG SHORT DAYS - MATTED TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor Remarque by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor


Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

BLACKBIRD by Richard Taylor

Richard’s superb drawing depicts the incredible SR-71 ‘Blackbird’ during one of its long-range reconnaissance missions as it soars high over the mountains below. Widely regarded as the leading pencil artist in the industry, Richard’s drawing is a lasting tribute to this very special aircraft that holds several world records for being the fastest and highest flying manned aircraft for sustained flight.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

DAY OF THE FIGHTERS by Nicolas Trudgian


TIGER FIRE by Nicolas Trudgian


MARAUDER MISSION by Robert Taylor

B26 Marauders of the 386th Bomb Group 9th Air Force, returning from a strike against VI, rocket sites in the Pas de Calais, January 1944. The 9th Air Force became one of the most effective forces in the destruction of VI rocket sites, railroad yards, bridges and other enemy position in northern France and by May 1944, was despatching more than one thousand aircraft a day against targets in Normandy and the Pas de Calais.

THUNDERBOLT STRIKE by Robert Taylor

A flight of P47 thunderbolts of the 404 Fighter group, 9th Air force, clear the target area after a low-level attack on the airfield inland from Havre, Normandy, 1944. Tracer winds up towards them from ground defences and almost all the aircraft have taken hits. Ground-attack pilots went in low, did the job and got our fast!

EAGLES ON THE RAMPAGE - EAGLES EDITION by Robert Taylor


EAGLES ON THE RAMPAGE - EAGLES TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor


RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the world's most collected aviation artists and is widely regarded as the best pencil artist in the industry. His superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become valued collectors’ pieces.

Ed Saylor by


TOM GRIFFIN PHOTO by


DICK COLE by


David Thatcher by


Ed Saylor by


George Maynor by


Everett Holstrom by


Howard Sessler by


Royden Stork by


Griffith Williams by


USS HORNET by Richard Taylor

The aircraft carrier USS Hornet heads through the heavy swell of the Pacific in April 1942. A short time later B-25’s of the legendary Doolittle Raiders will launch from the Leaving deck of this mighty ship - destination Tokyo!

OUT OF THE DRAGONS DEN - MATTED TRIBUTE by Richard Taylor

The matted pencil drawing which accompanies the tribute edition of OUT OF THE DRAGONS DEN

WINTER PATROL by Nicolas Trudgian


FLYING CLOUD by Robert Taylor

The American Clipper Flying Cloud arrives at Hong Kong in May 1860, 97 days out of London. En-route to Foochow, she will load tea for the return voyage. Of all the famous American Clippers Flying Cloud had by far the best record.

SPITFIRE CLIPPER by Robert Taylor

Tea, carried down the Min River from the plantations on Chinese junks, is loaded aboard the Spitfire in Pagoda Anchorage, Foochow, October, 1857. A steam tug approaches, indicating the clipper is almost ready to sail for London, a voyage she will complete in 113 days.

HUNTING PARTY by Robert Watts

The frosty morning air is shattered by a ‘hunting party’ of F-86 Sabres of the U.S. 51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing, as they blast off the runway at Kimpo airfield, South Korea. Led by Gabby Gabreski, they are headed north to the Yalu River, and Mig Alley.

Buck Compton by


Don Malarkey by


Forest Guth by


Actor Damian Lewis by


Bill Guarnere and Damian Lewis signing Advance from Utah by


Bill Guarnere by


THE EASY COMPANY TRIBUTE EDITION by Simon Smith by Simon Smith

ISSUED WITH THE TRIBUTE EDITION OF ADVANCE FROM UTAH BY SIMON SMITH, NOT AVAILABLE INDIVIDUALLY. SEE MAIN EDITION FOR MORE DETAILS

REMARQUE DRAWING by Simon Smith by Simon Smith


Earl McLung by


WINTERS WELCOME by Robert Taylor

There were few sights more stirring than a B-17 Fortress on its final approach returning from a combat mission. The co-pilot, clearly visible, assists his captain with the landing - the aircraft has taken some damage from fighters and is a handful on the approach. With wheels and flaps down, engines throttled back, the skipper eases the big machine gently down the glidepath towards touchdown, amidst the peaceful countryside of East Anglia.

In a few moments the last crews will be safely down as the English winter landscape welcomes home another crew.

MUSTANGS OVER THE MEDITERRANEAN by Nicolas Trudgian

The 31st Fighter Group transferred to the 15th Air Force in April 1944. Re-equipped with P-51 Mustangs, they flew fighter escort duties from bases in Italy, and were heavily engaged in the Allies final offensive in Northern Italy. The 31st Fighter Group served in Europe longer than any other during World War 2.

EAGLES OUT OF THE SUN by Robert Taylor


FLYING THE JOLLY ROGER by Robert Watts

A pair of Navy F-4 Phantoms of VF84 The Jolly Rogers prepare to recover aboard the carrier U.S.S. Independence. A beautifully proportioned painting by one of the most accomplished American aviation artists, provides a spectacular view of the legendary Phantom. Seen against a beautiful Yankee Station sundown, an element of F-4s decelerate in preparation for deck landing, following a combat mission in 1965.

Group Captain JAMES TAIT by


Remarque drawing by Robert Taylor


TOWARDS NIGHT'S DARKNESS - VICTORIA CROSS EDITION by Robert Taylor

As the setting sun casts a golden glow, a group of Lancasters from 576 Squadron form up after departing from their Lincolnshire base at the start of a raid into Germany in late 1944. The lead aircraft UL-I (LM227) was one of only a handful of Lancasters to complete 100 operational sorties.

THE EAGLES DIVIDE MATTED TRIBUTE by Robert Taylor


SEPTEMBER VICTORY by Nicolas Trudgian


PLOESTI - THE VITAL MISSION by Robert Taylor


WOUNDED WARRIOR TRIBUTE EDITION by Richard Taylor

This THIRTEEN signature edition is issued with as part of the Tribute Edition of WOUNDED WARRIOR and comprises a unique and highly prized ORIGINAL pencil drawing by Richard Taylor, which is personally hand signed by one of WWII’s foremost fighter leaders,DON BLAKESLEE. Each drawing is conservation matted to include Museum quality reproduction US Pilots wings and the original pencil signatures of a further five prominent Aces that flew P-51’s in the European Theatre - including the third member of this remarkable story, ‘KIT’CARSON.

DAWN CHORUS by Nicolas Trudgian


image Titanic 02 by


Millvina Dean by


T01 by


T01 by


image Titanic by


by


image Titanic 02 by


TITANIC - THE TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For all collectors’ with an interest in RMS Titanic, and to commemorate the centenary of the Titanic’s first, and last, voyage, the Military Gallery are proud to publish this unique, once-in-a-lifetime, Titanic Tribute Edition. Only THIRTY-FIVE signed and numbered copies of Robert Taylor’s working pencil drawing for Titanic – Last Farewell will be issued.

BOGEY'S ELEVEN O'CLOCK HIGH by Robert Taylor

Doug Canning breaks radio silence to call the sighting of Admiral Yamamoto's flight over the pacific island of Bourganville, 18 April 1943. After a two and a half hour, four hundred mile flight just above the waves, mission leader John Mitchell and his 16 ship raiding party push their P-38s to full power to complete one of the most remarkable ambushes in aviation history.

FAREWELL AMERICA by Robert Taylor

When the QUEEN MARY, most famous of all the transatlantic ocean liners, retired gracefully to a berth at Long Beach, California in 1967, she brought to an end an era of maritime opulence, romance and glittering extravagance never seen before or since. On just her sixth voyage she took the coveted Blue Riband from the French Lines’ NORMANDIE. On the advent of war she was commissioned as a transport and troop ship, able to carry 15,000 American troops at speed up to 30 knots. The war over, the QUEEN MARY resumed her role as the greatest ocean palace. Robert Taylor recreates a scene from the great ship’s illustrious past, as she sails from New York for Europe in the early post-war period. The QUEEN MARY steams majestically past the Statue of Liberty, her bows pointed eagerly towards the Atlantic.

JOLLY ROGERS by Nicolas Trudgian


ACES ON THE WESTERN FRONT by Robert Taylor


AIR COMBAT LEGENDS by Nicolas Trudgian

On a grey, misty November day at my home in the Bavarian mountains, I am gazing at Nicolas Trudgian’s paintings. They are, at the same time, both beautiful yet awesome in their ability to take the memory back half a century in time. The wonderful interplay of light, shadow and colour, reflecting the ever-fleeting movement of clouds across a clear blue sky, sets the artist’s scene for snapshots of aerial warfare, that unique form of combat which, like the boundless domain in which it is fought, changes its shape with every second that passes. Of the scores of combat aircraft that flew during World War II, many became legends in their day, made memorable by the skill, and heroism of the pilots who flew them. In this superbly illustrated collection Nicolas Trudgian, foremost among the new aviation artists, pays tribute to these legendary aircraft and their pilots. From Guy Gibson leading the daring Dambusters to Adolf Galland blasting off in his revolutionary Me262 jet, each painting reveals a level of resolution and colour that has become the hallmark of this superb artist’s work.

HOME AT DUSK by Robert Taylor


IN GALLANT COMPANY by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s evocative painting, IN GALLANT COMPANY, depicts a nail-biting drama in the Solomons during the great struggle for air supremacy in 1943. Marine Corps F4Fwildcats and F4U Corsairs have fought a bitter air battle. Weary from the contest pilots head back for base. An F4F Wildcat has been raked across its fuselage by gunfire, taking out the radio and puncturing an oil pipe. The pilot is injured but in control, and thus far has been able to maintain speed. His C.O. and wingman have closed in to give support, but with land in sight the F4F has started to trail smoke. From here on in it is courage, determination, and luck that will bring this Marine pilot back to fight another day.

IN DEFENSE OF THE REICH by Nicolas Trudgian


RUSSIAN ROULETTE by Robert Taylor

A Soviet Yak 3 hurtles towards us in a typically daring head-on attack on a Bf109. Other Yaks wheel and turn frantically in search of the enemy. Casualties on both sides are evident. Away into the distant horizon stretches a vast Russian sky, painted in Robert’s inimitable style: soon all will be quiet again until the next ferocious encounter.

THUNDERING HOME by Nicolas Trudgian


GREEN HEART WARRIORS by Nicolas Trudgian


KNIGHTS ON THE EASTERN FRONT by Robert Taylor


DOOLITTLE TOKYO RAIDERS by Robert Taylor


MIDWAY - STRIKE AGAINST THE AKAGI by Robert Taylor


OUTWARD BOUND by Robert Taylor


COMING HOME by Robert Taylor


HUNTERS IN THE DESERT by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's painting records Hans-Joachim Marseille's jubliant low pass as he returns to his Desert airstrip having just achieved his 100th victory. In the foreground his fellow pilots are seen clambering out of their Me109's having just completed another successful mission.

HOT PURSUIT by Nicolas Trudgian


DEFENCE OF THE REALM by Robert Taylor

In the azure skies above London and the south-eastern Shires of England during the long, hot summer of 1940, a small band of RAF fighter pilots, substantially out-numbered, and against all odds, flew and fought a savage aerial battle in defence of the Realm. Their success in repelling the might of the Luftwaffe has become legend. They were Churchill’s FEW. Fresh from the heat of battle after a dog-fight over the city, No. 85 Squadron’s C.O., Peter Townsend, levels off and turns his Hurricane for home to re-fuel, re-arm, and rejoin the fight. A symbolic portrayal paying tribute to the Hawker Hurricane and its legendary pilots who, between them, accounted for four of every five enemy aircraft destroyed during the momentous Battle of Britain.

CLIPPER MORNING STAR by Robert Taylor

Developed by the Boeing Company during World War II from its successful B-29 Super-Fortress to meet the needs fro long range air transport, the Stratocruiser became a symbol of post-war civil aviation. Robert Taylor's nostalgic painting, shows Clipper Morning Star N1042V flying serenly over the distinctive Manhattan skyline in 1952.

HOSTILE SKY by Robert Taylor

A B-24 has been hit and is losing touch with the main bomber formation, as Luftwaffe pilots concentrated their attentions on the unfortunate aircraft. Two Fw190s, are zooming up for the kill on the damaged B-24. Seeing the desperate situation, a P-38 escort pilot has made a head-on attack, splitting the pair of Fw190s, and thwarting their attempt to finish off the B-24. Another P-38, aware of the situation, is turning into the path of the Fw190s, and Robert makes it clear in his dramatic portrayal that the action has some way to go before any conclusion will be reached.

THUNDER IN THE ARDENNES (detail) by Anthony Saunders

Detail taken from THUNDER IN THE ARDENNES by Anthony Saunders

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

THUNDER IN THE ARDENNES (detail) by Anthony Saunders

Detail taken from THUNDER IN THE ARDENNES by Anthony Saunders

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

TARGET PEENEMUNDE by Robert Taylor

Lancasters of No. 83 Squadron Pathfinder Force as they climb out over the east coast of England en-route for Peenemunde on the warm summer evening of 17th August, 1943. Brilliantly navigated in darkness right over the target, the masterbomber’s aircraft, seen in the forefront of Robert Taylor's painting, made nine dangerous passes over the target, directing operations. During the next 55 minutes Hitler’s secret weapon establishment was almost totally destroyed by the bomber crews that followed his directions.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR SINGLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the world's most collected aviation artists and is widely regarded as the best pencil artist in the industry. His superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR SINGLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS of ROBERT TAYLOR VOLUME TWO by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor is widely regarded as the world’s foremost aviation artist. His first book, THE AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS OF ROBERT TAYLOR, published in 1987, became an instant best-seller and has since sold more copies than any aviation art book ever published. The following is a brief selection from the many fine reviews it received: ‘Robert Taylor’s is the finest book of aviation paintings yet published.’ Don Lopez, Deputy Director, National Air and Space Museum, Washington DC. ‘It is superb in its content and a magnificent production… the book will become a family heirloom.’ Group Captain Peter Townsend, CVO,DSO,DFC This second volume of air combat paintings features a collection of Robert Taylor’s work, painted between 1987 and 1990. A number of these great pilots have contributed their own personal recollections, including first-hand accounts of the aircraft they flew in combat. Each of the 24 paintings is reproduced in full colour and discussed within a separate four-page chapter, providing in-depth visual and verbal studies of some of Taylor’s most popular paintings. The artist’s revealing comments are supported by a wealth of colour detail and superb pencil sketches. Taylor’s original paintings are to be found hanging in the Imperial War Museum, the RAF Museum, the Fleet Air Arm Museum, the International Aerospace Hall of Fame, the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum and the Australian War Memorial Museum.

RETURN OF THE BELLE by Robert Taylor

The Memphis Belle returns to Bassingbourne, Cambridgeshire, following a daylight mission, Autumn 1942.

STORMBIRDS OVER THE REICH by Robert Taylor


EAGLES PREY by Robert Taylor


BEACH HEAD STRIKE FORCE by Robert Taylor


CHENNAULT'S FLYING TIGERS by Robert Taylor


Anthony Saunders Remarque by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

SKY GIANT by Robert Taylor

A consolidated PB2Y Coronado, flown by Pan Am flight crews for the Navy Transport Service, at the Marine Terminal mooring, La Guadia, 1943

THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR (detail) by The Military Gallery

Detail taken from THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR (detail) by The Military Gallery

Detail taken from THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR (detail) by The Military Gallery

Detail taken from THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY - 2016 CALENDAR

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

COMBAT OVER LONDON by Robert Taylor

During the legendary Battle of Britain Spitfires of 92 Squadron are engaged with Messerschmitt Me109s of JG-2 in a high-altitude dog-fight directly over London in September 1940. Way below bombers of the Luftwaffe attempt one of their final daylight raids over the capital.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the most collected artists in the industry and the demand for his original work is huge. His pencil work in particular is extremely popular and his superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

Anthony Saunders Remarque by Anthony Saunders

A typical Remarque from Anthony Saunders.

OVERLORD - D-DAY AND THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY by


LONGEST SUMMER (detail) by Anthony Saunders

Detail taken from LONGEST SUMMER by Anthony Saunders

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

THEIR FINEST HOUR - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 1940 by The Military Gallery

For more information on this commemorative limited edition book and print portfolio, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

THEIR FINEST HOUR - THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN 1940 by The Military Gallery

For more information on this commemorative limited edition book and print portfolio, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

HURRICANE ATTACK by Robert Taylor

Issued as the companion print to the RAF edition of HEIGHT OF THE BATTLE and is not available individually.

MAPLE LEAF SCRAMBLE by Robert Taylor

Issued as the companion print to the RCAF edition of HEIGHT OF THE BATTLE and is not available individually.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Remarque Drawing by Robert Taylor

An example of an original pencil Remarque by Robert Taylor, the world's foremost Aviation Artist.

Robert Taylor Double Remarque by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s beautiful, highly-detailed and individually hand-crafted pencil double remarques are not only a delight to the eye, but have become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

THE BLOND KNIGHT – HARTMANN TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For details on the main edition of The Blond Knight PLEASE CLICK HERE.

SUMMER VICTORY by Robert Taylor


HURRICANE FORCE by Robert Taylor


EAGLE ATTACK by Robert Taylor


ZERO ENCOUNTER by Robert Taylor


SEVERN TRAIL by Robert Taylor

A magnificent study of a pair of C130 Hercules seen in tactical trail over the Severn Estuary, 25 miles west of R.A.F. Lyneham, headquarters base of RAF Support Command

RETURN FROM SCHWEINFURT by Robert Taylor


ST. CROIX SUR MER by Robert Taylor


STUKA by Robert Taylor

The Stuka when dressed for war was an awesome spectacle. Robert Taylor's outstanding painting show's a formation of JU87s bombed up and fitted with long range tanks heading out on a shipping strike over the Mediterranean in 1941. Following its success in the Polish and French 'Blitzkrieg' campaigns, the Stuka was seen by the German High Command as the supreme new weapon to succeed long range artillery. With its banshee-like wailing siren the Stuka pilots would deliver destruction from the skies and create a devastating psychological effect upon all those below.

GATHERING STORM by Robert Taylor


HOME RUN by Robert Taylor


RICHARD TAYLOR SINGLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the world's most collected aviation artists and is widely regarded as the best pencil artist in the industry. His superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become valued collectors’ pieces.

RICHARD TAYLOR - DOUBLE REMARQUE 6 by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the world's most collected aviation artists and is widely regarded as the best pencil artist in the industry. His superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become valued collectors’ pieces.

KNIGHTS CROSS by Robert Taylor


RICHARD TAYLOR - DOUBLE REMARQUE 5 by Richard Taylor


BARQUE GLENOGIL by Robert Taylor

The four-masted barque Glenogil passes Liverpool pierhead as she is towed up the Mersey. Paddle steamers in the foreground are seen embarking passengers for the river crossing in this busy harbour scene.

LOCH ETIVE ON THE FIRTH by Robert Taylor

The windjammer Loch Etive departs Glasgow on October 15, 1892, bound for Sydney, Australia. After a round-trip lasting six and a half months, she will return to London with a cargo of wool. Looking across the Firth towards Glasgow the waters are busy with coastal craft.

BADER'S BUS COMPANY by Robert Taylor

High over the south coast of England, the defiant Spitfire pilots of Douglas Bader’s Tangmere Wing fly a southerly course towards the Pas de Calais to engage Adolf Galland’s ‘Abbeville Boys’ shortly after their indomitable leader had been shot down and taken prisoner, August 1941.

HELPING HAND by Robert Taylor


CANBERRAS OVER CAMBRIDGESHIRE by Robert Taylor

Undeterred by 'Friday 13th', Wing Commander Beamont took off that day in May 1949, in the Canberra prototype. So accomplished was this new jet bomber that by the end of the 1950's, no fewer than 41 R.A.F. Squadrons were equipped with the Canberra, and the training of crews in another 16 countries had begun. Robert Taylor's painting, shows the aircraft during a formation training sortie; rushing over the fenlands of Cambridgeshire, England, preparing to land at its R.A.F. Wyton base.

OFFSHORE BOMBARDMENT by Robert Taylor

The Prinz Eugen, one of the finest and most famous ships in the German Navy, shelling Russian shore positions in Western Samland, the Baltic, January 1945 Earlier in the war The Prinz Eugen took part in the sinking of H.M.S. Hood and later the Channel Dash.

ZEMKE'S WOLFPACK by Robert Taylor


KNIGHT'S CROSS by Robert Taylor


MIDWAY TURNING OF THE TIDE by Robert Taylor


CLOUD COMPANIONS by Robert Taylor

A Lancaster has been damaged and is left far behind the main force to make its own perilous way home as best it can. Seeing the vulnerability of their friends, a Mosquito crew expose themselves to the same dangers, and throttle back to stay alongside the injured warbird. Dawn has broken, the visibility is unlimited. They have yet to make that Channel crossing and enemy fighters are in the area. The crew of the Lancaster struggle to maintain flying speed and enough height to bring their large four-engined aircraft home. Perhaps tonight they will all drink and laugh in the local pub - perhaps!

LOW HOLDING by Robert Taylor


EAGLES HIGH by Robert Taylor


DAWN PATROL by Robert Taylor

Billy Bishop and the pilots of 85 Squadron as they climb their SE5A fighters into the cool morning sunlight above the fields of Northern France on June 16, 1918. A superb scene from the First World War.

ACE OF ACES by Robert Taylor


EARLY MORNING ARRIVAL by Robert Taylor


SWANSONG by Robert Taylor


BROKEN SILENCE by Robert Taylor


DESERT HAWKS by Robert Taylor

A flight of Kittyhawks of No. 3 Squadron Royal Australian Air Force on a strike mission over the North African Desert in January 1942, in the build-p to the Battle of Alamein. No. 3 Squadron RAAF was the first in the Desert to achieve 100 confirmed victories, and continuing in combat throughout the fighting in North Africa, became the Squadron with the highest number of air victories of the Desert Air Force Squadrons.

LIMITLESS HORIZONS by Robert Taylor

Passengers board a Pan Am Clipper at Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay in 1940. The mighty Boeing 314, considered the best flying boat ever built, is bound for Hawaii and the Far East. In December 1941, Captain Ford and his 10 main crew covered 31,500 miles to virtually circumnavigate the globe in a Boeing B-314 flying boat. It was the first round-the-world flight made by a commercial plane, and the longest continuous trip ever made by a commercial plane.

COAST IN SIGHT TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

THE BOMBER COMMAND TRIBUTE EDITION Please see the main edition COAST IN SIGHT for full details.

SE5A by Robert Taylor

SE5A Scouts of 85 Squadron leaving their airfield at St. Omer, France, June 1918. The SE5A was one of the finest of all World War One fighters, and was flown by most of the war's top-scoring pilots.

CONCORDE FORMATION by Robert Taylor


HORNBLOWER AND THE ATROPOS by Robert Taylor


STRAGGLER RETURNS by Robert Taylor


ATLANTIC WOLVES by Robert Taylor


FOURTH FIGHTER PATROL by Robert Taylor


WELCOME SIGHT by Robert Taylor


MISSION COMPLETED by Robert Taylor

Battle-torn B-17 Flying Fortresses of the US Eighth Air Force make their final approach following a gruelling raid over Germany. Having taken a pounding by enemy fighters, the weary crews descend into the welcome tranquillity of the English countryside.

JV44 by Robert Taylor


HURRICANE SCRAMBLE by Robert Taylor


LIGHTNING STRIKE by Robert Taylor


JG52 by Robert Taylor


GATHERING OF EAGLES by Robert Taylor


QUEEN'S FLIGHT by Robert Taylor

A specially commissioned study of her Majesty The Queen's Flight on the occasion of its 50th Anniversary. Featured are all the main aircraft to have been in service with the flight.

RETURN OF THE FEW by Robert Taylor


ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA by Robert Taylor

The Royal Yacht Britannia is show in the Thames at her traditional mooring off Castle Point against the dramatic backdrop of Tower Bridge and the Tower of London.

OPERATION CERBERUS by Robert Taylor

Portrayal of the Channel Dash - three German ships embark from Brest, France returning to home ports encounter their own mines.

ATLANTIC RENDEZVOUS by Robert Taylor


ANTHONY SAUNDERS DOUBLE REMARQUE by Anthony Saunders

There is probably no better way to own a piece of original artwork than by acquiring one of the beautifully hand drawn pencil remarque's created by Anthony Saunders, widely acknowledged as one of the most talented and exciting aviation artists at work today.

DESERT WARRIOR - THE MATTED COLLECTOR'S EDITION by Robert Taylor

For more information on this highly-restricted edition, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

ANGELS THREE ZERO by Robert Taylor

On September 18, 1940 Spitfires of 66 Squadron attacked a formation of Me109s at 30,000 feet. Oxspring came out victor in his personal duel with a Luftwaffe pilot, the moment portrayed in a fine study of the Spitfire by Robert Taylor.

FIRST COMBAT by Robert Taylor

Don Kingaby is the only pilot in the RAF to have been awarded 3 DFMs. During his first combat on August 12, 1940, he severely damaged an JU88 over the Isle of Wight and Robert Taylor captures the moment of break, with the JU88 already smoking. Don Kingaby flew a further 450 operational sorties on Spitfires.

FASTEST VICTORY by Robert Taylor

Taking his Hurricane off from Speke, a raiding JU88 crossed the airfield in front of Denys Gillam, who promptly shot it down. It was the fastest air victory of the war, and probably of all time. Robert Taylor's painting shows Gillam's Hurricane, guns blazing while undercarriage is still retracting.

HEAD ON ATTACK by Robert Taylor

On October 12, 1940, No. 603 Squadron, reduced to only eight aircraft, took on a large formation of Me109s attacking head on. Robert Taylor's vivid portrayal shows Scott-Malden's Spitfire moments after knocking down an Me109 in the encounter, both he and his wingman coming through unscathed.

TALLY HO! by Robert Taylor

In this classic Robert Taylor painting Brian Kingcome is seen leading the Spitfires of 92 Squadron in a diving attack into a force of HEIIIs over the city of London during the height of the Battle of Britain. Brian Kingcome flew Spitfires operationally virtually without break, right throughout the war.

UNEVEN ODDS by Robert Taylor

In August 1940, Frank Carey let No 43 Squadron's 'A' Flight into 'Schwarms of JU87s', escorted by Me109s. Though hopelessly outnumbered, Carey accounted for 4 JU87s before running out of ammunition. Robert Taylor's painting captures the trauma of the battle.

LANCASTER VC by Robert Taylor

A superb study of a pair of Lancaster heavy bombers as they set out on a mission over occupied Europe, painted against a powerful cloudscape. Both Bill Reid and Norman Jackson, who have signed the prints, won Britain's supreme award, the Victoria Cross, flying in Lancasters.

MOSQUITO - INTO ATTACK by Robert Taylor

Leonard Cheshire VC is one of the most outstanding of all RAF Bomber Pilots. He devised the 'master bomber' technique - flying low over the target marking with flares, allowing the main force to pinpoint the target in the darkness. Cheshire flew over 100 operational missions and was awarded the Victoria Cross for his supreme courage.

HALIFAX LEGEND by Robert Taylor

The Halifax flew no less than 75,000 operational sorties in World War II and together with the Lancaster formed the main strength of Bomber Command.

DAMBUSTERS by Robert Taylor


WELLINGTON by Robert Taylor

The only bomber to fly throughout the war, the incredible Barnes Wallis Wellington - nicknamed 'the Wimpy' bore the brunt of Bomber Command's operations in the early part of the war. This rugged aircraft is portrayed by Robert Taylor on its way to Berlin as part of one of the large scale raids in 1943.

COMING HOME TOGETHER by Robert Taylor


CORPORATE ACTION by Robert Taylor


MORAL SUPPORT by Robert Taylor


FLIGHT OF EAGLES by Robert Taylor


TYPHOON ATTACK by Robert Taylor

This superb print contains all that the Typhoon enthusiast could wish for. Famous Test Pilot and Battle of Britain veteran 'Bee' Beamont is depicted leading his 609 Squadron Typhoons into the teeth of the enemy's flak in a daring attack on German R-boats. All this in a beautiful cloud and seascape.

BOMBERS MOON by Robert Taylor


LAST FLIGHT HOME by Robert Taylor

A flight of RAF Bomber Command’s most famous heavy bomber – the magnificent Avro Lancaster – makes a safe return to base after a tough daylight raid on enemy positions in the weeks following D-Day, 1944.

BATTLE OF BRITAIN VC by Robert Taylor


BEKAA VALLEY by Robert Taylor

A dramatic combat between an F-16 Falcon and a Mig23 fought over the Bekaa Valley in June 1981. In a three day period the Israeli pilots brought down over 80 Syrian aircraft without loss. Robert Taylor's brilliant painting shows a close-up view of the action.

D-DAY NORMANDY LANDINGS by Robert Taylor

On June 6, 1944, no fewer than 4000 ships landed 133,000 assault troops on the beaches of Normandy. A further 23,000 parachuted in, whilst Allied aircraft flew 14,000 sorties on that historic day. By the end of August 200,000 seamen had transported two million troops across to France. It was the greatest and most successful military invasion in history, which led to the downfall of Hitler's Germany, and the end of the war in Europe. Robert Taylor's painting captures the very essence of that herculean battle. The painting is dominated by one of the many large transport ships, lowering her landing craft under bombardment from shore batteries. Barrage balloons flying, this massive fleet sailed into the teeth of the German defences, to land its invasion forces against all odds.

MEMORIAL FLIGHT by Robert Taylor


HIGH PATROL by Robert Taylor


AIR COMBAT PAINTINGS of ROBERT TAYLOR VOLUME ONE by Robert Taylor

‘If ever an artist could make an aircraft come to life and fly on canvas, Robert Taylor can’. The late Marshal of the Royal Air Force, Sir Arthur ‘Bomber’ Harris, BT. GCB, OBE,AFC,LLD, Commander-in-Chief, R.A.F. Bomber Command 1942-45 ‘As a fighter pilot who flew the types of aircraft that Robert Taylor paints so brilliantly, I marvel at his ability. He paints more than just aircraft; he paints with spectacular reality the whole vista of the sky that is the world of the fighter pilot. He ranks with the best.’ Air Vice Marshal J.E. ‘Johnnie’ Johnson, CB,CBE,DSO,DFC, Top scoring Allied fighter pilot of the Second World War. This is the first book to be produced featuring a comprehensive selection of Taylor’s work and it is thus a publication of great significance. The book features in-depth visual and verbal studies of many of Robert’s most outstanding early paintings, along with a wealth of pencil sketches and photographs. Those already familiar with his work will be intrigued to discover for the first time the secrets of his techniques, and all aviation buffs will delight in the behind-the-scenes stories of life with the ‘Aces.’

CUTTY SARK by Robert Taylor

The Cutty Sark sailed the world's great trading routes under the Red Ensign between 1870 and 1895, when she was sold to a Portuguese company. In 1922 she was bought by a Captain Dowman and rigged as a sail training ship. She is now preserved in dry-dock on the Thames River, Greenwich Maritime Museum, London.

BATTLE OF THE NILE by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's dramatic painting depicts the Battle of the Nile at about 1800 hours on August 1, 1798. Having caught Napoleon's French Fleet completely by surprise in Aboukir Bay, Vice-Admiral Nelson engaged at 1700 hours. Many of Napoleon's crew were ashore or visiting other ships, and the painting depicts the frantic efforts of crews to rejoin their own ships, immediately following Nelson's attack.

AIRSTRIKE by Robert Taylor

A pilot's eye view of the last seconds of a Mirage V at the hands of 801 Naval Air C.O., Commander 'Sharkey' Ward, flying a Sea Harrier from H.M.S. Invincible on May 21, 1982, in a ferocious dogfight during the Battle of Falkland Sound.

EAGLE SQUADRON SCRAMBLE by Robert Taylor

An outstanding painting commemorating the intrepid 240 American air men who volunteered to fly with the R.A.F. in their early struggle against the Luftwaffe before the U.S.A. joined the war. Taylor's painting vibrated with the roar of the Spitfires' Merlin engines as they 'Scramble' into action. Goodson later became a 4th Fighter Group Ace.

STIRLINGS OUTWARD BOUND by Robert Taylor


LANCASTER by Robert Taylor


CONTACT BEARING 190 by Robert Taylor

H.M.S. Kelly steams at full speed to intercept a U-Boat which is bearing down on an essential and otherwise vulnerable Allied supply convoy. The tension among the supply ships' crews, tempered by the strong faith in their protectors, is almost tangible.

FIRST SIGHTING by Robert Taylor

Downed aircrew often drifted for days in their small inflatable dingies hoping rescue would come. Robert Taylor's painting depicts that first sighting by an Air Sea Rescue Sunderland and the moment of joy of the aircrew.

NIGHT INTRUDER by Robert Taylor

A colourful painting depicting a Mosquito, the fastest Allied aircraft and perhaps the most versatile of all to fly in World War II, dodging between the flak and searchlights on a low-level night attack.

VICTORY OVER DUNKIRK by Robert Taylor

Fearless and effective in battle, no matter what the odds, Stanford-Tuck achieved a magnificent 29 aerial victories by 1942 when he was shot down by groundfire over Northern France. Here Bob Stanford-Tuck brings down an enemy aircraft over the port of Dunkirk early in 1940.

STORMBIRDS RISING - THE TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For more information on the main edition of Stormbirds Rising PLEASE CLICK HERE.

OPEN COCKPIT by

Each matted print is issued with a matching-numbered copy of this outstanding book, written by WWI fighter Ace and celebrated author Arthur Gould Lee, presented in its own luxury, hand-crafted presentation box.

It is a gripping first-hand account of what life was like flying and fighting during The Great War, described in such detail that only an experienced combat pilot can. Flying Sopwith Camels with the Royal Flying Corps, Lee completed 118 patrols over the front line, was engaged in combat 56 times and scored seven confirmed victories. He retired from the RAF in 1946 as an Air Vice-Marshal.

LIMPING HOME by Robert Taylor


OPERATIONS ON by Robert Taylor


SOUTH ATLANTIC TASK FORCE by Robert Taylor

H.M.S. Hermes prepares to launch her Sea Harriers whilst a Sea King stands off: H.M.S. Arrow in the foreground ploughs into the swell, whilst H.M.S. Sheffield keeps station off the port beam. Following are H.M.S. Glamorgan and the auxiliary Fleet Tankers Olna and Resource.

SEA KING RESCUE by Robert Taylor

Piloting a Sea King helicopter of 820 Naval Air Squadron, Prince Andrew was first to lift off survivors after the Atlantic Conveyor was hit by an exorcet missile. Robert Taylor's fine painting depicts the Prince in the thick of the action.

SEA HARRIERS by Robert Taylor

A symbolic study of the very first two Sea Harriers to fly with the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm, 700 Alpha Squadron, commanded by Sharkey Ward. Seen overflying Plymouth Harbour, both of these aircraft fought in the Falklands War.

SEA FURY by Robert Taylor

Flying an 805 Squadron Sea Fury from H.M.S. Ocean in Korean waters, 1952, 'Hoagy' Carmichael became the first piston engine pilot to destroy a jet aircraft when he downed a North Korean MiG.

RAMROD 792 by Robert Taylor

During operation Ramrod 792 on April 25, 1944, leading his Spitfire wing, Johnnie Johnson endured a long-running combat with an Fw190.

Robert Taylor's dramatic painting shows the last moments of this momentous duel which ended in victory for the Allied Air Forces leading Fighter Ace.

DAWN SCRAMBLE by Robert Taylor

Biggin Hill was one of the most active R.A.F. Fighter bases of World War II. Fighter aircraft scrambled as many as seven or eight times a day during the height of the Battle of Britain. Mark Vb Spitfires are seen retracting their undercarriage almost as soon as they leave the ground in order to gain height as quickly as possible.

WINGS OF GLORY - 2016 CALENDAR (detail) by The Military Gallery

Detail taken from WINGS OF GLORY - 2016 CALENDAR

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

AT THE DAY'S END - MATTED COLLECTORS EDITION by Robert Taylor

Working with a combination of graphite and coloured paints on ‘buff’ coloured paper to create a unique sepia effect, Robert Taylor’s outstanding Masterwork brings to life a moment during September 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. With an intuition unsurpassed by his peers, the world’s foremost aviation artist depicts a group of battle-weary Spitfire pilots from 92 Squadron after a long day’s fighting. Exhausted, they wait whilst ground crews hastily re-fuel and re-arm their aircraft at Biggin Hill ready for the next combat. No one knows when the alarm will sound but, when it does, they will, as always, be ready.

Many of the veterans who fought during this crucial period have sadly passed away since creating this edition, so The Military Gallery is proud that several of ‘The Few’ had previously signed the prints. It is of great historical importance that during the centenary year of the RAF such famous veterans have authenticated what is likely to be remembered as a classic by the world’s leading aviation artist.

TOWARDS THE HOME FIRES – THE P-51 TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

This historically important EIGHTEEN signature edition is issued with an original, specially commissioned pencil drawing by Robert Taylor – each signed by five distinguished exponents of the P-51. These beautiful works of art are conservation matted to include a further five outstanding Aces who flew the P-51 in combat and reproduction USAAF Wings.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

THIS SCEPTRED ISLE – TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For details on the main edition of This Sceptred Isle PLEASE CLICK HERE

ALMOST HOME – BOMBER COMMAND TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

A classic Masterwork from the world’s foremost aviation artist, released to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Royal Air Force.

EAGLES OF THE NORTH – The Matted Collectors Edition by Richard Taylor

Each print in this three signature edition is conservation matted to include reproduction Luftwaffe Wings and the original pencil signatures of two legendary Luftwaffe Aces.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

EAGLES OF THE NORTH – The Matted Remarques by Richard Taylor

Every remarque is a work of unique detail, created in pencil, embellished with subtle colour highlights, hand drawn in the lower margins of the print.

Each print in this three signature edition is conservation matted to include reproduction Luftwaffe Wings and the original pencil signatures of two legendary Luftwaffe Aces.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

BOB DOE PHOTO by


HUGH 'COCKY' DUNDAS PHOTO by


AL DEERE PHOTO by


BRIAN KINGCOME PHOTO by


TOM DALTON MORGAN PHOTO by


PETE BROTHERS PHOTO by


ARCHIE WINSKILL PHOTO by


JAMES LEATHART PHOTO by


HARBOURNE STEPHEN PHOTO by


PETER TOWNSEND PHOTO by


DAMBUSTERS – LEADING THE WAY - The Matching Numbered Book by Robert Taylor

WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

This book is available with Robert Taylor's print DAMBUSTERS - LEADING THE WAY.

For full details on this book and print portfolio PLEASE CLICK HERE

DAMBUSTERS – LEADING THE WAY - The Matted Collectors Edition by Robert Taylor

This FIVE signature edition of Robert's print DAMBUSTERS - LEADING THE WAY has been personally signed by two RAF veterans who served with 617 Squadron on the Dambusters raid and is conservation matted to include RAF Wings and the original pencil signatures of two further Dambuster veterans.

It is accompanied by a matching-numbered copy of the book WE WILL REMEMBER THEM which also includes a specially released signed bookplate.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

DAMBUSTERS – LEADING THE WAY - The Matted Remarque Editions by Robert Taylor

There are few better ways to acquire Robert's original work than his exquisite pencil remarques. Each remarque drawing will be individually created on a separate sheet of paper and set into the conservation matting. Each print in this FIVE signature edition has been personally signed by two RAF veterans who served with 617 Squadron on the Dambusters raid and is conservation matted to include RAF Wings and the original pencil signatures of two further Dambuster veterans.

It is accompanied by a matching-numbered copy of the book WE WILL REMEMBER THEM which also includes a specially released signed bookplate.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

DUEL OF EAGLES by Robert Taylor


BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR by Robert Taylor

At 1300 hours on October 21st, 1805, Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson's flagship H.H.S. Victory breaks through the French and Spanish line of battle. Her first broadside cripples Admiral Villeneuve's French flagship Bucentaure and her second badly damages the Spanish Santisima Trinidad. Perhaps the most famous warship of all time; Victory dominates the painting, symbolic of the Royal Navy's most historic victory, that thwarted Napoleons plans to conquer Britain, and gave the royal Navy supremacy of the seas which went unchallenged for a hundred years.

BATTLESHIP BISMARCK by Robert Taylor

The pride of the German Navy, this magnificent battleship attracted the full wrath of the Royal Navy when, by brilliant gunnery, she sand the Hood. Within three days she was herself sunk by the Home Fleet with the loss of all but 110 of her crew.

H.M.S. BELFAST by Robert Taylor

At the outbreak of World War II, H.M.S. Belfast had already joined the Home Fleet operating out of Scapa Flow. Patrolling north of the Faeroes in October 1939 she came across and captured the German liner Cap Norte. This success was short-lived, however, when she struck a mine, the explosion breaking her back. After repairs and modernisation she was the best-equipped cruiser afloat. Later she went on to play an important role in the Normandy Landings of June 1944.

CANADIAN WING by Robert Taylor

Spitfires of Johnson's Canadian Wing, complete with Normandy Invasion markings, making a sweep above the Normandy beaches on the 6th June, 1944 - D-Day. Johnson and his Canadian pilots flew sweeps on this day from dawn till dusk, limited most of the day to 2000 ft. by the cloudbase. Two days later, Johnson

MEMPHIS BELLE by Robert Taylor


RED ARROWS by Robert Taylor

The R.A.F.'s Red Arrows - perhaps the finest close formation aerobatic team in the world, flying their renowned Hawk jets over the Gloucestershire countryside.

CLIMBING OUT by Robert Taylor


MOUNT STEWART by Robert Taylor

The barque Mount Stewart, bound for Australia just prior to the First World War. Built in the last decade of the 18th Century, she was commissioned solely for the Australian wool trade and was a superb example of one of the last, steel built, full riggers.

LIVERPOOL 1880 by Robert Taylor

Situated on the River Mersey on the north-east coast of England, Liverpool was ideally suited for the Atlantic traders and became one of the important points of departure for emigrants heading for the New World.

PACIFIC GLORY – TRIBUTE EDITION by Anthony Saunders

For details on the main edition of Pacific Glory PLEASE CLICK HERE

COUP DE GRACE
The Tribute Edition
by Anthony Saunders

For information on this commemorative edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

DAMBUSTERS – ‘GONER 58A’ – COLLECTORS EDITION by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor’s dramatic work in graphite and paint – originally created as the working drawing for his highly acclaimed painting Three Good Bounces – depicts a moment during Flight Lieutenant Mick Martin’s attack on the Möhne Dam. With two attacks already made Martin, flying AJ-P, releases his Upkeep while Gibson in Lancaster AJ-G flies off his starboard beam in an attempt to draw some of the enemy flak. It was unsuccessful; his radio operator tapping out ‘Goner-5-8-A’ (the code for - ‘Special weapon released’) ‘exploded 50 yards from target’ – ‘no apparent breach’ – ‘target A’.

NO MANS LAND - REMARQUE EDITIONS by Richard Taylor

To honour all those who fought with the Tank and Armoured Vehicle Corps during The Great War, each copy of No Man’s Land is conservation matted to include an ORIGINAL pair of WWI Campaign Medals – The WWI British War Medal and Victory Medal – which have been sourced and collected over a number of years. Each pair of medals was actually issued to a member of the BRITISH TANK CORPS and have the recipients Service, Rank, Name and Number impressed on them.

ARRIVAL OF EAGLES by

Each print in this book and print portfolio is issued with a matching-numbered, hard-back copy of the book ARRIVAL OF EAGLES by distinguished author and historian Andy Saunders.

ATTACKING THE SORPE DAM – MATTED REMARQUES by Richard Taylor

For details on the main edition of Attacking the Sorpe Dam PLEASE CLICK HERE.

H.M.S. HOOD by Robert Taylor


HURRICANES by Robert Taylor


SPITFIRE by Robert Taylor


STEAMING INTO WIND by Robert Taylor


EVENING SURF by Robert Taylor


LAST PHANTOM by Robert Taylor

F4 Phantom

FIGHTER ESCORT by Robert Taylor

Lt Rep Jones and Lt Leo Kearns lead P-51s of the 77th Fighter Squadron, 20th Fighter Group from their base at Kings Cliffe on the morning of 14 January 1945.

For more information on the main edition Headlong Into The Clash - PLEASE CLICK HERE.

HEADLONG INTO THE CLASH – TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

Representing the ultimate in collecting, this NINETEEN signature edition comprises all signatures of the War in Europe Edition and is issued with an ORIGINAL PENCIL work specially created by Robert Taylor.

Each drawing is signed by two leading Bf109 Luftwaffe Aces and a famous P-51 Mustang Ace. It is conservation matted to include the original signatures of a further three pilots of both the Luftwaffe and USAAF who fought in the skies over Germany as the Allies pushed for victory during WWII.

For more information on the main edition Headlong Into The Clash - PLEASE CLICK HERE.

THE FRONT - DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

Regarded as one of the most gifted exponents of pencil work in the industry, Richard Taylor will hand-craft an original drawing in the lower margin of each print to create a unique collectors piece.

MOSQUITOS AT DUSK – THE VICTORIA CROSS EDITION by Gerald Coulson

Each print in this EIGHT signature edition is issued with a matching-numbered copy of MOONLIGHT by Gerald Coulson. This atmospheric piece has been personally signed by a highly-respected Mosquito Navigator and conservation matted to include a museum quality reproduction of a miniature Victoria Cross and the original signature of one of the most legendary Mosquito Pilots of WWII.

For more information on the signatures and the main edition of MOSQUITOS AT DUSK – CLICK HERE.

RT2R09 by Richard Taylor

Richard is firmly secured as one of the most collected artists in the industry and the demand for his original work is huge. His pencil work in particular is extremely popular and his superb pencil remarques - highly skilled examples of original art – have increasingly become highly valued collectors’ pieces.

LOOKING FOR TROUBLE - THE TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

Each print in this FOURTEEN signature edition is issued with a unique pencil drawing exclusively created by Robert Taylor. Individually signed by four renowned P-51 pilots, each drawing is conservation matted to include the original signatures of two more Mustang Aces.

For full details on the main edition PLEASE CLICK HERE.

ARK ROYAL by Robert Taylor

Robert Taylor's tribute to, H.M.S. Ark Royal, Britains last conventional aircraft carrier, seen steaming with her phantoms on deck. Launched in 1950, H.M.S. Ark Royal entered service in 1955 and her flag flying tours over the next two decades took her to the far corners of the world.

H.M.S. KELLY by Robert Taylor


H.M.S. CAVALIER by Robert Taylor


H.M.S. KELLY AT GRAND HARBOUR, MALTA by Robert Taylor


PHANTOM LAUNCH by Robert Taylor


GOLDEN HINDE by Robert Taylor


OKINAWA – THE OKINAWA TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

This outstanding TWENTY TWO signature edition is issued with a stunning individually commissioned original pencil drawing by Robert Taylor.

Each drawing is personally signed by two Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm fighter pilots who flew Corsairs during the Battle of Okinawa, and conservation matted to include the highly-prized original signatures of three legendary USMC Aces who flew in the Okinawa Campaign.

For full details on this edition PLEASE CLICK HERE

THE FINAL SHOW – TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For details on the main edition of The Final Show PLEASE CLICK HERE

VITAL ASSAULT - THE D-DAY TRIBUTE EDITION by Simon Smith

Each print in this edition is issued with a separate specially commissioned original pencil drawing by Simon Smith which has been conservation matted to include the original pencil signatures of two veterans who fought at ‘Bloody’ Omaha Beach on D- Day and would go on to join the Rangers in their advance through Normandy.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE

SAINTE MERE EGLISE – U.S. AIRBORNE TRIBUTE EDITION by Simon Smith

Each print in this edition is issued with a specially commissioned original pencil drawing by Simon Smith which has been signed by two distinguished US Airborne veterans who jumped into Normandy on D-Day. It is also conservation matted to include the original pencil signatures of a further two veterans who served with the famous ‘Band of Brothers’, Easy Company, 101st Airborne.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CLICK HERE

KING OF THE AIR – MATTED TRIBUTE DRAWING by Anthony Saunders

This outstanding TEN signature edition is issued with an ORIGINAL pencil drawing by Anthony Saunders.

ONLY AVAILABLE WITH THE TRIBUTE EDITION OF KING OF THE AIR – PLEASE SEE MAIN EDITION FOR DETAILS

HUNTERS AT DAWN – BARKHORN TRIBUTE EDITION by Robert Taylor

For details on the main edition of Hunters at Dawn PLEASE CLICK HERE

DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

RICHARD TAYLOR DOUBLE REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

RICHAR TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

RICHARD TAYLOR REMARQUE by Richard Taylor

TAKING REMARQUE'S TO A NEW LEVEL OF EXCELLENCE Few artists of today possess Richard Taylor’s breathtaking skills with a pencil but now the artist has lifted the bar even further. Richard has without doubt taken the art of graphite creation to an entirely new level by introducing subtle coloured highlights into his pencil work. Collectors now have a wonderful opportunity to acquire one of these remarkable 'colour' remarques.

OVERLORD - D-DAY AND THE BATTLE FOR NORMANDY LIMITED EDITION by The Military Gallery


SAFELY HOME by Nicolas Trudgian

A lone Lancaster struggles home escorted by Hurricanes of 1 Sqn. Over Pin Mill, Suffolk after a hazardous bombing raid over Germany, summer 1942.

by


MOSQUITOS AT DUSK by Nicolas Trudgian

Nicolas Trudgian’s new painting, Mosquitos at Dusk, conveys in an instant all the attributes of this outstanding attack aircraft With their twin Merlins singing at full power, Mk FBV1 Mosquitos of 464 Squadron RAAF present a menacing picture as they set out on a precision low level mission, their streamlined, shark-like shapes silhouetted against the evening glow. Below, the tranquillity of a snow covered English coastal village is briefly disturbed as the Mosquito crews head into the night. A painting worthy of this much acclaimed World War II plane.

HEROES RETURN by Nicolas Trudgian

In a classic image of wartime England, Mk V Spitfires, symbol of the RAF, defiant against the threat of the Luftwaffe return to their base in the heart of the beautiful rolling English countryside.Superb pencil drawing print.

CREWING UP by Robert Taylor


VICTORY SALUTE by Robert Taylor

A magnificent painting by Robert Taylor, specially commissioned by The Military Gallery to commemorate the Anniversary of the Allied victory in World War II. Britain's leading aviation artist brings to life the two greatest British fighter aircraft ever to fly, in a gigantic vista over London and the River Thames. A truly symbolic painting, rich in colour and brimming with emotion, a picture to commemorate the greatest military victory in history.

THE HOMECOMING by Robert Taylor

Returning from an evening coastal sweep, Fw190 pilots of JG2 make a low pass to welcome home the type VII U-boats of the 9th Submarine Flotilla as they sail into the calm waters of the Brest Roads. Relaxed now, but weary from an arduous period of action in the North Atlantic, the U-boat crews wave acknowledgement to the aerial salute from their Luftwaffe comrades.

HORNBLOWER AND THE 'INDEFATIGABLE' by Robert Taylor

Winter in the Bay of Biscay brings ferocious gales and bitter cold discomfort for ships' crews aboard the British frigate Indefatigable. Horatio Hornblower, C.S. Forrester's dashing eighteenth-century naval officer, experienced the worst of conditions at sea while serving the arduous task of blockading the ports off the west coast of France. The excitement of battle came as welcome relief. Robert's magnificent painting depicts an exchange of cannon fire between Indefatigable - on the left - and a 40-gun French frigate attempting to run the blockade on a chill winter's morning. Moments later the two hulls crashed alongside each other, and the Frenchman was boarded and taken.


 

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